2019 World Championships

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The 2019 Pokémon World Championships was held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. from August 16 to 19, 2019. It was the sixteenth invitation-only championships for players of the Pokémon Trading Card Game, the eleventh for players of the Pokémon video games, and the fourth for players of Pokkén Tournament. The championships featured a share of over $500,000 in prizes. It is the second time that Washington, D.C. held the competition, having previously held the 2014 World Championships.

Invitations for the Trading Card Game and the video game events were awarded to players who accumulated enough Championship Points throughout the season. Invitations for Pokkén Tournament were awarded to the top placements at three International Championships and players from Japan. There were also Last Chance Qualifiers held on Friday for Pokkén Tournament.

Trading Card Game Championships

The Pokémon Trading Card Game will feature the 2018-19 Standard format, using all cards from Sun & Moon onward. Players received invitations from gaining enough Championship Points throughout the year or from the previous year's World Championships.

Junior Division

Naohito Inoue of Japan was the defending champion but became eligible for the Seniors Division in 2019. He did not advance to Day Two, finishing with a record of 4-3.

Haruki Miyamoto of Japan became the new World Champion with a record of 8-1-1.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Logan Maracle United States  
8  Hotaru Yoshinari Japan  
    1  Logan Maracle United States  
    5  Haruki Miyamoto Japan  
5  Haruki Miyamoto Japan
4  Mitchell Ransome United States  
    5  Haruki Miyamoto United States
    7  Isaac Terceira United States
3  Daniel Magda Czech Republic  
6  Cássio Moraes Brazil  
    6  Cássio Moraes Brazil
    7  Isaac Terceira United States  
7  Isaac Terceira United States
2  Sechan Oh South Korea  


Senior Division

Magnus Pedersen of Denmark was the defending champion but was eligible for the Masters Division in 2019. He earned an invitation to Day Two where he finished 73rd.

Kaya Lichtleitner of Germany became the new World Champion with a final record of 8-0-2.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Iain Harding United States  
8  Thomas Naylor United Kingdom  
    8  Thomas Naylor United Kingdom  
    4  Grant Shen United States  
5  YouTae Woo South Korea
4  Grant Shen United States  
    4  Grant Shen United States
    2  Kaya Lichtleitner Germany
3  Rowan Stavenow Canada  
6  James Cox Australia  
    3  Rowan Stavenow Canada
    2  Kaya Lichtleitner Germany  
7  Noa Bell United States
2  Kaya Lichtleitner Germany  


Masters Division

Robin Schulz of Germany was the defending champion and finished in 20th place.

Henry Brand of Australia became the new World Champion, defeating the 2016 TCG World Champion Shintaro Ito of Japan. Brand finished with a record of 8-1-1.

Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Shintaro Ito Japan  
8  Isaiah Williams United States  
    1  Shintaro Ito Japan  
    4  Tord Reklev Norway  
5  Pacco Saurus Spain
4  Tord Reklev Norway  
    1  Shintaro Ito Japan
    6  Henry Brand United States
3  Kaiwen Cabbabe Australia  
6  Henry Brand United States  
    6  Henry Brand United States
    2  Blaine Hill United States  
7  Ryota Ishiyama Japan
2  Blaine Hill United States  


Video Game Championships

Matches will take place in Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon and will be all Double Battles. All Pokémon except Ash-Greninja and Mythical Pokémon are eligible, given they have an Alola symbol. As with the 2010 and 2016 World Championships, up to two special Pokémon can be used under the GS Cup format. All moves and held items are allowed. Levels for all Pokémon were adjusted to level 50 and no duplicate Pokémon or items were allowed. Players were given seven minutes of move selection time per game.

Junior Division

Wonn Lee of Japan was the defending champion but was eligible for the Senior Division in 2019, where he finished 47th.

Pi Wu of Taiwan defeated Teddy French of England to become the first Taiwanese World Champion.

First round   Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Justin Miranda-Radbord Canada  
16  Morgan Lola Yuen Singapore     1  Justin Miranda-Radbord Canada  
8  James Gilbert Australia   9  Teddy French United Kingdom  
9  Teddy Gilbert United Kingdom       9  Teddy French United Kingdom  
4  Pietro Nihal Kaludra Silva Italy       5  Connor Yuen Singapore  
13  Felipe Reyes Castro Chile     13  Felipe Reyes Castro Chile
5  Connor Yuen Singapore   5  Connor Yuen Singapore  
12  Emily Eastham United States       9  Teddy French United Kingdom
2  Pi Wu Taiwan       2  Pi Wu Taiwan
18  Kenneth Fung Canada     2  Pi Wu Taiwan  
7  Sota Tamemasa Japan   7  Sota Tamemasa Japan  
10  Kotaro Isozaki Japan       2  Pi Wu Taiwan
3  Keigo Tatsuma Japan       14  Yuta Nakaue Japan  
14  Yuta Nakaue Japan     14  Yuta Nakaue Japan
6  Masahiro Miyamoto Japan   6  Masahiro Miyamoto Japan  
11  Jaesung Lee South Korea  


Senior Division

James Evans of the United States was the defending champion but was eligible for the Masters Division in 2019. He was knocked out in Round 6 of Day One.

Ko Tsukide of Japan defeated Lewis Tan of Australia to become the new World Champion.

First round   Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Kareem Muakkit United States  
 Received a bye     1  Kareem Muakkit United States  
8  Baik Jongyoon South Korea   8  Baik Jongyoon South Korea  
9  Hidetoshi Asari Japan       8  Baik Jongyoon South Korea  
4  Enzo Reci United States       5  Lewis Tan Australia  
13  Nicholas Kan Australia     4  Enzo Reci United States
5  Lewis Tan United States   5  Lewis Tan Australia  
12  Yuri Shimogauchi Japan       5  Lewis Tan Australia
2  Kenshin Hosoi Japan       3  Ko Tsukide Japan
15  Park Sungmin South Korea     2  Kenshin Hosoi Japan  
7  Lee Junhee South Korea   7  Lee Junhee South Korea  
10  Sorane Ono Japan       2  Kenshin Hosoi Japan
3  Ko Tsukide Japan       3  Ko Tsukide Japan  
14  Sayaka Hosoi Japan     3  Ko Tsukide Japan
6  Alessandro Marchionne Italy   6  Alessandro Marchionne Italy  
11  Ràmi Combette France  


Masters Division

Paul Ruiz of Ecuador was the defending champion. He received an invitation to Day Two but was knocked out in Round 3.

Naoto Mizobuchi of Japan became the new World Champion after defeating the Japanese National Champion Hirofumi Kimura.

First round   Quarterfinals   Semifinals   Championship match
1  Jamie Boyt United Kingdom  
17  Naoto Mizobuchi Japan     17  Naoto Mizobuchi Japan  
8  Eric Rios Spain   8  Eric Rios Spain  
9  Eduardo Cunha Portugal       17  Naoto Mizobuchi Japan  
4  James Baek United States       4  James Baek United States  
13  Brandon Meckley United States     4  James Baek United States
5  Meaghan Rattle Australia   5  Meaghan Rattle Australia  
12  Aaron Traylor United States       17  Naoto Mizobuchi Japan
2  Gabriel Agati Brazil       11  Hirofumi Kimura Japan
15  Kazuki Kobayashi Japan     15  Kazuki Kobayashi Japan  
7  Álex Gomez Spain   7  Álex Gomez Spain  
10  Ryusei Yamane Japan       15  Kazuki Kobayashi Japan
3  Zheyuan Huang United States       11  Hirofumi Kimura Japan  
14  Stephen Mea United States     14  Stephen Mea United States
6  Melvin Keh Singapore   11  Hirofumi Kimura Japan  
11  Hirofumi Kimura Japan  


Pokkén Tournament Championships

Invitations were given out to top placements at the Oceania, Europe, and North America International Championships. Two Senior and four Masters invites were awarded at the Europe and North America Championships each, while the Oceania Championships only awarded one Senior and two Masters invites. The remaining invitations were split between Japanese players and players who made it through the Last Chance Qualifiers.

Pokkén Tournament DX was used for the tournament, with every player required to use their own HORI Pokkén Tournament Pro Pad or HORI Pokkén Tournament DX Pro Pad. The tournament was double elimination and was the Team Battle format, with each match being best three out of five games.

Senior Division

Kato Yusuke of Japan was the defending champion in the Seniors Division and was runner-up for 2019. The previous year's runner-up, Colin "Ashgreninja1" Jones, defeated him to become Pokkén Tournament DX Senior Division Champion.

Winners Semifinals   Winners Final   Grand Final   Reset
 Kato Japan  
 Ashgreninja1 United States      Ashgreninja1 United States  
 YveltalX    YveltalX     Shadow Mewtwo, Aegislash, Mewtwo  Ashgreninja1 United States      N/A  
 Kotaro Japan     Pikachu Libre, Aegislash, Mewtwo  Kato Japan      N/A  
Losers Quarterfinals   Losers Semifinal   Losers Final
 Kotaro Japan      YveltalX
 Indigomega      Indigomega      Kato Japan
 Kato Japan    Kato Japan  
 Sneezy  

Masters Division

Jacob "ThankSwalot" Waller of the United States was the defending champion in the Masters Division but was knocked out in Top 16. After finishing second in the Last Chance Qualifier, Subutan finished with no losses to become the new Pokkén Tournament DX Masters Division Champion.

Winners Semifinals   Winners Final   Grand Final   Reset
Shadow Mewtwo, Braixen, Decidueye  Tonosama Japan  
Darkrai, Sceptile, Braixen  Shadowcat United States     Shadow Mewtwo, Decidueye, Braixen  Tonosama Japan  
Pikachu Libre, Weavile, Mewtwo  Potetin Japan   Pikachu Libre, Braixen, Aegislash  Subutan Japan     Chandelure/Aegislash, Braixen, Pikachu Libre  Subutan Japan      N/A  
Chandelure, Pikachu Libe, Braixen  Subutan Japan     Pikachu Libre, Aegislash, Darkrai  Haruyuki Japan      N/A  
Losers Quarterfinals   Losers Semifinal   Losers Final
Darkrai, Sceptile, Braixen  Shadowcat United States     Aegislash, Pikachu Libre, Darkrai  Haruyuki Japan
Pikachu Libre, Aegislash, Darkrai  Haruyuki Japan     Aegislash, Pikachu Libre, Darkrai  Haruyuki Japan     Shadow Mewtwo, Braixen, Decidueye  Tonosama Japan
Pikachu Libre, Weavile, Mewtwo  Potetin Japan   Pikachu Libre, Weavile, Mewtwo  Potetin Japan  
Decidueye, Mewtwo, Shadow Mewtwo  Sarutaro Japan  

Pokémon GO Invitational Tournament

An invitational tournament for Pokémon GO was held on the first day of the World Championships. Six competitors and Game Freak's Junichi Masuda and Shigeki Morimoto competed in Trainer Battles against each other in a double elimination tournament. The Great League was utilized and each match was best three out of five games.

Winners Semifinals   Winners Final   Grand Final   Reset
3  PogoKieng Canada  
0  Carrymeh United States     1  PogoKieng Canada  
0  Strawburry17 United States   3  Poké AK United States     2  Poké AK United States   0  Poké AK United States
3  Poké AK United States     3  PogoKieng Canada   3  PogoKieng Canada
Losers Quarterfinals   Losers Semifinal   Losers Final
3  Carrymeh United States     0  Carrymeh United States
0  Yamada Japan     3  Carrymeh United States     3  PogoKieng Canada
2  Strawburry17 United States   0  Shigeki Morimoto Japan  
3  Shigeki Morimoto Japan  

Event Pokémon

#142 Aerodactyl /
Cherish Ball summary IV.png Level 50 142Aerodactyl.png
Type:
Rock Flying
Ability: Unnerve
Held item: Rare Bone Rare Bone
ID: 081619
OT: Worlds19
Met: WCS 2019 (fateful encounter)
Nature: Random
Ribbon: Event Ribbon Event Ribbon
Ancient Power
Rock Special
Rock Polish
Rock Status
Wide Guard
Rock Status
Celebrate
Normal Status
Games Method Region Location Duration
SMUSUM local wireless all Walter E. Washington Convention Center Halls D & E, Washington, DC, United States August 16 to 18, 2019
Moves in bold can be taught again at the Move Reminder as a special move if forgotten.
Date received is the date on the system when the gift is picked up from the deliveryman.
This Pokémon is set to the same language as the game that received it.

Trivia

  • Isaac Terceira, upon recieveing their Runner-up winner trophy; started to walk away holding the trophy when the silver cup broke off. He got the trophy fixed up moments afterward.

External links


Pokémon World Championships
Pokémon Trading Card Game only 2004-2008; TCG and Video Games 2009-on
2004: Blaziken TechMagma SpiritRocky BeachTeam Rushdown
2005: Bright AuraDark TyranitarKing of the WestQueendom
2006: B-L-SEeveelutionsMewtrickSuns & Moons
2007: FlyveesLegendary AscentRamboltSwift Empoleon
2008: Bliss ControlEmpotechIntimidationPsychic Lock
2009: StallgonCrowned TigerQueengarLuxdrill
2010: LuxChomp of the SpiritHappy LuckPower CottonweedBoltevoir
2011: MegazoneReshiphlosionThe TruthTwinboar
2012: Pesadelo PrismTerraki-MewtwoEeltwoCMT
2013: Anguille Sous RocheAmerican GothicDarkraiUltimate Team Plasma
2014: Plasma PowerTrevgorEmerald KingCrazy Punch
2015: The Flying HammerPunches 'n' BitesHonorStoisePrimal Groudon
2016: Black DragonBebe DeckMagical SymphonyNinja Blitz
2017: Infinite ForceGolisodorIce Path FTWSamurai Sniper
2018: Victory MapDragones y SombrasGarbanetteBuzzroc
2019:
Champions Jason KlaczynskiJun HasebeRay Rizzo


Project TCG logo.png This article is part of both Project TCG and Project Games, Bulbapedia projects that, together, aim to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon Trading Card Game and Video Game Championship Tournaments. Project Games logo.png