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Pokémon breeding

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How the game decides what will hatch from Nidoran or Volbeat/Illumise Egg?

Pokémon breeding is a method of obtaining a new Pokémon by producing and hatching an Egg. In the anime, it also refers to Pokémon grooming and caretaking.

In the games

How to breed

Pokémon can be bred by leaving two compatible Pokémon at the Pokémon Day Care in Generation II and beyond, located on Route 34 in Johto, Route 117 in Hoenn, Four Island in the Sevii Islands, Solaceon Town in Sinnoh, Route 3 in Unova and Route 7 in Kalos.

Two Pokémon are compatible if they are of the same species (or share at least one Egg Group) and are of opposite genders; alternatively, breeding is usually still possible as long as one of them is Ditto, even if the other parent is genderless, and in fact, genderless Pokémon can breed only with Ditto. Pokémon in the Undiscovered egg group cannot breed whatsoever, and Ditto cannot breed with itself. In Generation II only, Pokémon with similar IVs cannot breed, due to the likelihood of familial relation.

Breeding rate

The chance of any two Pokémon producing an Egg is determined by their species (two Bulbasaur are the same species, while Bulbasaur and Ivysaur are not) and their Original Trainers. In Generation III or later, the Day-Care Man will describe the two Pokémon's compatibility when the player speaks to him.

Species Original Trainer Quote Chance for Egg
(...with Oval Charm)
Same Different The two seem to get along very well! 70% (88%)
Same Same The two seem to get along. 50% (80%)
Different Different
Different Same The two don't really seem to like each other very much. 20% (40%)
Different Egg Groups, same gender,
or Undiscovered group
The two prefer to play with other Pokémon more than with each other. 0%

The chances of finding an Egg are different in Generation II, and the compatibility can be checked by interacting with the Pokémon themselves instead of with the Day-Care Man.

Species Original Trainer Quote Chance for Egg per step
(equivalent per 256 steps)
Same Different It appears to care for <other Pokémon's nickname>. 0.19% (39.1%)
Same Same It's friendly with <other Pokémon's nickname>. 0.14% (29.2%)
Different Different It's friendly with <other Pokémon's nickname>. 0.1% (22.1%)
Different Same It shows interest in <other Pokémon's nickname>. 0.04% (9.5%)
Different Egg Groups, same gender,
or Undiscovered group
It has no interest in <other's Pokémon nickname>. 0%
Both Pokémon's Defense IVs are the same and
their Special IVs are different by either 0 or 8
It's brimming with energy. 0%

Receiving the Egg

When there are two compatible Pokémon in the Day Care, the game will periodically decide whether the Day-Care Man has found an Egg, with the chances depending on the compatibility of the two Pokémon as detailed in the section above. In Generation III and later, the game determines whether an Egg appears after every 256 steps the player takes, while in Generation II, it checks after every step.

If an Egg was produced, the Day-Care Man will move from his default position so that the player can know he has an Egg.

  • In Generation II, he will appear outside of the Day Care.
  • In Generation III, he will step out of line with the fence.
  • In Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum, he will face the road instead of facing down.
  • In HeartGold and SoulSilver, he will face left or right instead of down and call the player over the Pokégear.
  • In Generation V, he will call out to the player when they are passing by on the road below.
    • In Black and White, however, the Day-Care Man will not call out to the player if the player's party is full, even if he has found an Egg.
  • In Generation VI, he will face the road instead of in towards the Day Care.

The Day-Care Man will hand the player an Egg if he or she replies that they want the Egg and if they have an empty slot in their party. If the player tells the Day-Care Man they do not want the Egg, he will permanently keep it. If the player says they want the Egg but does not have a spare slot, the Day-Care Man will keep it until the player returns, when he will offer it again; otherwise, there is no way to refuse the Egg and receive it later.

What will hatch

After taking enough steps, the Egg will hatch into a level 1 (Generation IV onward) or level 5 (Generation II and III) first-stage Pokémon of the female species' (or non-Ditto parent's) evolutionary chain.

Parents Offspring
Ditto breeding
445Garchomp.png 132Ditto.png 443Gible.png
Garchomp Ditto Gible
Same species breeding
609Chandelure.png 609Chandelure.png 607Litwick.png
Chandelure Chandelure Litwick
Same evolution family breeding
466Electivire.png 125Electabuzz.png 239Elekid.png
Electivire Electabuzz Elekid
Same Egg Group breeding
136Flareon.png 400Bibarel.png 399Bidoof.png
Flareon Bibarel Bidoof
Undiscovered Egg Group breeding
485Heatran.png 485Heatran.png None
Heatran Heatran None
Different Egg Group breeding
430Honchkrow.png 040Wigglytuff.png None
Honchkrow Wigglytuff None
Same gender breeding
403Shinx.png 400Bibarel.png None
Shinx Bibarel None
Gender-counterpart species

There are two pairs of Pokémon families where the male and female are different species. In these cases, an Egg produced may hatch into either the male or female variant. The pairs are the following:

Parents Offspring
Poison Pin Pokémon
029Nidoran.png Nidoran♀
Nidoran♂
Nidoran♀ Any compatible
Pokémon
Nidoran♀
Nidoran♂
032Nidoran.png 132Ditto.png Nidoran♀
Nidoran♂
Nidoran♂ Ditto Nidoran♀
Nidoran♂
Firefly Pokémon
314Illumise.png Volbeat
Illumise
Illumise Any compatible
Pokémon
Volbeat
Illumise
313Volbeat.png 132Ditto.png Volbeat
Illumise
Volbeat Ditto Volbeat
Illumise*
Incense breeding

There are several Pokémon which can produce two different kinds of Eggs, dependent on whether or not a parent of the Egg held a specific incense when it was produced.

Parents Item Offspring
Marill and Azumarill
183Marill.png 184Azumarill.png Sea Incense Azurill
Sea Incense
Marill
No item
Marill Azumarill Azurill
Marill
Wobbuffet
202Wobbuffet.png Lax Incense Wynaut
Lax Incense
Wobbuffet
No item
Wobbuffet Wynaut
Wobbuffet
Roselia and Roserade
315Roselia.png 407Roserade.png Rose Incense Budew
Rose Incense
Roselia
No item
Roselia Roserade Budew
Roselia
Chimecho
358Chimecho.png Pure Incense Chingling
Pure Incense
Chimecho
No item
Chimecho Chingling
Chimecho
Sudowoodo
185Sudowoodo.png Rock Incense Bonsly
Rock Incense
Sudowoodo
No item
Sudowoodo Bonsly
Sudowoodo
Mr. Mime
122Mr. Mime.png Odd Incense Mime Jr.
Odd Incense
Mr. Mime
No item
Mr. Mime Mime Jr.
Mr. Mime
Chansey and Blissey
113Chansey.png 242Blissey.png Luck Incense Happiny
Luck Incense
Chansey
No item
Chansey Blissey Happiny
Chansey
Mantine
226Mantine.png Wave Incense Mantyke
Wave Incense
Mantine
No item
Mantine Mantyke
Mantine
Snorlax
143Snorlax.png Full Incense Munchlax
Full Incense
Snorlax
No item
Snorlax Munchlax
Snorlax
Other

There is one special case, where a Pokémon can produce offspring that cannot evolve into it exclusively, and they are not gender counterparts.

Parents Offspring
Ditto breeding
490Manaphy.png 132Ditto.png 489Phione.png
Manaphy Ditto Phione

Hatching Eggs

The time it takes for Eggs to hatch depends on the Pokémon's species' required number of Egg cycles. Magikarp is the fastest hatching Pokémon with the fewest Egg cycles required for hatching. Some baby Pokémon in the Undiscovered Egg Group, such as Cleffa, Pichu and Igglybuff, hatch quickly as well. Besides these, most Pokémon take considerable time to hatch. Rare and powerful Pokémon, like Dratini, Bagon, Beldum, Larvitar, Gible, Aerodactyl, Snorlax, Spiritomb, Chansey, and Eevee, among others, take a long time to hatch due to high numbers of Egg cycles required for hatching.

"Time" is actually determined by Egg cycle completion, which is determined by in-game steps or biking. An Egg cycle is a counted number of steps that activate breeding related programs in the game. One Egg cycle lasts 256 steps in the third generation and 255 steps in the fourth generation. After 255/256 steps are taken, the game recognizes the completion of the cycle and does a few things; the step counter for the cycles is reset to zero, the game randomly decides if an Egg is to be found at the Day Care (if compatible Pokémon are present in the Day Care at the time), and all (or only a few) Eggs currently in the player's team are taken down one Egg cycle count. If the Egg cycle count for an Egg reaches zero or a negative number, the Egg will begin to hatch. If an Egg hatches, the game stops subtracting an Egg cycle count from the rest of the Eggs in the team. Due to this, since the third generation, no two Eggs can hatch at the same time.

The other way to reset the game counter is to receive an Egg from the Day-Care Man (or in the Manaphy Egg's case, from the Mystery Gift delivery man in the Poké Mart). Every time an Egg is received, the game automatically resets the Egg cycle step counter to zero, and counts as another Egg cycle completion. This can effectively cut 254 (255 in the third generation) steps off the Egg hatching process for every Egg accepted from the Day-Care Man (the Egg must be accepted, not rejected or denied due to a full team to reset the step counter). Although this detracts an Egg cycle from the Eggs, any Eggs ready to hatch upon this type of Egg cycle completion will be denied the ability to hatch until the next Egg cycle completion by steps, perhaps due to the dialogue between the player and the Day-Care Man following the pickup of an Egg.

For example, a Gligar Egg requires 21 Egg cycles to hatch, a minimum of 5355 steps if not interrupted by an Egg hatching or Egg pickup. After each Egg cycle is completed, this Egg will drop one Egg cycle count, down to 20, then 19, then 18, so on and so forth until the Egg count hits zero. If nothing restricts the Egg from hatching, the Egg will hatch into Gligar. If it is restricted, it will continue dropping into the negative numbers from the Egg cycles, and will continue to try hatching if the Egg is stopped from another Egg pickup.

There are ways to speed this system up. Riding a Bicycle would reduce the Egg's actual hatching time by increasing the step count faster, thus completing Egg cycles faster. From Pokémon Emerald onward, if a Pokémon with Flame Body or Magma Armor is in a player's party, it doubles the Egg cycle count reduction, effectively halving the steps needed to hatch the Egg. In the Gligar example, the Egg would start at 21, and with Slugma in the party, the Egg would drop 2 Egg cycle counts after each Egg cycle, from 21 to 19 to 17 and so on. Multiple Pokémon with either abilities will not increase the Egg cycle reduction. Pokémon Black and White introduced the Pass Power Hatching Power, which increases the Egg hatch rate by 1.25×, 1.5×, or 2×, depending on the level used. Pokémon X and Y also has the Hatching Power, but instead as an O-Power. Hatching Power can also stack with the effects of either Flame Body or Magma Armor, allowing the player to further speed up hatching time.

Passing moves down

The moves obtained by a Pokémon when hatching are as follows:

  • By default, the baby Pokémon will start with any moves that it learns at level 1. (In Generation II and Generation III, they knew all moves that are level 5 and below in their learnset.)
  • If both parents know a move that the baby can learn via leveling up, the Pokémon will inherit that move.
  • Prior to Generation VI, if the father knows any TM or HM moves (and in Crystal, Move Tutor moves) that the baby is also compatible with, it will inherit the move. If a genderless Pokémon breeds with Ditto, the resultant baby will inherit any compatible TM or HM moves that the genderless non-Ditto Pokémon parent knows.
  • If the father or (starting in Generation VI) the mother knows any specific Egg moves that the baby can learn, the baby will inherit the move. If the parents both know different Egg moves, the father's Egg moves are passed on first, then followed by the mother's.
  • From Pokémon Emerald onward, for a baby Pichu, if either parent is holding a Light Ball, the Pichu will know Volt Tackle. Volt Tackle cannot be passed down as a normal Egg move.

If this would result in the baby possessing more than four moves, the moves take priority in the order listed: Volt Tackle, mother's Egg moves, father's Egg moves, TM and HM moves, inherited level-up moves, baby's default moveset. The moves passed down will be ordered on the baby Pokémon by the priority listed above.

Inheriting stats

A Pokémon's individual values are also passed down. This is determined differently between generations.

Generation II

In Generation II games, the baby inherits its stats from the parent of the opposite gender, unless one parent is Ditto, and in that case it inherits the stats from Ditto. The Defense IV is passed, and also either the Special IV or the Special IV plus or minus 8 (plus for values in the 0-7 range; minus for values in the 8-15 range); the Special IV has a 50% chance of remaining the same. Attack and Speed IVs are determined entirely at random, whereas HP is determined by the IVs of the other four stats, using the same formula for wild Pokémon. The probability of a Pokémon having the same IVs as its opposite-gender parent is therefore 1/512.

If the Defense IVs of two partners are the same, and the Special IVs are either the same or differ by 8, they are incompatible. This is due to the high likelihood of a family relation, hence the inability to breed.

Generation III

In Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, FireRed and LeafGreen, exactly three of the baby's IVs are inherited from its parents (e.g. if one parent contributes two IVs, its mate will contribute the third). The other three are determined at random, though it is possible that some of these may coincide with those of its parents without actually being inherited.

In Pokémon Emerald, the process is similar but more complicated. First, a random IV is passed from one of the parents to the baby. Afterwards, a random IV of any stat (other than HP) is passed from either parent to the baby; if it is the same stat (not necessarily the same IV value, depending on whether or not the same parent passed it on), it will override it. Finally, another random IV of any stat other than HP and Defense is passed from one of the parents to the baby; this IV will override any of the previous two if it is from the same stat. The remaining stats (a number ranging from 3 to 5) are determined at random, again with the possibility of one or more IVs coinciding with those of the parents.

Generation IV

Inheriting IVs in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl is determined in the same way as in Pokémon Emerald.

From Pokémon Platinum on, the baby will inherit three IVs, each from a different stat and from a random parent. In addition, now if either or both parents hold an EV-enhancing item (excluding the Macho Brace), the baby will instead receive the IV of the corresponding stat from one of those parents, then inheriting two other random IVs each from a random parent. For example, if a parent is holding the Power Anklet, the baby will inherit the Speed IV from that parent, and it will also inherit two other different IVs from its parents, such as Attack and Special Defense. As another example, if one parent holds a Power Anklet and the other parent holds a Power Weight, the baby will inherit either the Speed IV from the first parent or the HP IV from the second parent, and it will also inherit two different IVs from its parents other than Speed or HP. This system is retained in HeartGold and SoulSilver.

Generation V

Inheriting IVs in Generation V is determined in the same way as in Pokémon Platinum, HeartGold and SoulSilver.

Generation VI

From Pokémon X and Y onward, if at least one parent holds a Destiny Knot, the baby will inherit five IVs instead of three.

This can be combined with an EV-enhancing item to ensure that one desired IV is always inherited; however, the offspring will still inherit only a total of five IVs from its parents (one from the EV-enhancing item and four from the Destiny Knot).

Inheriting Natures

In Pokémon Emerald, if the mother (in a male-female pair) or Ditto (in a pair that includes Ditto) is holding an Everstone, the baby has a 50% chance of inheriting that Pokémon's Nature.

In Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum, inheriting Natures remains the same as in Emerald, except that passing on Natures via an Everstone will not work if the Pokémon are from different real-world countries (e.g. Argentina and Spain).

In HeartGold and SoulSilver, whichever Pokémon is holding an Everstone will have a chance of passing down its Nature, regardless of gender, or whether it is breeding with a Ditto.

In Black and White, inheriting Natures remains the same as in HeartGold and SoulSilver, except that passing on Natures via an Everstone will now work even if the Pokémon are from different real-world countries.

From Black 2 and White 2 onward, if one parent holds an Everstone, its Nature will always be passed down. If both parents are holding an Everstone, a parent's Nature will still always be passed down, but which parent's Nature is passed down is randomly determined.

Inheriting Abilities

050Diglett.png This section is incomplete.
Please feel free to edit this section to add missing information and complete it.
Reason: Chance of Hidden Ability being passed down from a male or genderless Pokémon in Generation VI, and confirmation whether the female hidden ability transfer chance remains the same..

In Black and White, female Pokémon with Hidden Abilities have a 60% chance of passing on the Hidden Ability to their offspring when bred with a male Pokémon from the same Egg Group. For example, if a female Darmanitan with Zen Mode breeds with a male Simisage, the offspring Darumaka may have Inner Focus instead of the usual Hustle, and would evolve into a Darmanitan with Zen Mode (instead of Sheer Force). Hidden Abilities cannot be passed down from male or genderless Pokémon, and will not be passed down if the female was paired with a Ditto.

Starting in Black 2 and White 2, there is an 80% chance that the Ability slot of the female will be passed to the baby. For example, when breeding a female Pinsir with Hyper Cutter, the resultant Pinsir has an 80% chance of having Hyper Cutter rather than Mold Breaker. This chance does not apply if Ditto is used as either parent.

In Generation VI, any Pokémon, including male and genderless Pokémon, can pass down their Hidden Ability when bred with Ditto. Ditto's Ability is irrelevant to inheritance. If the male is bred with another Pokémon from the same egg group, Hidden Abilities will not be passed down.

Inheriting Poké Balls

Prior to Generation VI, all hatched Pokémon are obtained in a standard red-and-white Poké Ball.

Starting in Generation VI, the Poké Ball of the female Pokémon (other than a Master Ball and Cherish Ball, which result in the default standard Poké Ball) will be passed down to its offspring. Male and genderless Pokémon (including Ditto) have no impact on the type of Poké Ball inherited; as such, when breeding a male or genderless Pokémon with Ditto (which is the only way to breed certain species), the offspring is always obtained in a standard Poké Ball.

Breeding for Shininess

050Diglett.png This section is incomplete.
Please feel free to edit this section to add missing information and complete it.
Reason: Generation VI.

Generation II

In Generation II, due to Shininess being determined by IVs and the fact that IVs are passed down through breeding, it is possible for an Egg bred from a Shiny Pokémon to have a chance as high as 1/64 of being Shiny itself, but only if the offspring is of the opposite gender as the Shiny parent. This is not possible in any later generations due to Shininess no longer being related to IVs.

Generation III

In Generation III, a bred Pokémon always has the same chance of being Shiny as any Pokémon met in the wild.

Generation IV

In Generation IV, there is now a 5/8192 (~1/1639) chance of hatching a Shiny Pokémon when the parents are from games from different countries, a five times increase of the usual rate. This mechanic is known as the Masuda method, after Junichi Masuda.

Generation V

In Generation V, the Masuda method's success rate increased from 5/8192 (~1/1639) to 6/8192 (~1/1366).

In Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, the Shiny Charm was introduced, which if owned by the player will increase the chance of encountering or hatching a Shiny Pokémon by a flat 2/8192, to 3/8192 (~1/2731) for a regularly bred Pokémon, or 8/8192 (1/1024) if the parents are from games from different countries.

Generation VI

In Generation VI, the Masuda method's success rate when combined with the Shiny Charm is increased to 1/512.

In the anime

In the anime, Pokémon breeding refers to an entire line of work practiced by Pokémon Breeders, such as Brock. So far, the anime has shown and discussed little about the literal breeding of Pokémon to produce Eggs, but it is assumed this is part of a Pokémon Breeder's work. It has been shown that Professors get their starter Pokémon from breeders who specifically raise and breed them, like Old Man Swamp from A Mudkip Mission. There are also a few farm-like facilities that produce Pokémon Eggs of various species. Ash received his Eggs from such locations, as did May and her Egg.

Pokémon breeding in the anime focuses heavily on raising healthy Pokémon and keeping them in top condition by grooming them well and feeding them nutritious food.

Trivia

  • Some unusual pairings of Pokémon can be found within the Egg Groups, such as Seviper and Zangoose (which are even said to be mortal enemies), and the most famous pairing Skitty and Wailord. However, the characters in the game make special mention of the fact that no one has seen Pokémon breed.
  • Nidorina and Nidoqueen cannot breed, despite the fact that their pre-evolution Nidoran♀ and the Nidoran♂ line can.
  • Although Legendary Pokémon except Manaphy (and debatably Phione) cannot breed in the core series games, Eggs containing Articuno, Zapdos and Moltres can be hatched in Pokémon Snap and a baby Lugia has been seen in the anime. Likewise, Manaphy can be hatched from a special Egg from Pokémon Ranger in the Generation IV games.
  • When a Pokémon hatches from an Egg during both Generation II and Generation III, it is at level 5. However, many Pokémon from the wild can be found between levels 2 and 4, which is below the level of newly hatched Pokémon. This oddity had since been addressed from Generation IV onwards, where all hatched Pokémon start at level 1.
  • The Pokémon Mansion journals (which predate Generation II's introduction of breeding) describe Mew giving birth as opposed to producing an Egg. These were not changed in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. It is unclear as to whether this is meant literally or metaphorically.
  • In gen VI an old man on a bench in Coumarine city says "So those Egg-like things that are found at the Pokemon Day Care. Strictly speaking, they're not Eggs. They're more like a Pokemon cradle.

External links


Pokémon training
CatchingNicknameBattlesEvolution (Mega Evolution) • Trading (Outsiders) • BreedingReleasing


Project Games logo.png This game mechanic article is part of Project Games, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon games.