Generation V

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Generation V
Pokémon White2 Version
Title screen of Pokémon White Version 2
Debut EN March 4, 2011
JA September 18, 2010
Pokémon 649 (156 new)
Main games Black and White, Black 2 and White 2
Region(s) introduced Unova
Storage games Dream Radar
Side games Rumble Blast, Learn with Pokémon: Typing Adventure, PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond, Conquest, Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity, Rumble U
End EN October 12, 2013 (953 days)
JA October 12, 2013 (1120 days)

The fifth generation (Japanese: 第五世代 fifth generation) of Pokémon, commonly referred to by fans as Generation V (Japanese: 世代 Generation V), is the fifth installment of the Pokémon series. Like previous generations, the first installments, Pokémon Black and White, were released as a pair. However, unlike previous generations, the games were followed by two sequels—Pokémon Black 2 and White 2—instead of a third version. For the first time since Generations I and II (following the internal identification of Pokémon Gold and Silver rather than the advertised console), the games were released on the same platform as the previous generation's core series titles, in this case the Nintendo DS.

Unova, the new region introduced in this generation, is known to be far away from the regions of previous generations. Unlike the past four, Unova is based on an area outside of Japan, drawing inspiration from the New York City metropolitan area.

The Generation V games are able to communicate with the five Generation IV games in the same way that the Generation IV games can communicate with the five Generation III games, with players able to transfer Pokémon via a method similar to Pal Park. Pokémon caught in a Generation III game are able to move forward to Generation V by passing through Generation IV games.

Black and White occur several years after Generation II and Generation IV. The Team Rocket Grunt who stole the Machine Part makes a cameo appearance, saying that while he had intended to revive Team Rocket upon returning home, he instead fell in love and had a son. Cynthia mentions visiting the Distortion World and being defeated by a young Trainer as Sinnoh League Champion.

Black 2 and White 2 occur two years after the events of Black and White.

Advances in gameplay

Being the first games on the same console as their predecessors since Generation II, the Generation V games enhance the Pokémon experience on the DS in several ways. Advancements introduced in Generation V include:

  • The addition of 156 new Pokémon, bringing the total to 649. No new evolutionary relatives of previous Pokémon are introduced, and in Black and White, no Pokémon from previous generations can be caught in Unova itself until after the National Pokédex is obtained.
  • The addition of 92 new moves, bringing the total to 559.
  • The addition of 41 new Abilities, bringing the total to 164. Many older Pokémon are allowed to have new Abilities, including some that were introduced in Generation III and Generation IV, by transferring them from the Dream World. This effectively gives most Pokémon three legitimate Abilities, rather than the two which have been standard since Generation III.
  • Yet another region to explore, the Unova region, far away from the previous four and based on New York City, rather than on a region of Japan.
  • A new villainous team, Team Plasma, whose goals include separating the worlds of Pokémon and humans to make a black and white world.
  • Triple Battles and Rotation Battles are now a part of gameplay, which are variations of battling like Double Battles.
  • The introduction of the Wonder Launcher, a new battle mode which can stack with double, triple and Rotation Battles.
  • The introduction of dark grass, where Double Battles against wild Pokémon can occur.
  • The introduction of phenomena, occurrences which involve wild Pokémon or items moving and making sounds to indicate their position, somewhat similar to the Poké Radar.
  • The introduction of seasons, which alternate every month.
  • Camera placement is more varied, making the cities and towns of Unova more realistic and lifelike. There are also curves in places like Castelia City, Dragonspiral Tower, and the Skyarrow Bridge.
  • The Poké Mart is now combined with the Pokémon Center.
  • Introduction of the Entralink, which allows players to visit each other in-game in Black and White, rather than just inside of the Union Room or the Underground.
  • The new Pokémon Global Link, which allows players to connect their games to the internet to view statistics or download changes to the games, such as the design of the Pokédex. This also grants players access to the Pokémon Dream World, where players may befriend Pokémon and send them over to their games.
  • The weather and current time are now displayed on the bottom screen during battle when making selections as to what to do during the turn.
  • One new variant of Poké Ball, the Dream Ball, retaining the 25 found in previous games.
    • The Apricorn Poké Balls and the Sport Ball are inaccessible without hacking and do not function as Poké Balls even if acquired; however, Pokémon caught in these Poké Balls in HeartGold and SoulSilver retain them when sent to a Generation V game.
  • Pokémon battle sprites now animate constantly, rather than simply animating upon exiting a Poké Ball as in previous generations. These animations are reminiscent of those of Pokémon Crystal, rather than the two-sprite distortion method that has been the standard since Pokémon Emerald.
    • Unlike the animated models from 3D games, these sprites' animations play on a loop and do not depend on a given Pokémon's current actions.
    • The speed at which Pokémon move slows as the HP goes down and with most status conditions (frozen Pokémon do not move at all).
    • When a Pokémon is affected by a status condition, in addition to slowing movement, it also glows a color depending on the status condition. Sleep does not have a color, but uses a different sprite that depicts the Pokémon with its eyes closed.
  • The back sprites of Pokémon show the Pokémon's body in full, with their poses and animations being the same as the front sprite, but as seen from behind.
    • This enables dynamic camera movements during battle, e.g. the camera may zoom in or out and focus on specific Pokémon as the battle progresses.
    • It also allows Mawile to face the audience when it performs in a Pokémon Musical without the need of an additional sprite.
  • A pair of sequels to its original games were introduced.
  • The battle music changes under certain conditions. When one of the player's Pokémon or an ally NPC's Pokémon in battle has 20% or less HP remaining, the music changes to a faster, more suspenseful track. When battling a Gym Leader's last Pokémon, the music also changes.
  • The overworld music also changes in certain circumstances. Almost all the routes now have instruments that differ between the seasons and layers that activate and deactivate when the player walks or stops, respectively. Music that plays in some towns and cities has layers that can be added by talking to citizens. These people can be seen playing different musical instruments like piano, guitar, etc.
  • In the Japanese version of the game, the option to display kanji in game menus and text is available, in addition to hiragana and katakana as in the previous four generations.
  • In international versions of the game, Pokémon names are displayed with proper capitalization, rather than having all capital letters, as it was prior to Generation V.
  • The number of boxes in the Pokémon Storage System has been increased from 18 to 24. However, players initially start with only 8 boxes. After placing one Pokémon in each of the 8 boxes, they will receive an additional 8 boxes, for a total of 16. After placing one Pokémon in each of the 16 boxes, they will finally receive their last 8 boxes, for a total of 24 and a storage total of 720 Pokémon.
  • TMs have expanded from 92 to 95. Many of the 92 TMs found in Generation IV contain different moves.
    • In addition, TMs now have infinite uses, like HMs.
      • To prevent repeated usage of TMs for the purpose of PP restoration, when a Pokémon forgets a move in order to learn from a TM or HM, the move learned takes on the current PP of the move replaced (up to its own maximum).
  • The number of HMs has been reduced from eight to six. The first four remain the same as during the first four generations; HM05 is now Waterfall and HM06 is now Dive.
  • The trading process has been upgraded: players may now trade Pokémon directly from their PC boxes, without having to place offered Pokémon in their party first. The Global Terminal also allows players to trade using this method. Furthermore, players can trade outside of the Pokémon Center via infrared.
  • Key Item registration has been expanded. Multiple items, and even several menu screens, may be registered simultaneously. Pressing the Y button now brings up a quick access menu of the registered commands.
  • While the framerate for the overworld is still 30, the framerate has been increased to 60 for battles, the title screen, and 2D menus. However, the opening movie only has a framerate of 15.
  • When Pokémon are sent out, there is a sound effect and visual effect as they land which varies depending on the weight of the Pokémon. These effects do not apply for Pokémon that stay airborne, like Hydreigon, Ho-Oh, or Goldeen; or for Diglett and Dugtrio.

Alterations from Generation IV

  • The ???-type does not exist in this generation. Instead, Curse is now a Ghost-type move.
  • Rotom's appliance forms are now no longer Ghost-type Pokémon; instead, they are Electric and the type of their special move.
  • Team previews were added to Link battles.
  • Pokémon Super Contests and the Pokéathlon do not appear in favor of the Pokémon Musical, a different type of competition which does not factor in a Pokémon's moves.
  • Seals and Ball Capsules are no longer available for use on Poké Balls.
  • Pokémon in the party can no longer follow the player outside of battle in any point of the game.
  • Encounter rates no longer differ based on the time of day.
  • The option to have the Running Shoes on at all times, as in HeartGold and SoulSilver, has been removed.
  • In the Wi-Fi Club, there is no longer an option to set all Pokémon at level 100.
  • Items are displayed in a list format rather than the six-cell pages that were seen in HeartGold and SoulSilver.
  • Record mixing is no longer a feature.
  • Game Corners do not appear.
  • The persistent bottom-screen menu from Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver is no longer present, as that screen now displays the C-Gear. The menu is brought up on the touch screen in the same way, though, with X.
  • The way some Key Items are used, such as the Dowsing Machine, has been altered.
  • Poison no longer inflicts damage outside the battle.
  • Badges are no longer necessary in order to use HM field moves.
  • The Elite Four may be challenged in any order.
  • Wild Shiny Pokémon no longer sparkle upon breaking out of a Poké Ball.
  • Many Pokémon have their experience yield changed, which is no longer limited to 255.
    • Additionally, the experience formula now accounts for the difference between the level of the Pokémon defeated and the Pokémon receiving experience.
  • In the Vs. Recorder's Browse Mode, it is no longer possible to change the interface's color to the previous color in the line by tapping the left border of the touch screen. Tapping either border will change it to the next color in the sequence.
  • Nintendo DSi systems connected to an Internet router requiring the "advanced setup" option are now compatible with online features, such as the Global Terminal.
  • Battle-only forms, such as Cherrim's Sunshine Form or Castform's weather forms now use their own minisprites, rather than using default form's minisprite. Additionally, Cherrim's Sunshine Form minisprite is different than the one used in HeartGold and SoulSilver.
  • The HP bar now empties as soon as the move animation ends, simultaneous to the animation of the Pokémon's body "blinking" between visible and invisible. Previously, the HP bar did not empty until after the "blinking" animation had finished.
    • Additionally in Double Battles (and Triple Battles) when move hits multiple targets, the HP bar now empties for all Pokémon at once rather one by one - first on player's side, then on opposing side. Due to this, messages have been changed to include the Pokémon (e.g. A critical hit on the foe's <Pokémon>! or It's super effective on <Pokémon> and <Pokémon>!).
    • If a multi-target move misses one opponent (for any reason) but hits another, a <Pokémon> avoided the attack! message will appear first (if it was due to something else than immunity or protecting itself, otherwise the usual message like It doesn't affect <Pokémon>... appears), before the move's animation executes, and the missed Pokémon will not react to the animation.
  • When an Ability is activated during battle, it is shown as a green-blue arrow for the player's side or a red-yellow arrow on the opposing side with the text <Pokémon>'s <ability> instead showing it activated on the battle text. (e.g. Pikachu's Static and the message The foe's Meowth is paralyzed! instead of Pikachu's Static paralyzed the foe's Meowth! on the battle text). This has been changed to a black arrow for both sides in Black and White 2. Additionally, if the Ability is changed, the arrow appears, reflecting the Ability change that took place.
  • Pokémon sprites can be as large as 96 by 96 pixels, although most sprites are still smaller than 80 by 80.
  • During breeding, offspring now have an 80% chance to have the Ability slot corresponding to their mother, unless it is a Hidden Ability; for example, Venomoth with Shield Dust is more likely to breed Venonat with Compoundeyes than with Tinted Lens.
  • Ninetales's EV yield was changed from 1 Special Attack and 1 Special Defense to 1 Special Defense and 1 Speed. Sky Forme Shaymin's was changed from 3 HP to 3 Speed.

Additions in Black 2 and White 2

Region

Unova

Unova
Main article: Unova

Like previous generations, another new region, the Unova region, is introduced in Pokémon Black and White. Unlike the previous four regions, which are relatively close in respect to one another, Unova has been revealed to be distant from them, with the only ways to travel between it and the other four being by boat or airplane.

First partner Pokémon

The first partner Pokémon of the Unova region, like the first partner Pokémon of the previous four regions, follow the Grass-Fire-Water trio, with Snivy the Grass-type, Tepig the Fire-type, and Oshawott the Water-type.

495Snivy B2W2.png
Snivy
498Tepig B2W2.png
Tepig
501Oshawott B2W2.png
Oshawott
Grass Fire Water
Servine Servine Pignite Pignite Dewott Dewott
Grass Fire Fighting Water
Serperior Serperior Emboar Emboar Samurott Samurott
Grass Fire Fighting Water

Gym Leaders

Black and White
Unova League
Generation V Region: Unova
Gym Leader
Japanese
Location
Japanese
Type Badge
VSCilan.png
Cilan
デント Dent
VSChili.png
Chili
ポッド Pod
VSCress.png
Cress
コーン Corn
Striaton City
サンヨウシティ
Sanyou City
Grass Fire Water Trio Badge.png
Trio Badge
{{{size}}}
Lenora
アロエ Aloe
Nacrene City
シッポウシティ
Shippou City
Normal Basic Badge.png
Basic Badge
{{{size}}}
Burgh
アーティ Arty
Castelia City
ヒウンシティ
Hiun City
Bug Insect Badge.png
Insect Badge
{{{size}}}
Elesa
カミツレ Kamitsure
Nimbasa City
ライモンシティ
Raimon City
Electric Bolt Badge.png
Bolt Badge
{{{size}}}
Clay
ヤーコン Yakon
Driftveil City
ホドモエシティ
Hodomoe City
Ground Quake Badge.png
Quake Badge
{{{size}}}
Skyla
フウロ Huuro
Mistralton City
フキヨセシティ
Fukiyose City
Flying Jet Badge.png
Jet Badge
{{{size}}}
Brycen
ハチク Hachiku
Icirrus City
セッカシティ
Sekka City
Ice Freeze Badge.png
Freeze Badge
VSDrayden.png
Drayden
シャガ ShagaB
VSIris.png
Iris
アイリス IrisW
Opelucid City
ソウリュウシティ
Souryuu City
Dragon Legend Badge.png

Legend Badge


Black 2 and White 2
Unova League
Generation V Region: Unova
Gym Leader
Japanese
Location
Japanese
Type Badge
{{{size}}}
Cheren
チェレン Cheren
Aspertia City
ヒオウギシティ
Hiougi City
Normal Basic Badge.png
Basic Badge
{{{size}}}
Roxie
ホミカ Homika
Virbank City
タチワキシティ
Tachiwaki City
Poison Toxic Badge.png
Toxic Badge
{{{size}}}
Burgh
アーティ Arty
Castelia City
ヒウンシティ
Hiun City
Bug Insect Badge.png
Insect Badge
{{{size}}}
Elesa
カミツレ Kamitsure
Nimbasa City
ライモンシティ
Raimon City
Electric Bolt Badge.png
Bolt Badge
{{{size}}}
Clay
ヤーコン Yakon
Driftveil City
ホドモエシティ
Hodomoe City
Ground Quake Badge.png
Quake Badge
{{{size}}}
Skyla
フウロ Huuro
Mistralton City
フキヨセシティ
Fukiyose City
Flying Jet Badge.png
Jet Badge
{{{size}}}
Drayden
シャガ Shaga
Opelucid City
ソウリュウシティ
Souryuu City
Dragon Legend Badge.png
Legend Badge
{{{size}}}
Marlon
シズイ Shizui
Humilau City
セイガイハシティ
Seigaiha City
Water Wave Badge.png
Wave Badge


Unova thematic motif

The fifth generation of Pokémon games focuses on the relationships between opposites, such as between nature and industry or between humans and Pokémon. This comes from the concept of yin and yang, which the legendary mascots of Pokémon Black and White, Reshiram and Zekrom, are based on. Reshiram is the mascot of Black and Zekrom is the mascot of White; both are the opposite color to their respective game's color, while previous game mascots had always matched the color associated with their respective games. The Swords of Justice represent this theme as they are trying to prevent Pokémon from losing their natural habitats to human industry. The generation's main antagonists, Team Plasma, demonstrate this theme, as their goal is to separate Pokémon from humans. Some cities reflect this theme by having aesthetic differences depending on the version of the game; two major examples of this are Black City and White Forest, two version-exclusive locations. The Dream World, which is supposed to combine dreams and reality, also fits into this theme.

Reception

Generation V is seen as a major departure point for the series. While the preceding generations often adhered to the formula Generation I had established, Generation V did several things differently by setting itself in a region where Pokémon from previous generations could not be caught, putting out dual sequels instead of a single third version, and using a dynamic camera angle with continuously animated Pokémon sprites in battles. Although some of the changes seen in Generation V may have influenced future titles, Generation VI saw further changes, thus establishing that each generation from this point forward could contain features unique to that generation that may be dropped in the future. For example, Generation V is the only generation to date that utilizes seasons.

Title screens

English title screens

Pokémon Black Pokémon White
BlackTitle.png WhiteTitle.png
Pokémon Black 2 Pokémon White 2
Black2Title.png White2Title.png

Japanese title screens

Pokémon Black Pokémon White
Japanese BlackTitle.png Japanese WhiteTitle.png
Pokémon Black 2 Pokémon White 2
Japanese Black2Title.png Japanese White2Title.png

Other Generation V games

Spin-off games released during Generation V include: Pokémon Conquest, Learn with Pokémon: Typing Adventure, PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond, Pokédex 3D, Pokédex 3D Pro, Pokédex for iOS, Pokémon Dream Radar, Pokémon Rumble Blast, Pokémon Rumble U, Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity, Pokémon Say Tap?, Pokémon Tretta, and Pokémon Tretta Lab.

Trivia

  • The Japanese logo of the Pokémon games was redesigned once again for Generation V's releases; the first logo was used in Generations I and II, and the second logo was used during Generations III and IV.
    • The text for the English boxes also received a new design.
  • This generation introduced the most new Pokémon to the core series of all generations, with 156 (five more than Generation I introduced).
    • This generation also introduced the most Gym Leaders of all generations, with 14.
  • This is the only generation:
    • Whose primary paired versions were released in Europe before North America.
    • To introduce a single-type Pokémon of every type that existed at the time.
    • Where Pikachu is not available without transfer from another generation.
    • Where the battle music changes at low HP.
    • Whose core series games all require a Badge to be able to trade.
    • To introduce a pair of sequels to its original games.
    • To not introduce a Rock- or Psychic-type specialist.
  • This is the first generation:
    • To introduce a first partner Pokémon trio whose final evolutions have the same base stat total under the current stat system. (The Generation I first partner Pokémon had the same base stat totals in Generation I, but do not under the stat system introduced in Generation II.)
    • To introduce a pure Flying-type Pokémon, giving each type at least one Pokémon solely of that type.
    • Not to feature Professor Oak or the Kanto region.
    • Not to introduce:
    • In which it is impossible to complete the National Pokédex without transferring Pokémon from a previous generation, even if a player owned all versions in the generation and all event Pokémon were acquired.
    • That allows Korean versions to trade with versions of other languages.
    • In which two sets of player characters were introduced.
    • To name the Gym guide, giving him the name Clyde.
    • To lack either a Safari Zone or a similar concept in any capacity.
  • This is the last generation to introduce a Pokémon with a gender ratio of three males to one female, which is the Timburr evolutionary family.


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