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Appendix:Metagame terminology

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The Pokémon metagame has a wide range of fanmade terminology for various aspects of the games. These are colloquial terms originating from unofficial sources, and are not found within the games themselves.

General terms

Baton Pass chain

Refers to continuous use of the move Baton Pass and the accumulated stat changes.

Choice lock

Refers to how the held items Choice Band, Choice Scarf, and Choice Specs limit a Pokémon to use only one of its moves. A Pokémon is said to be "Choice locked" into a specific move if forced to use it by a Choice item.

Clause

Clauses refer to the various rules that are applied to battles, such as restrictions on which Pokémon, moves, and items may be used. Many of these rules are found in the games, applied in settings such as battle facilities and multiplayer features.

Evasion clause

Refers to a ban on moves that raise evasion (such as Double Team). Does not necessarily put a ban on moves that reduce accuracy (such as Sand-Attack) or moves/Abilities that merely have a possibility of raising evasion (such as Acupressure/Moody).

Freeze clause

Refers to technical measures taken in order to prevent multiple Pokémon on the same team from being frozen solid at the same time. Found in games like Pokémon Stadium and battle simulators like Pokémon Online.

Item clause

Refers to a ban on multiple Pokémon of the same team holding the same item. Found in battle facilities and officially organized tournaments, but widely ignored in many large communities.

Level clause

Refers to measures taken to ensure that all Pokémon used by both Trainers are close to or at the same level—usually 50 or 100. Found in battle facilities and Wi-Fi features.

Sleep clause

Refers to a ban on the usage of sleep-inducing moves when one of the opponent's Pokémon has already been put to sleep by one of the user's Pokémon. As such, the move Rest and the Ability Effect Spore do not violate this ban. Found in Pokémon Battle Revolution.

Hax

Refers to outcomes that are perceived as unlikely to the point of being unfair. Common targets are critical hits, moves missing, the success of secondary effects, and full paralysis. Can also refer to reliance on uncertain outcomes, such as the use of one-hit knockout moves or held items like Quick Claw, Focus Band, or BrightPowder. Hax is, somewhat paradoxically, often associated with the Ability Serene Grace.

HO

Refers to hyper offense, or heavy offense, which is a team-building and battling strategy intended to overwhelm the opponent with offensive pressure.

HP <type>

Refers to the move Hidden Power and its type (e.g. HP Ice, HP Fire).

IV battle

Refers to a battle held solely for the purpose of observing the stats of one or more Pokémon as they appear when set to a higher level for the duration of the battle, thus making it easier to estimate the Pokémon's individual values.

Mono team

Refers to a team with homogeneity in a certain area such as type, color, or generation.

Pinch Berry

Refers to the Liechi, Ganlon, Salac, Petaya, Apicot, Lansat, and Starf Berries, which all raise a stat when the holding Pokémon's HP drops below ¼ (referred to as being in a pinch in the games). The Micle and Custap Berries may also be considered Pinch Berries.

Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Main article: Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Refers to the Pokémon Dragonite, Tyranitar, Salamence, Metagross, Garchomp, Hydreigon, and Goodra.

Spam

Refers to repeated use of the same move or Pokémon.

Standard rules

Refer to a set of widely employed rules for multiplayer battles. A Single Battle, with the species, sleep, and evasion clauses, as well as bans on hacks, one-hit knockout moves, and Pokémon in the (abided) Uber tier.

Tier

Main article: Tier

Theorymon

Discussing the metagame hypothetically. Includes discussions such as Pokémon having access to certain moves, Abilities, or combinations of these.

Type coverage

Refers to how the types of damage-dealing moves known by a Pokémon match up against all 18 types and their many combinations in terms of effectiveness.

Pokémon sets

Refer to Pokémon not only by species, but also by their stats, moves, Ability and held item.

Common roles

Within competitive battling there are a number of categories that are used to describe the intended role of a Pokémon set.

Annoyer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent the opponent from progressing with their strategy, commonly through the use of status moves and status conditions.

Anti-lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first.

Attack lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first, through the use of damage-dealing moves supported by a high Attack or Special Attack stat.

Baton Passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use the move Baton Pass in order to pass on positive stat changes and/or volatile battle statuses, which it may or may not have contributed to itself.

Bolt Beam

Refers to the moves Thunderbolt and Ice Beam being present in a Pokémon set, and the resulting offensive type synergy. "Pseudo Bolt Beam" refers to a damage-dealing Electric-type move and a damage-dealing Ice-type move being present in a Pokémon set, when these aren't the exact combination of Thunderbolt and Ice Beam. Bolt Beam is amply featured in the games.

Bulky

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both.

Check

Refers to a Pokémon set that has an advantage over another Pokémon set such that it can easily defeat that other Pokémon or force it to switch out. A check differs from a counter in that a check cannot switch in then threaten the Pokémon.

ChestoResto

Refers to the move Rest and the held item Chesto Berry being present in a Pokémon set. It is amply featured in the games.

Choice user

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Band, Choice Scarf, or Choice Specs. Branched into numerous terms such as "Choiced", "Banded" "Scarfed", "Specced", "Choice", "Band", "Scarf", "Specs", "CB" <Pokémon>.

Cleric

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to restore the HP and/or cure the status conditions of its allies, through the use of status moves like Wish and Aromatherapy.

Counter

Refers to a Pokémon set that has an advantage over another Pokémon set such that it can switch into an attack from that other Pokémon and easily defeat it or force it to switch out. A counter differs from a check in that a counter can switch into an attack and still threaten the Pokémon.

DDer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Dragon Dance.

Decoy

Refers to a Pokémon that is knocked out as part of the course of action chosen by its Trainer in the given battle situation. Also referred to as "Death Fodder".

Disquake

Refers to the Double Battle combination of one or more (Flying/Levitating Electric-type) Pokémon sets that include Discharge with one or more (Ground-type) Pokémon sets that include Earthquake, and the resulting defensive and offensive type synergy.

Dual screens

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Light Screen and Reflect.

Edgequake

Refers to the moves Stone Edge and Earthquake being present in a Pokémon set, and the resulting offensive type synergy. "Pseudo Edgequake" refers to a damage-dealing Rock-type move and a damage-dealing Ground-type move being present in a Pokémon set, when these aren't the exact combination of Stone Edge and Earthquake (such as Earth Power and Rock Slide). Edgequake is amply featured in the games.

Endureversal

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Endure and Reversal or Flail. May be assisted through the use of a Focus Sash, Salac Berry, or Liechi Berry. It is amply featured in the games. There are many similar strategies, including F.E.A.R.

F.E.A.R.

Main article: Appendix:F.E.A.R.

Refers to a Pokémon set with a comparatively low HP stat, holding a Focus Sash, with the move Endeavor and a damage-dealing move with increased priority. Some variations use the Ability Sturdy instead of Focus Sash.

F.E.A.R. counter

A Pokémon meant to prevent F.E.A.R. from working properly. Common F.E.A.R. counters are Ghost-type Pokémon and Pokémon with Sand Stream or Snow Warning.

Glass cannon

Refers to a Pokémon set with comparatively high Attack and/or Special Attack that, due to its combination of HP and Defense/Special Defense, takes a comparatively high percentage of damage from damage-dealing moves.

Hazer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Haze.

Phazer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to eliminate an opponent's Pokémon's positive stat changes and/or other beneficial effects without using Haze. One approach is to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail. Another approach is to pressure the opponent to call back their Pokémon, by using status moves with disadvantageous effects that can be removed through switching (such as Leech Seed, Perish Song, or Yawn).

Originally referred to as a pseudo-hazer, it has since been shorted to PHazer, and now commonly formatted simply phazer.

Lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, or one of the Pokémon sets that is commonly sent out first.

Suicide lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, including a comparatively high Speed stat, one or more moves that cause entry hazards and the held item Focus Sash or the Ability Sturdy.

Paraflincher

Refers to a Pokémon set that is capable of inducing paralysis and causing flinching. Often combined with Serene Grace to increase the likelihood of flinching.

PerishTrapper

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Perish Song and a trapping move or Ability. This is intended to trap the opponent and use Perish Song, keeping them trapped until they faint from Perish Song.

Powerhouse

Refers to a Pokémon species that due to its stats, type(s), Ability, and movepool, merits usage without much regard to the team it is put on, being capable of doing good on most teams as a stand-alone Pokémon.

Pseudo-passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to aid its allies directly through the use of status moves with beneficial effects (such as Wish or Reflect), but without using Baton Pass.

Rest Talker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Rest and Sleep Talk. It is amply featured in the games. Also referred to as a "Sleep Talker" or a "STalker".

Revenge killer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon without preparation by timing the free switch-in that is granted when an ally is knocked out. Is typically tailored torwards getting to move first, by including one or more damage-dealing moves with increased priority and/or a comparatively high Speed stat (achieved with or without the held item Choice Scarf). This aspect of Pokémon battling is highlighted in the games in the form of the move Retaliate.

Sashed

Refers to the held item Focus Sash being present in a Pokémon set.

Shuffler

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail.

Status shuffler

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to inflict status conditions on multiple opposing Pokémon, and cause multiple switches from the opponent in order to achieve this end.

Spinner

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Rapid Spin.

Spiker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Spikes.

Staller

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force a standstill in order to enjoy its advantages, which may include recurring effect damage to opposing Pokémon (such as from certain status conditions or weather conditions). This may be achieved through the use of moves/held items/Abilities that restore HP and/or moves like Protect, usually combined with stats and type(s) that minimize the percentage of damage taken from damage-dealing moves. It is amply featured in the games.

Suicide Spiker/Rocker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes one or more moves that cause entry hazards and the move Explosion.

Seeder

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Leech Seed. A "Subseeder" refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Leech Seed.

Smash Pass

Refers to the stat changes caused by Shell Smash being passed on to an ally via Baton Pass.

Spinblocker

Refers to a Ghost-type Pokémon that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from successfully using Rapid Spin.

Sub CM

Refers to the moves Substitute and Calm Mind being present in a Pokémon set.

Subpasser

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to create a substitute by using Substitute and pass it on to an ally by using Baton Pass.

Subpuncher

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Focus Punch. It is amply featured in the games.

Subseeder

Refers to a seeder Pokémon set that includes the move Substitute.

Subsplit

Refers to a Pokémon, typically with a low HP stat, whose set that includes the moves Substitute and Pain Split. After creating a substitute, the Pokémon regains their HP by using Pain Split on the opponent.

Subsweeper

Refers to a Pokémon set that typically includes the move Substitute and three attacking moves.

Sunnybeamer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use Solar Beam under intense sunlight.

Sweeper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon in succession, usually through the assistance of positive stat changes. Commonly branched into the categories physical sweeper, special sweeper, and mixed sweeper, depending on its stats and damage-dealing moves.

Tank

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both, while at the same time posing a threat in the form of damage-dealing moves backed by a comparatively high Attack or Special Attack stat. Is similar to a wall.

Thunderdancer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Thunder and Rain Dance.

Trapper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from switching out, through the effects of various status moves, damage-dealing moves, or Abilities, and take advantage of the situation.

Volt Turn

Refers to the combination of one or more Pokémon sets that include Volt Switch with one or more Pokémon sets that include U-turn.

Wall

Also known as a sponge, this term refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both. Commonly branched into the categories physical wall, special wall, and mixed wall, depending on its stats. Is similar to a tank.

Wonderbuster

Prior to Generation VI, refers to a Pokémon that can counter Wondereye and Wondertomb. Usually includes a type-changing move and a move that is super effective against it (e.g. a Lanturn with Soak and Thunderbolt).

Species-specific sets

Bellyzard

Refers to a Charizard set that includes the move Belly Drum, the Ability Blaze, and an HP stat that is divisible by 4. It is commonly assisted by a Salac Berry and/or the move Substitute. It has fallen out of favor since Generation IV due to Stealth Rock.

Calmcune

Refers to a Suicune set that includes the move Calm Mind, commonly assisted by Rest.

Celetran

Refers to a Celebi set and a Heatran set being present in a team, and the resulting defensive synergy.

Chainchomp

Refers to a Garchomp set that includes special moves backed by high Special Attack and Speed stats.

Crocune

Refers to a Suicune set that includes the moves Calm Mind, Rest, Sleep Talk, and a special move, crediting a perceived inventor by Internet handle.

Curselax

Refers to a Snorlax set that includes the moves Curse and Rest.

Drizzletoed

Refers to a Politoed set that includes the Ability Drizzle.

Droughttales

Refers to a Ninetales set that includes the Ability Drought.

Leadape

Refers to an Infernape set that is sent out first, commonly including both physical and special moves, Fake Out, Stealth Rock, and the held item Focus Sash.

McIcegar

Refers to a Gengar set that includes the moves Ice Punch, Focus Punch, and Substitute, intended for use in Generation III.

Mixape

Refers to an Infernape set that includes both physical and special moves, backed by comparatively high Attack, Special Attack, and Speed stats.

Mixmence

Refers to a Salamence set that includes both physical and special moves, backed by comparatively high Attack, Special Attack, and Speed stats.

Scarfchomp

Refers to a Garchomp set that includes the held item Choice Scarf. It is featured in several battle facilities found in the games.

SkarmBliss

Refers to a Skarmory set and a Blissey set being present in a team, and the resulting defensive synergy.

Specsmence

Refers to a Salamence set that includes the held item Choice Specs.

Stallrein

Refers to a Walrein set that includes Protect, Substitute, Leftovers, and Ice Body, intended for stalling during a hailstorm.

Techniloom

Refers to a Breloom set that includes the Ability Technician and one or more moves with base powers of 60 or less.

TyraniBoah

Refers to a Tyranitar set that includes both physical and special moves, including the moves Substitute and Focus Punch.

Wondertomb/Wondereye

Refers to a Spiritomb or Sableye that has been hacked to have the Ability Wonder Guard, making it immune to essentially all direct damage. This term is essentially obsolete as of Generation VI as the Dark/Ghost type combination no longer has zero weaknesses with the introduction of the Fairy type.

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