User:TehPerson/Status condition

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Status conditions (Japanese: 状態異常 abnormal condition), also referred to as status problems or status ailments, affect a Pokémon's ability to battle.

The Pokérus is a similar but unrelated concept.

In the core series and side series

Most status conditions are non-volatile, meaning that it remains on a Pokémon after being switched out. In most games, non-volatile conditions persist even after a battle has ended. They can be cured at a Pokémon Center or by using specific curative items, moves, or Abilities. Confusion is the only volatile status condition, so it wears off when the affected Pokémon is switched out or when the battle ends.

Non-volatile status conditions displayed in the party screen and the Pokémon's summary. And during battle, a Pokémon is affected by a non-volatile status condition, an icon will display the type of status condition (replacing the Pokémon's level in Generations I and II). Wild Pokémon that are affected by a non-volatile status condition are easier to catch.

In all games except Pokémon Legends: Arceus, a Pokémon cannot gain a non-volatile status condition if it's already afflicted by another one, and a non-volatile status condition does not wear off automatically when the battle ends. If a Pokémon under a status condition (such as a poisoned Cascoon) evolves, the condition will be kept, even if the Pokémon gains a new type or Ability that would normally prevent it.

In Pokémon Legends: Arceus, all non-volatile status conditions have a set turn count and wear off after battle. If a Pokémon already has a non-volatile status condition, inflicting it with another one can overwrite it.

A Pokémon cannot gain non-volatile status conditions when it is affected by Safeguard, Leaf Guard, Flower Veil, Shields Down, Comatose, or Misty Terrain, or a Pokémon behind a substitute can gain status conditions, except due to Synchronize or held item like Flame Orb or Toxic Orb. A Pokémon will cure its status condition when affected by Haze (Generation I only), Rest, Refresh, Heal Bell, Aromatherapy, Psycho Shift, Jungle Healing, G-Max Sweetness, Natural Cure, Shed Skin, Healer, Hydration, or Lum Berry. Player can cure any status condition of their Pokémon by using on it any of the following items: Full Heal, Full Restore, Heal Powder, Pewter Crunchies, Rage Candy Bar, Lava Cookie, Old Gateau, Jubilife Muffin, Casteliacone, Lumiose Galette, Shalour Sable, Big Malasada, Sacred Ash, or Lum Berry ( MiracleBerry in Generation II).

Pokémon with Guts, Marvel Scale, or Quick Feet will have their Attack, Defense or Speed increased, respectively, when affected by a non-volatile status condition. In addition, the base power of Facade is doubled (from 70 to 140) when inflicted with any of these three status conditions.

Burn

Ursaring is burned
Main article: Burn (status condition)

The burn condition (BRN) inflicts damage every turn and halves damage dealt by a Pokémon's physical moves (except Pokémon with the Guts Ability and Facade from Generation VI onward). In Generation I and from Generation VII onward, burn inflicts damage equal to 1/16 of its maximum HP every turn; from Generation II to VI, burn inflicts damage equal to 1/8 of its maximum HP every turn. Burn damage is halved if the Pokémon has the Ability Heatproof. In Generation V, Pokémon glow red while afflicted with burn.

Most moves which cause burn are Fire-type and burning the prime effect of Will-O-Wisp, however it also can be caused by the ability Flame Body or holding a Flame Orb. In Generations I and II, Fire-type Pokémon cannot be burned by Fire-type moves (but they can be burned by Tri Attack in Generation II). From Generation III onward, Fire-type Pokémon and Pokémon with the Water Veil or Water Bubble Ability cannot normally be burned. Pokémon with the Ability Heatproof will only lose half the HP each turn, while Pokémon with Magic Guard are immune to the HP loss (but still suffer from the attack drop). Pokémon with Flare Boost will have their Special Attack increased when burned. A burn can be cured with the use of a Burn Heal, Yago Berry (Generation III only), or a Rawst Berry (Ice Berry in Generation II).

In Generations I and II, burn damage is applied after the Pokémon takes its turn, but is skipped if the opponent faints during that turn. From Generation III onward, burn damage is applied after all Pokémon on the field have taken their turns (and there is no skipping).

Confusion

Main article: Confusion (status condition)
Riolu is confused

The confused condition causes a Pokémon to sometimes hurt itself in its confusion instead of executing a selected move.

As a volatile status condition, it wears off once the afflicted Pokémon exits battle. However, it can also be afflicted on Pokémon that already have other status conditions.

In Pokémon Legends: Arceus, this status condition is absent.

Drowsy

Drowsy redirects here. For the Pokémon, see Drowzee.

DrowsyIC LA.png

Drowsy is a status condition exclusive to Pokémon Legends: Arceus, replacing the sleep condition (and the volatile battle state that shares the same name). It works similarly to paralysis, and may cause the afflicted Pokémon to be unable to move. Drowsy Pokémon also take increased damage from direct attacks. When it is snowing, drowsy Pokémon are more likely to fail to act.

Using Spark, Volt Tackle, or Wild Charge will cure the user of drowsiness. Rest inflicts drowsiness on the user lasting four turns.

Games Description
LA The Pokémon is drowsy and may fail to act. Any damage it takes is also increased.

Freeze

Yamper is frozen
Main article: Freeze (status condition)

The freeze condition (FRZ) causes a Pokémon to be unable to use moves. From Generation II onward, the frozen Pokémon has a chance to be thawed each turn (10% in Generation II or 20% in Generation III onwards), possibly even thawing right after being frozen; however, in Generation I, a frozen Pokémon never thaws without external aid. Pokémon cannot be frozen in harsh sunlight.

All moves which cause freezing are Ice-type, except Tri Attack (Generation II onward), Secret Power (when used in snow or ice; Generation IV onward) and Freezing Glare. In Generations I and II, Ice-type Pokémon cannot be frozen by Ice-type moves (but they can be frozen by Tri Attack in Generation II). From Generation III onward, Ice-type Pokémon and Pokémon with the Magma Armor Ability cannot normally be frozen. Being frozen can be cured with the use of an Ice Heal, a Aspear Berry (Burnt Berry in Generation II) or Pumkin Berry (Generation III only).

A frozen Pokémon can still use the moves Fusion Flare, Flame Wheel, Sacred Fire, Flare Blitz, Scald, and Steam Eruption while frozen; these moves will thaw the user and be executed normally. In Generation V, Pokémon glow blue and stop moving while afflicted with freeze. If a frozen Pokémon is hit by a damaging Fire-type move (except Fire Spin in generations I and II or Hidden Power in generations I-III), Scald (Generation VI onward) or Steam Eruption, it will be thawed.

In Pokémon Legends: Arceus, this status condition is absent. Moves that would otherwise cause freezing inflicts frostbite instead.

Frostbite

FrostbiteIC LA.png

Frostbite is a status condition exclusive to Pokémon Legends: Arceus, replacing the freeze condition. Similar to a burn, frostbite inflicts damage equal to 1/16 of the target's maximum HP every turn, and it reduces damage dealt by its special moves during this time. When it is snowing, moves that may inflict frostbite are more likely to do so. Ice-type Pokémon cannot get frostbite.

Using Flame Wheel or Flare Blitz will cure the user of frostbite.

Games Description
LA At the end of each turn, the Pokémon is hurt by its frostbite. Any damage it deals with special moves will also be reduced.

Paralysis

Ursaring is paralyzed
Main article: Paralysis (status condition)

The paralysis condition (PAR) reduces the Pokémon's Speed stat and causes it to have a 25% chance of being unable to use a move ("fully paralyzed") when trying to use one. From Generation I to VI, its Speed is reduced to 25% of its normal value; in Generation VII, its Speed is reduced to 50% of its normal value. Pokémon with the Quick Feet Ability instead have their Speed increased by 50% while paralyzed. In Generation V, Pokémon glow yellow while afflicted with paralysis and their animation will be slowed significantly.

Many moves that cause paralysis are Electric-type moves and paralysis is the main effect of the move Thunder Wave. It can also be caused by Static, Effect Spore, or Gulp Missile. In Generation I, Pokémon cannot be paralyzed by damaging moves of the same type as themselves. From Generation VI onward, Electric-type Pokémon cannot be paralyzed. Pokémon with the Limber Ability cannot normally be paralyzed. Furthermore, if its target is paralyzed, Smelling Salts will cure the paralysis in addition to becoming more powerful. Paralysis can be cured with the use of a Paralyze Heal or a Cheri Berry (PRZCureBerry in Generation II). In Generation IV only, the Ability Magic Guard will prevent Pokémon from being fully paralyzed; however, it does not prevent the Speed reduction.

Poison

Pikachu is poisoned
Main article: Poison (status condition)

The poison condition (PSN) inflicts damage every turn. In Generation I, poison inflicts damage equal to 1/16 of its maximum HP every turn; from Generation II onward, it inflicts damage equal to 1/8 of its maximum HP. A Pokémon with the Poison Heal Ability will restore an equivalent amount of HP instead of taking damage. In Generation V, Pokémon glow purple while afflicted with poison.

All moves which cause poison are Poison-type, except Twineedle, Secret Power (when used in tall grass; Generation III only), Psycho Shift (while poisoned), and Fling (if Poison Barb or Toxic Orb is held). Poison-type Pokémon cannot be normally poisoned. The other causes of poisoning are one layer of Toxic Spikes, Poison Point, Effect Spore, or Poison Touch. In Generation II, Steel-type Pokémon cannot be poisoned by Poison-type moves (but they can be poisoned by Twineedle); from Generation III onward, Steel-type Pokémon and Pokémon with the Immunity Ability cannot normally be poisoned. Poison- and Steel-type Pokémon can be poisoned by a Pokémon with the Corrosion Ability. Poison (including bad poison) can be cured with the use of an Antidote, Drash Berry (Generation III only) and Pecha Berry (PSNCureBerry in Generation II).

In Generations I and II, poison damage is applied after the Pokémon takes its turn, but is skipped if the opponent faints during that turn. From Generation III onward, poison damage is applied after all Pokémon on the field have taken their turns (and there is no skipping).

From Generation I to IV, a poisoned Pokémon loses 1 HP for every four steps taken outside of battle. In Generation IV, a Pokémon whose HP is reduced to 1 via poison outside of battle will have the poison status removed; in Generations I to III, its HP will be reduced to 0 (causing it to faint).

Badly poisoned

The bad poison condition inflicts damage every turn, with the amount of damage increasing each turn. It initially inflicts damage equal to 1/16 of the Pokémon's maximum HP, with the damage inflicted increasing by 1/16 each turn (2/16 on the second turn, 3/16 on the third turn, etc.). In Generation V, Pokémon glow purple while afflicted with bad poison. Starting from Generation V bad poison is also marked by darker status flag in the battle and Pokémon summary.

In Generations I and II, if a badly poisoned Pokémon is switched out, the condition reverts to regular poison. From Generation III onward, the poison remains bad poison while switched out, but the damage counter will be reset when switched back in (i.e. it always will take 1/16 of its maximum HP as damage after switching in). In Generations I, II, and from Generation V onwards, after a battle is over, the badly poisoned status will become a regular poison. Bad poison can be cured by the same ways the regular poison is.

All moves which badly poison are Poison-type, except Psycho Shift (while badly poisoned) and Fling (if Toxic Orb is held). Badly poison is the main effect of the move Toxic and two layers of Toxic Spikes.

Sleep

Magikarp is asleep
Main article: Sleep (status condition)

The sleep condition (SLP) causes a Pokémon to be unable to use moves, except Snore and Sleep Talk. From Generation V onward, Pokémon close their eyes while sleeping and move more slowly.

Sleep lasts for a randomly chosen duration of 1 to 7 turns in the handheld Generation I games, 1 to 3 turns in Pokémon Stadium, 1 to 5 turns in Generations II to IV (except the Japanese versions of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl), and 1 to 3 turns in Generation V onwards,[1]. In the Japanese versions of Diamond and Pearl, the minimum and maximum sleep count is 1 turn higher, lasting 2 to 6 turns.[2] If a Pokémon puts itself to sleep using Rest, it will sleep for exactly 2 turns.

Plenty of moves are able to put a Pokémon to sleep, most of them are either Normal-type, Psychic-type, or Grass-type. In addition to moves that cause sleep, after contact with Effect Spore or a disobedient Pokémon may also nap during battle. Pokémon with the Vital Spirit or Insomnia Ability cannot normally be put to sleep. Worry Seed changes the target's Ability to Insomnia causing it to be unable to sleep too. A sleeping Pokémon can be awoken by an Awakening or a Chesto Berry (Mint Berry in Generation II). If its target is sleeping, Wake-Up Slap will wake it up in addition to becoming more powerful. In Generation I core series games and Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, the Poké Flute can be used in battle to wake up a sleeping Pokémon (without being consumed). In the Generation III and IV core series games and Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, the Blue Flute can be used to wake up a sleeping Pokémon (without being consumed).

In Generation I, a Pokémon that wakes up is not able to attack during that same turn; from Generation II onward, a Pokémon can wake up and use a move during the same turn. In Generation V only, a Pokémon's sleep counter is reset to its original amount when switched out; this also applies for self-induced sleep.

In Pokémon Legends: Arceus, this status condition is absent. Moves that would otherwise cause freezing inflict drowsiness instead.

In the spin-off games

Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series

Main article: Status condition (Mystery Dungeon)

In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series, Infatuation prevents the Pokémon from doing anything for 5-6 turns, and causes linked moves to cease.

The Flinch status is known as the Cringe in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team, Blue Rescue Team, Explorers of Time, Explorers of Darkness and Explorers of Sky, and Gates to Infinity. It is renamed as the flinch status condition in Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon.

Pokémon Conquest

In Pokémon Conquest, all status conditions disappear after battle.

In this game, confusion is a non-volatile status. A confused Pokémon may randomly move and attack other Pokémon, including allies. If a Pokémon moves in its confusion, the Warrior is prevented from using an item or activating a Warrior Skill that turn. Confusion may wear off in the first turn.

In this game, a Pokémon that has flinched is unable to perform any actions (i.e. move around, use moves), along with its partner Warrior (i.e. use Warrior Skills, use items, link). Since battles in this game are turn-based, flinching does not require a first strike via an advantage in Speed or priority, unlike in the main series. The turn-based gameplay and the duration of flinching also makes consecutive flinching impairment impossible, unlike in the main series.

In other languages

Language Title
Chinese Cantonese 異常狀態 Yihsèuhng Johngtaai
Mandarin 異常狀態 / 异常状态 Yìcháng Zhuàngtài
The Netherlands Flag.png Dutch Staatusconditie
Finland Flag.png Finnish Statustila
French Canada Flag.png Canada Problème d'état*
France Flag.png Europe Problème de statut
Germany Flag.png German Statusprobleme
Italy Flag.png Italian Problema di stato
South Korea Flag.png Korean 상태 이상 Sangtae Isang
Norway Flag.png Norwegian Statusproblem
Poland Flag.png Polish Zmiana statusu
Portugal Flag.png Portuguese Problema de estado
Russia Flag.png Russian Особый состояние Osobyy sostoyaniye
Spain Flag.png Spanish Problema de estado
Sweden Flag.png Swedish Statusproblem
Vietnam Flag.png Vietnamese Tình trạng bất thường


See also

References


Status conditions
BURNED FROZEN PARALYSIS POISONED
ASLEEP CONFUSION FLINCHING FAINTED


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