Appendix:Metagame terminology

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The Pokémon metagame has a wide range of fanmade terminology for various aspects of the games. These are colloquial terms originating from unofficial sources, and are not found within the games themselves.

General terms

6V

Refers to a Pokémon with perfect/maximum individual values in all stats.

Baton Pass chain

Refers to continuous use of the move Baton Pass and the accumulated stat changes.

BST

An abbreviation for base stat total.

Buff

When properties of a Pokémon's stats, movepool, or Ability are changed between games to become more viable. For instance, in Generation VII, Pelipper and Torkoal has the access of Ability Drizzle and Drought, respectively.

Bulky Offense (BO)

A team-building and battling strategy intended to overwhelm the opponent with passively offensive and defensive pressure. Also referred to as "Balanced Offense" or simply "Balance".

Choice lock

Refers to how the held items Choice Band, Choice Scarf, and Choice Specs limit a Pokémon to use only one of its moves. A Pokémon is said to be "Choice locked" into a specific move if forced to use it by a Choice item.

Clause

Clauses refer to the various rules that are applied to battles, such as restrictions on which Pokémon, moves, and items may be used. Many of these rules are found in the games, applied in settings such as battle facilities and multiplayer features.

Baton Pass clause

Refers to measures taken to limiting Baton Pass. This potentially includes limiting a team to only one Pokémon with the move, preventing boosts in Speed from being passed alongside boosts in other stats, or banning the move altogether.

Endless battle clause

Refers to a ban on sets such as Funbro that have the capability of causing a battle with no possible ending. Found in some unofficial formats such as Smogon and Pokémon Online.

Evasion clause

Refers to a ban on moves that raise evasion (such as Double Team). Does not necessarily put a ban on moves that reduce accuracy (such as Sand Attack) or moves/Abilities that merely have a possibility of raising evasion (such as Acupressure/Moody).

Flinch clause

Refers to technical measures to prevent a Pokémon from flinching twice in a row. Found in Pokémon Conquest and some battle simulators.

Freeze clause

Refers to technical measures taken in order to prevent multiple Pokémon on the same team from being frozen at the same time. Found in games like Pokémon Stadium and battle simulators like Pokémon Online.

Item clause

Refers to a ban on multiple Pokémon of the same team holding the same item. Found in battle facilities and officially organized tournaments, but widely ignored in many fan communities.

Moody clause

Refers to a ban on the ability Moody. Common in battle simulators.

OHKOs clause

Refers to a ban on the one-hit knockout moves (Fissure, Horn Drill, Guillotine, and Sheer Cold). Found in some battle simulators.

Species clause

Refers to a ban on the same Pokémon species or National Pokédex number. Widely accepted in the official tournaments and many fan communities.

Sleep clause

Refers to a ban on the usage of sleep-inducing moves when one of the opponent's Pokémon has already been put to sleep by one of the user's Pokémon. As such, the move Rest and the Ability Effect Spore do not violate this ban. Found in Pokémon Battle Revolution and battle simulators like Pokémon Showdown and Pokémon Online.

Swagger clause

Refers to a ban on the move Swagger. Common in battle simulators during Generation VI as a result of sets such as SwagPlay.

Core

Refers to the two or three most important Pokémon in a set, which possess great synergy. The rest of the team is usually suited to supporting the core and dealing with its checks.

Type core

Refers to a team-building and battling strategy that involves the natural offensive and defensive synergy between certain types, usually requires 3 Pokémon with different types. Examples include Fire/Water/Grass core, Steel/Fairy/Dragon core, and Fighting/Psychic/Dark core.

Dry pass

Using the move Baton Pass despite not having any stat boosts. Used to scout out the opponent's switches.

Entry hazard

Main article: List of moves that cause entry hazards

Entry hazard is any battlefield effect that affects the opposing Pokémon as they are sent in the battle.

EVs/IVs

An abbreviation for effort values and individual values. DVs refers to the individual values used in Generation I and II games.

Four moveslot syndrome

A trait a Pokémon possesses if it has more than four equally or similarly viable unique options outside of STAB attacks. Also referred to as "4MSS".

HA

An abbreviation for Hidden Ability, which is initially referred by fandom as "Dream World (DW) Ability".

Hax

Refers to outcomes that are perceived as unlikely to the point of being unfair. Common targets are critical hits, moves missing, flinching, being frozen, the success of additional effects, and full paralysis. Can also refer to reliance on uncertain outcomes, such as the use of one-hit knockout moves or held items like Quick Claw, Focus Band, or Bright Powder. Hax is often associated with the moves Double Team, Minimize, and Swagger, as well as the Abilities Moody and Serene Grace.

HKO

An abbreviation for <number>-hit knockout (2HKO, 3HKO, etc.), referring to the number of hits a Pokémon managed to faint/survive. 1HKO (one-hit knockout) is often associated with the one-hit knockout moves (OHKO moves).

HP <type>

Refers to the move Hidden Power and its type (e.g. HP Ice, HP Fire).

Starting in VGC 2017, players are required to note their Pokémon's Hidden Power move as "HP (<type>)" on team sheets.

Hyper Offense (HO)

A team-building and battling strategy intended to overwhelm the opponent with offensive pressure. Also referred to as "Heavy Offense".

Investment/spread

Refers to how a Pokémon's effort values and individual values are invested/spread across its stats.

IV battle

Refers to a battle held solely for the purpose of observing the stats of one or more Pokémon as they appear when set to a higher level for the duration of the battle, thus making it easier to estimate the Pokémon's individual values.

Mono team

Refers to a team with homogeneity in a certain area such as type, color, or generation.

Nerf

When properties of a Pokémon, move, or Ability are changed between games to become weaker. For instance, Thunderbolt, Flamethrower, Surf, and Ice Beam were all nerfed from 95 to 90 base power in the transition from Gen V to Gen VI.

Pinch Berry

Refers to the Liechi, Ganlon, Salac, Petaya, Apicot, Lansat, and Starf Berries, which all raise a stat when the holding Pokémon's HP drops below ¼ (referred to as being in a pinch in the games). The Micle and Custap Berries may also be considered Pinch Berries.

Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Main article: Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Refers to the Pokémon Dragonite, Tyranitar, Salamence, Metagross, Garchomp, Hydreigon, Goodra and Kommo-o.

Residual damage

Damage taken by a Pokémon without having been attacked, whether by recoil (via Life Orb or moves that have recoil), contact (via Rocky Helmet, Iron Barbs, Rough Skin, or Spiky Shield), weather (hail or sandstorm), status conditions (poison or burn), and/or entry hazards. Also referred to as "passive/indirect damage".

Redirection

Refers to a tactic in Double Battle that uses moves or Abilities to force opponents to target a specific Pokémon, usually via Follow Me or Rage Powder, but also includes the moves Spotlight and Z-Destiny Bond or the Abilities Lightning Rod or Storm Drain.

Scouting

Refers to a battle strategy that uses the protection moves to ease prediction and retain momentum for a team. Also used for various battle strategies via Protect/Detect, such as a Pokémon with the held item Toxic Orb/Flame Orb to activate its Guts Ability and a Pokémon with the Ability Speed Boost or Moody.

Setter

Refers to battling strategy involves the field effects that affect specific Pokémon in the battle, such as weather, terrain, Trick Room, or Gravity. "Auto Setter" refers to a Pokémon with the Ability that changes the weather or terrain, as soon as a Pokémon with the said Ability enters the battle, without wasting a turn.

Spam

Refers to repeated use of the same move or Pokémon. This aspect of Pokémon battling is highlighted in the games in the form of the move Echoed Voice and Round.

Speed control

Refers to a tactic in Double Battle that uses moves or Abilities to increase the player's Pokémon's Speed or decrease their opponent's Speed in order to move first. This strategy is usually achieved via Tailwind, Icy Wind, or Electroweb. Trick Room is also occasionally referred to as Speed control, making Trick Room and/or Tailwind strategy also referred to as "TR Team" or "TailRoom".

Speed Tier

Refers to an analysis of each eligible Pokémon's potential Speed stat in a competition.

Spread move

In Double Battles and Triple Battles, damaging moves that target all other Pokémon or all opponent's Pokémon.

STAB

An abbreviation for same-type attack bonus.

Sub-legendary Pokémon

Refers to the Legendary Pokémon that generally permitted in the official competitive play. These Pokémon include Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres, Raikou, Entei, Suicune, Regirock, Regice, Registeel, Latias, Latios, Uxie, Mesprit, Azelf, Heatran, Regigigas, Cresselia, Cobalion, Terrakion, Virizion, Tornadus, Thundurus, Landorus, Tapu Koko, Tapu Lele, Tapu Bulu, and Tapu Fini.

Team Preview

A pre-battle phase in which all players get to see each of the 6 Pokémon each player can choose their Pokémon from. Officially introduced in Generation V.

Tier

Main article: Tier

An attempt by players to classify Pokémon in a given generation by their utility in competitive battles. Tiers in Pokémon are generally determined by usage.

Time Limit

Any mid-game effects in the official competitive battle such as selecting a move or retreating Pokemon, which usually takes place within the 45 seconds allocated per turn. Not implemented by battle simulators like Pokémon Showdown and Pokémon Online.

Theorymon

Discussing the metagame hypothetically. Includes discussions such as Pokémon having access to certain moves or Abilities they do not officially have.

Type coverage

Refers to how the types of damage-dealing moves known by a Pokémon match up against all 18 types and their many combinations in terms of effectiveness.

Unofficial format/rules

Standard rules

Refer to a set of widely employed rules for unofficial multiplayer battles, such as 6 VS 6 Single Battle (as opposed to 3 VS 3 Single Battle in the official format). A 6 VS 6 Single Battle, with the species, sleep, evasion, and endless battle clauses, as well as bans on hacks, one-hit knockout moves, Moody, and Pokémon in the (abided) Uber tier.

Other Metagame (OM)

Refers to a format in which changed mechanics or teambuilding restrictions are put in place. Some popular OMs include Monotype, where each Pokémon must share a type, Balanced Hackmons, where Pokémon can have illegal movesets and Abilities, and Mix and Mega, which allows any Pokémon to Mega Evolve based on the stat changes provided by official Mega Stones.

VGC/WCS

An abbreviation for Video Game Championships/World Championships, an official national/international video game competition held by The Pokémon Company. The competitors were required to use the specific game from core series. The battles were conducted through Double Battle format.

The term "VGC <year>" commonly refers to the rule of official competition in the said year, which includes the prohibition of duplicate items, Special and Mythical Pokémon, as well as using Pokémon included in either regional or National Pokédex. Additional rule known by community as GS Rule or "Generation Showdown" also allowed to use maximum of 2 Special Pokémon in a team. Starting in VGC 2014, all Pokémon with the specific origin marking are required to participate in the competitions.

Pokémon sets

Refer to Pokémon not only by species, but also by their stats, moves, Ability, and held item.

Common roles

Within competitive battling, there are a number of categories that are used to describe the intended role of a Pokémon set.

-ate Abilities

Refers to a Pokémon with the Ability Refrigerate, Pixilate, Aerilate, or Galvanize.

AcroGem

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Acrobatics and holding Flying Gem, a popular strategy used in Generation V. The consumed Flying Gem powers up Acrobatics by 50% and then doubles Acrobatics's base power. This set became non-existent since Generation VI because all Gems except Normal Gem are unobtainable in those games.

Annoyer/Disruptor

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent the opponent from progressing with their strategy, commonly through the use of status moves and status conditions.

Anti-Intimidate

Refers to a Pokémon whose Ability is either Hyper Cutter, Clear Body, Defiant, or Competitive with the intended effect of preventing or exploiting the Attack drop from a Pokémon with Intimidate Ability. Pokémon with Defiant Ability raises Attack to +1 and Pokémon with Competitive Ability raises Sp. Atk to +2 when Intimidate is affecting those Pokémon. Adrenaline Orb is sometimes used on the Pokémon with the aforementioned Ability to further raise its Speed by 1 stage.

AV/WP

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the held item Assault Vest or Weakness Policy.

Baton Passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use the move Baton Pass in order to pass on positive stat changes and/or volatile battle statuses, which it may or may not have contributed to itself.

Blanket Check

Refers to a Pokémon that is added to the team to check a lot of threats and metagame trends at once.

BoltBeam

Refers to the moves Thunderbolt and Ice Beam being present in a Pokémon set, and the resulting offensive type synergy. "Pseudo BoltBeam" refers to a damage-dealing Electric-type move and a damage-dealing Ice-type move being present in a Pokémon set, when these are not the exact combination of Thunderbolt and Ice Beam (usually an Electric-type Pokémon with an Ice-type Hidden Power).

BU/CM

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Bulk Up or Calm Mind.

Bulky

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves, special moves or both.

Check

Refers to a Pokémon set that has an advantage over another Pokémon set such that it can easily defeat that other Pokémon or force it to switch out. A check differs from a counter in that a check cannot switch in then threaten the Pokémon.

ChestoResto

Refers to the move Rest and the held item Chesto Berry being present in a Pokémon set. Also referred to as RestoChesto.

Choice user

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Band, Choice Scarf, or Choice Specs. Branched into numerous terms such as "Choiced", "Banded" "Scarfed", "Specced", "Choice", "Band", "Scarf", "Specs", "CB" <Pokémon>.

Choice Trick

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Band, Choice Scarf, or Choice Specs and the move Trick or Switcheroo, intended to Choice lock the opponent's Pokémon by swapping the items. Branched into numerous terms such as "TrickBander", "TrickSpecs", "Scarf Trick".

Cleaner

Refers to a Pokémon that is used late-game to sweep the opponent's team after it has been weakened.

Cleric

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to restore the HP and/or cure the status conditions of its allies, through the use of status moves like Wish, Heal Bell, and Aromatherapy.

Counter

Refers to a Pokémon set that has an advantage over another Pokémon set such that it can switch into an attack from that other Pokémon and easily defeat it or force it to switch out. A counter differs from a check in that a counter can switch into an attack and still threaten the Pokémon.

DD/SD

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Dragon Dance or Swords Dance.

Decoy

Refers to a Pokémon that is knocked out as part of the course of action chosen by its Trainer in the given battle situation. Also referred to as "Death Fodder".

Disquake

Refers to the Double Battle combination of one or more (Flying/Levitating Electric-type) Pokémon sets that include Discharge with one or more (Ground-type) Pokémon sets that include Earthquake, and the resulting defensive and offensive type synergy.

Double Dancer

Refers to a Setup sweeper with two stat-boosting moves, one boosting Speed to deal with offensive teams, and the other boosting an offensive stat to deal with bulkier teams.

Dual Screens

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Light Screen and Reflect.

EdgeQuake

Refers to the moves Stone Edge and Earthquake being present in a Pokémon set, and the resulting offensive type synergy. "Pseudo EdgeQuake" refers to a damage-dealing Rock-type move and a damage-dealing Ground-type move being present in a Pokémon set, when these are not the exact combination of Stone Edge and Earthquake (such as Earth Power and Power Gem).

Endureversal

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Endure and Reversal or Flail. May be assisted through the use of a Focus Sash, Salac Berry, or Liechi Berry. There are many similar strategies, including F.E.A.R.

F.E.A.R.

Main article: Appendix:F.E.A.R.

Refers to a Pokémon set with a comparatively low HP stat, holding a Focus Sash, with the move Endeavor and a damage-dealing move with increased priority. Some variations use the Ability Sturdy instead of Focus Sash.

F.E.A.R. counter

A Pokémon meant to prevent F.E.A.R. from working properly. Common F.E.A.R. counters are Ghost-type Pokémon and Pokémon with Sand Stream or Snow Warning.

Glass cannon

Refers to a Pokémon set with comparatively high Attack and/or Special Attack that, due to its combination of HP and Defense/Special Defense, takes a comparatively high percentage of damage from damage-dealing moves.

Hazard blocker

Refers to a Pokémon that protects the user's battlefield from entry hazards, usually as a result of Magic Bounce or Magic Coat.

Hazard remover

Refers to a Pokémon set that specifically used to remove entry hazards on the user's battlefield, usually by using Rapid Spin (often referred to as a "Spinner") or Defog (often referred to as a "Defogger"). Defog's ability to remove entry hazards from the user's side was introduced in Generation VI.

Lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, or one of the Pokémon sets that is commonly sent out first.

Anti-lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first.

Attack lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first through the use of damage-dealing moves supported by a high Attack or Special Attack stat.

Scout lead

A lead that uses U-turn or Volt Switch to send in a Pokémon without missing a chance to inflict damage. Scout leads often work well with Choice items.

Suicide lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, including a comparatively high Speed stat, one or more moves that cause entry hazards, and the held item Focus Sash or the Ability Sturdy. A Pokémon with Sturdy Ability and holding a Custap Berry is sometimes referred to as "Custap Lead".

LO

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the held item Life Orb.

Mighty glacier

Refers to a Pokémon with comparatively high stats in everything except Speed.

Mixed

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes both physical and special moves.

Paraflincher

Refers to a Pokémon set that is capable of inducing paralysis and causing flinching. Often combined with Serene Grace to increase the likelihood of flinching.

Parafusion

Refers to a Pokémon set that is capable of inducing paralysis and causing confusion.

PerishTrap

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Perish Song and a trapping move or trapping Ability such as Mean Look or Shadow Tag. This is intended to trap the opponent and use Perish Song, keeping them trapped until they faint from Perish Song.

Phazer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to eliminate an opponent's Pokémon's positive stat changes and/or other beneficial effects without using Haze. One approach is to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail. Another approach is to pressure the opponent to call back their Pokémon, by using status moves with disadvantageous effects that can be removed through switching (such as Leech Seed, Perish Song, or Yawn).

Originally referred to as a pseudo-hazer, it has since been shortened to PHazer, and now commonly formatted simply phazer. Is similar to shuffler.

Pivot

Refers to a Pokémon that is generally only used for switching due to its solid defensive stats and typing.

Powerhouse

Refers to a Pokémon species that due to its stats, type(s), Ability, and movepool, merits usage without much regard to the team it is put on, being capable of doing good on most teams as a stand-alone Pokémon.

Pseudo-passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to aid its allies directly through the use of status moves with beneficial effects (such as Wish, Light Screen, or Reflect), but without using Baton Pass. Often referred to as a "Wish Passer".

Pursuit Trap

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Pursuit, intended to revenge kill the opposing Pokémon that intended to switch out.

Quiver Pass

Refers to the stat changes caused by Quiver Dance being passed on to an ally via Baton Pass.

Rest Talker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Rest and Sleep Talk. Also referred to as a "Sleep Talker" or a "STalker".

Revenge killer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon without preparation by timing the free switch-in that is granted when an ally is knocked out. It is typically tailored torwards getting to move first, by including one or more damage-dealing moves with increased priority and/or a comparatively high Speed stat (achieved with or without the held item Choice Scarf). This aspect of Pokémon battling is highlighted in the games in the form of the move Retaliate.

Sacrifice

Refers to a Pokémon that is switched in to be knocked out for the benefit of the party. Can be used in a wide range of applications, which include from using a disadvantaged Pokémon to indirectly damage an opponent through recoil or Life Orb damage (which will be higher if the Pokemon sacrificed has more HP than the main attacker), stall for a turn against a badly poisoned opponent, switch into battle to allow a Choiced ally to switch moves, or use their Ability such as Intimidate to lower the opponent's Attack which would otherwise sweep the party.

Sashed

Refers to the held item Focus Sash being present in a Pokémon set.

Sash/Sub Breaker

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to break the opponent's protection behind Focus Sash, substitute, Sturdy, or Disguise, usually by using multi-strike moves, Fake Out, or Pokémon with an Ability such as Mold Breaker or Parental Bond.

Seeder

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Leech Seed.

Shuffler

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail. "Status shuffler" refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to inflict status conditions on multiple opposing Pokémon, and cause multiple switches from the opponent in order to achieve this end. Is similar to phazer.

Smash Pass

Refers to the stat changes caused by Shell Smash being passed on to an ally via Baton Pass.

Spinblocker

Refers to a Ghost-type Pokémon that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from successfully using Rapid Spin.

Stallbreaker

A Pokémon that immediately threatens stall not for breaking down walls, rather for preventing the Pokémon found on those teams from executing their standard strategies, thus hindering or entirely shutting down the defensive team. Typically includes the move Taunt and a type combination that results in one or more immunities to the status conditions frequently employed by stall teams.

Staller

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force a standstill in order to enjoy its advantages, which may include recurring effect damage to opposing Pokémon (such as from certain status conditions or types of weather). This may be achieved through the use of moves/held items/Abilities that restore HP and/or moves like Protect, usually combined with stats and type(s) that minimize the percentage of damage taken from damage-dealing moves.

Status absorber

Refers to Pokémon that can prevent, remove, or use to its advantage one or more status conditions, usually by using the certain type, move combination, or specific Abilities.

SturdyJuice

Refers to a low-level Pokémon set that includes the Ability Sturdy and the held item Berry Juice, with the Pokémon usually having maximum HP of 21 or less. A common and popular strategy in Little Cup competitions.

Sub user

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Substitute.

Sub CM

Refers to the moves Substitute and Calm Mind being present in a Pokémon set.

SubCoil

Refers to the moves Substitute and Coil being present in a Pokémon set.

SubDisable

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Disable.

Subpasser

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to create a substitute by using Substitute and pass it on to an ally by using Baton Pass.

Subpuncher

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Focus Punch.

SubRoost

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Roost.

Subseeder

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Leech Seed.

SubSplit

Refers to a Pokémon, typically with a low HP stat, whose set that includes the moves Substitute and Pain Split. After creating a substitute, the Pokémon regains their HP by using Pain Split on the opponent.

Subsweeper

Refers to a Pokémon set that typically includes the move Substitute and three attacking moves.

SubToxic

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Toxic.

Suicide Spiker/Rocker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes one or more moves that cause entry hazards and the move Explosion.

Sunnybeamer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use Solar Beam under harsh sunlight.

Supporter

Refers to a Pokémon set who uses non-offensive moves which benefit the team.

SwagPlay

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Swagger and Foul Play. It capitalized on using the move Swagger to sharply boost the opponent's Attack, then taking advantage of the increased damage from Foul Play. The luck-based nature of the set (as it depended on the opponent to not hit the SwagPlay user after the Swagger boost) made it very controversial among competitive players.

In Generation VII, the chance for a confused Pokémon to hit itself was reduced from 50% to 30%. Players speculate that this was changed to make this strategy less unfair.

Sweeper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon in succession, usually through the assistance of positive stat changes. Commonly branched into the categories physical sweeper, special sweeper, and mixed sweeper, depending on its stats and damage-dealing moves.

Setup sweeper

Refers to a sweeper that is assisted by stat-boosting moves such as Swords Dance, Rock Polish, and Nasty Plot.

T-Wave/WoW

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Thunder Wave or Will-O-Wisp.

Tank

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both, while at the same time posing a threat in the form of damage-dealing moves backed by a comparatively high Attack or Special Attack stat. Is similar to a wall.

Thunderdancer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Thunder and Rain Dance.

Trapper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from switching out, through the effects of various status moves, damage-dealing moves, or Abilities, and take advantage of the situation, usually by knocking out them due to their inability to counter.

TrickBracer

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Macho Brace, Lagging Tail, or Iron Ball and the move Trick or Switcheroo, intended to cut the opposing Pokémon's Speed in half by swapping the items.

Utility

Refers to a Pokémon who is capable of performing a large variety of tasks based on the team requires. Such Pokémon usually have decent base stats, a useful Ability, and wide movepools.

Volt-Turn

Refers to the combination of one or more Pokémon sets that include Volt Switch with one or more Pokémon sets that include U-turn.

Wall

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both. Commonly branched into the categories physical wall, special wall, and mixed wall, depending on its stats. Is similar to a tank and a staller.

Wallbreaker

An offensively oriented Pokémon meant specifically for crushing walls rather than sweeping, usually done with powerful offensive stats and use both physical and special moves in their moveset.

Wonderbuster

Prior to Generation VI, refers to a Pokémon that can counter Wondereye and Wondertomb. Usually includes a type-changing move and a move that is super effective against it (e.g. a Lanturn with Soak and Thunderbolt).

Z-Fly/Bounce

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Fly/Bounce and held item Flyinium Z, allowing to perform Z-Move Supersonic Skystrike in a turn. This set is typically used by offensive Flying-type Pokémon that lack reliable and powerful Flying-type attacks.

Z-Solar Beam

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Solar Beam and held item Grassium Z, allowing to perform Z-Move Bloom Doom in a turn. This set is typically used by offensive Fire-type Pokémon to knock out the opposing Water-type Pokémon, and countering Ground and Rock-type Pokémon.

Species-specific sets

Agiligross

Refers to a Metagross set that includes the move Agility, Meteor Mash, and two other attacking moves.

BandTar

Refers to a Tyranitar set that includes the held item Choice Band and the move Pursuit, which serves as a powerful Pursuit Trapper.

Bellyzard

Refers to a Charizard set that includes the move Belly Drum, the Ability Blaze, and an HP stat that is divisible by 4. It is commonly assisted by a Salac Berry and/or the move Substitute. It has fallen out of favor since Generation IV due to Stealth Rock.

BellyJet

Refers to a Azumarill set that includes the move Belly Drum and Aqua Jet. Due to a change in Egg Move mechanics, it first became possible in Generation VI (although both moves were individually available for Azumarill in previous generations).

Bravest Bird

Refers to a defensive Talonflame set that includes the move Brave Bird, Roost, Tailwind, and the Ability Gale Wings, intended for use in Generation VI as sweeper or supporter. This set allows Talonflame to move first due to its priority Flying-type moves backed by its naturally high Speed, which caused the downfall of many Pokémon that weak to Fire/Flying-type coverage. It has fallen out of favor since Generation VII, as Gale Wings Ability can be only activated when the user's HP is full.

Brightchomp/Haxchomp

Refers to a bulky Garchomp set that includes the hax item Bright Powder and the Ability Sand Veil, which further raises its evasion in the sandstorm.

Calmcune/Crocune

Refers to a Suicune set that includes the move Calm Mind, commonly assisted by Rest, Sleep Talk, and a special move.

Chainchomp

Refers to a Garchomp set that includes special moves such as Draco Meteor and Fire Blast, backed by a high Speed stat.

Conversion-Z

Refers to a Porygon-Z set that includes the move Conversion and held item Normalium Z, which enables Porygon-Z to boost all stats via Z-Conversion and change its type to match the type of the first move slot, which allows Porygon-Z to gain STAB to one of its special moves such as Thunderbolt, Ice Beam, Dark Pulse, or Shadow Ball.

CopyRoar

Refers to a Riolu set that includes the moves Copycat and Roar and the Ability Prankster. This strategy is accompanied with a Pokémon with entry hazard moves.

This setup requires Riolu to use the move Copycat with +1 priority after using Roar in the previous turn, which calls a move Roar that force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back. Repeating this process, it wear down the opposing team due to the entry hazards.

Starting in Generation VI, Copycat can no longer call the move Roar. Players speculate that this was changed to specifically prevent this strategy.

Critdra

Refers to a Kingdra set that includes the Ability Sniper, the move Focus Energy, and the held item Scope Lens. Due to the change of increased critical hit rate in Generation VI, the combination of Scope Lens and Focus Energy results a guaranteed critical hit, which also further boost the power due to the Ability Sniper.

Crown Beasts

Refers to Shiny Raikou, Entei, and Suicune from Generation IV events that knows the event-exclusive move Extreme Speed and the other 3 respective special moves (Zap Cannon, Aura Sphere, Weather Ball for Raikou, Flare Blitz, Howl, Crush Claw for Entei, and Sheer Cold, Air Slash, Aqua Ring for Suicune), as well as having a fixed nature (Rash for Raikou, Adamant for Entei, and Relaxed for Suicune).

They were prohibited in VGC since Generation VI due to the lack of origin marking. Shiny Suicune with Sheer Cold was the most popular one and quite used in the online tournaments. However, Suicune can learn Sheer Cold by leveling up starting in Generation VII.

Curselax

Refers to a Snorlax set that includes the moves Curse and Rest, which was commonly used in Generation II metagame and Kanto Classic online competition.

Dream World Chandelure

Refers to the illegitimate Chandelure with the Hidden Ability Shadow Tag in Generation V core series. This set became impossible as its Hidden Ability was changed to Infiltrator since Generation VI.

Drizzletoed

Refers to a Politoed set that includes the Ability Drizzle.

Droughttales

Refers to a Ninetales set that includes the Ability Drought.

ErupTran

Refers to a Heatran set that includes the special move Eruption. This Heatran always has a Quiet nature (+Sp. Atk/-Speed) and can be only obtained by transferring special Heatran from Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs. Commonly paired with Trick Room Cresselia in Generation IV and V VGC, but was prohibited in VGC since Generation VI due to the lack of origin marking.

Evio-

Refers to a non-fully evolved Pokémon set that are compatible to the held item Eviolite, which raises the holder's Defense and Special Defense by 50%. Commonly used by Clefairy, Magneton, Rhydon, Chansey, Murkrow, Misdreavus, Porygon2, Dusclops, and Doublade.

Evopass

Refers to an Eevee with the moves Last Resort and Baton Pass, and holding Eevium Z. This set serves as Baton Passer by passing all boosted stats due to the Z-Move Extreme Evoboost.

Extreme Killer

Refers to an Arceus with the moves Extreme Speed, Swords Dance, and two other attacking moves (typically Earthquake and Shadow Claw), as well as holding either Life Orb or Silk Scarf. This bulky offensive Arceus set serves as a very powerful revenge killer, due to its nearly unstoppable STAB Extreme Speed.

Flinchrachi/Haxrachi

Refers to a Jirachi that abuses Serene Grace Ability by using moves with additional effects such as Iron Head, Heart Stamp, and Body Slam, along with status-inducing moves such as Thunder Wave.

Funbro

Refers to a Slowbro with the moves Block, Heal Pulse, Recycle, and Slack Off, holding a Leppa Berry. It switches in on a Pokémon that cannot 2HKO it, traps it with Block and heals itself with Slack Off, using Recycle to regenerate the Leppa Berry as necessary. When the opponent runs out of PP, it uses Heal Pulse to recover Struggle damage. This combination allows it to extend a non-timed battle indefinitely, leaving the opponent no recourse except to disconnect. Since all link battles have Time Limit in Generation VI, this is only relevant in simulator battles and Generation V.

GeoXern

Refers to a Xerneas holding Power Herb and knows the moves Geomancy, Moonblast, and two other attacking moves (typically Thunder/Focus Blast for Single Battle, or Dazzling Gleam for Double Battle). This offensive Xerneas set serves as a very powerful sweeper, as Power Herb allows Xerneas to set up Geomancy in a single turn. Its STAB Moonblast/Dazzling Gleam is further boosted thanks to its Ability Fairy Aura along with its +2 Sp. Atk boosted by Geomancy.

GothStall

Refers to a Shadow Tag Gothitelle holding Choice Scarf and knows Trick, intended for trapping and Choice locking the weakened opponent.

Great Wall

Refers to a Lugia or Giratina Altered Forme with the move Whirlwind/Roar/Dragon Tail and holding Leftovers. This bulky phazer set also abuses the Ability Pressure, which is used to reduce the opponent's PP significantly.

Haxjask

Refers to a Ninjask that has been hacked to have the Ability No Guard and the move Sheer Cold, intended to be used in the battle facilities due to being the fastest non-Mythical Pokémon in the game.

Haxrein

Refers to a Walrein appearing in numerous battle facilities that includes one-hit knockout moves Sheer Cold and Fissure. In the Battle Frontier of Pokémon Emerald, it is also holding a Quick Claw.

Inverse Avalugg

Refers to an Avalugg set with Sturdy Ability that knows Recover and holding Leftovers, intended to be used in a Inverse Battle, as Ice-type in Inverse Battle is great defensively with only a weakness to Ice itself. Commonly used along with Chansey, which forms a formidable defensive core.

Kyu-B

Refers to a Black Kyurem that includes both physical and special moves such as Fusion Bolt, Earth Power, and Ice Beam, backed by comparatively high Attack and Special Attack, which serves as a mixed wallbreaker. Due to its very limited physical movepool, Black Kyurem was placed in Smogon's OU tier despite being a Legendary Pokémon with above 670 base stats total.

Leadape

Refers to an Infernape set that is sent out first, commonly including both physical and special moves, Fake Out, Stealth Rock, and the held item Focus Sash.

McIcegar

Refers to a Gengar set that includes the moves Ice Punch, Focus Punch, and Substitute, intended for use in Generation III. This set is no longer used since Generation IV, as physical and special moves are determined by the move itself rather than the type.

Minimize Pass

Refers to a Drifblim set that includes the moves Minimize and Baton Pass. This has been used to evade and stall the opponent.

Mixape

Refers to an Infernape set that includes both physical and special moves such as Overheat and Close Combat, backed by comparatively high Attack, Special Attack, and Speed stats.

Mixgross

Refers to a Metagross set that includes both physical and special moves such as Meteor Mash, Fire-type Hidden Power, and Grass Knot.

Mixmence

Refers to a Salamence set that includes both physical and special moves such as Draco Meteor, Fire Blast, and Earthquake, backed by comparatively high Attack, Special Attack, and Speed stats.

MixPert

Refers to a Swampert set that includes both physical and special moves such as Earthquake and Ice Beam.

MixTar

Refers to a Tyranitar set that includes both physical and special moves such as Stone Edge, Thunderbolt, and Ice Beam.

Punching Alakazam

Refers to an Alakazam set that includes the moves Fire Punch, Thunder Punch, and/or Ice Punch, intended for use in Generation III. This set is no longer used since Generation IV, as physical and special moves are determined by the move itself rather than the type.

RBY Mewtwo

Refers to a Mewtwo set that includes the moves Amnesia (which boosts both Special stats instead of Special Defense), STAB Psychic, and two other moves (typically Blizzard/Ice Beam and Recover/Rest), intended for use in Generation I due to its very high base stats total and previously unrivaled bulky sweeper.

RBY Tauros

Refers to a Tauros set that includes the moves Hyper Beam, Body Slam, Earthquake, and Blizzard, intended for use in Generation I due to its previously perfect coverage and having a high chance of critical hit, thanks to its high Speed stat influencing the critical hit rate.

Scarfchomp

Refers to a Garchomp set that includes the held item Choice Scarf. It is featured in several battle facilities found in the games.

Scarfgon

Refers to a Flygon set that includes the held item Choice Scarf and the moves U-turn, Outrage, and Earthquake, which was commonly used in Generation IV metagame.

Scarfloom/Sashloom

Refers to a Breloom set that includes the held item Choice Scarf/Focus Sash and the moves Spore and three other attacking moves such as Bullet Seed, Mach Punch, and Rock Tomb.

Scarfogre

Refers to a Kyogre set that includes the held item Choice Scarf and the move Water Spout, which is boosted by rain activated by its Ability Drizzle. It has fallen out of favor since Generation VI due to the introduction of Primal Groudon and its Desolate Land Ability in Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire.

Scarfraptor/Bandraptor

Refers to a Staraptor set that includes the held item Choice Scarf/Choice Band and the moves U-turn and Final Gambit, which serves as scout lead and revenge killer, respectively.

Sejun Pachirisu

Refers to a defensive Pachirisu set with the moves Nuzzle, Follow Me, Super Fang, and Protect, and holding Sitrus Berry, intended to be used in Double Battle. This set is popularized by Se Jun Park, the winner of 2014 World Championships in VGC Master Division.

Smogon-

A prefix used to refer to extremely common Pokémon in the metagame, usually OU, that are considered to be broken or requiring little skill, and are apparently copied and pasted from Smogon pages. Examples include Smogonbird, referring to a Talonflame with Gale Wings; Smogonfrog, which refers to a Greninja with Protean; and Smogonsword, referring to King's Shield Aegislash in either Shield and Blade Forme.

Specsmence

Refers to a Salamence set that includes the held item Choice Specs and special moves such as Draco Meteor and Flamethrower.

Stallrein

Refers to a Walrein set that includes Protect, Substitute, Leftovers, and Ice Body, intended for stalling during a hailstorm.

Stallzard

Refers to a bulky Mega Charizard X set that includes the moves Will-O-Wisp and Roost, and two other attacking moves (typically Flare Blitz/Fire Punch/Earthquake and Dragon Claw/Thunder Punch).

Steel Trapper

Refers to Magnezone or Magneton with the Ability Magnet Pull, which is used to trap the opposing Steel-type Pokémon.

Sturdinja

Refers to a Shedinja with the Ability Sturdy. Usually set up in Double or Triple Battles by using Pokémon with Skill Swap such as Carbink with the Ability Sturdy.

Swagkey

Refers to a Prankster Klefki set that knows Swagger, Thunder Wave, and Foul Play.

Swiftdra

Refers to a Kingdra set that includes the Ability Swift Swim, the moves Muddy Water/Hydro Pump and Draco Meteor, and the held item Choice Specs/Dragon Gem, intended to be used in the rain weather. It has fallen out of favor since Generation VI, as the rain summoned by Drizzle Ability lasts only for five turns instead of the whole battle.

Techniloom/Technitop

Refers to a Breloom or Hitmontop set that includes the Ability Technician and one or more moves with base powers of 60 or less.

TormenTran

Refers to a defensive Heatran set that includes the moves Torment, Substitute/Protect, and Lava Plume and holding a Leftovers, intended for stalling.

Toxic Heal

Refers to Breloom/Gliscor with the Ability Poison Heal and holding a Toxic Orb. When Toxic Orb activates (usually supported via Protect) and badly poisons the Pokémon, the Ability Poison Heal gradually heals the Pokémon each turn instead of damages them (which is more effective than Leftovers).

TruAnt

Refers to Durant set includes the Ability Truant and the move Entrainment. As the opponent in several battle facilities switches only under very specific circumstances, this strategy allows the player to switch another Pokémon, use Protect when being attacked, and attack/set up when the opponent's Pokémon is loafing due to the Ability Truant transferred via Entrainment.

TyraniBoah

Refers to a Tyranitar set that includes both physical and special moves, including the moves Substitute and Focus Punch.

Unaware Wall

Refers to a Pokémon with the Ability Unaware (such as Clefable, Quagsire, and Pyukumuku) and typically holding a Leftovers, as well as knowing a self-recovery move such as Recover and Soft-Boiled, intended to wall the setup sweepers.

VinCune

Refers to a Suicune with Scald, Calm Mind, Substitute, and Protect.

Webber

Refers to the leading Pokémon set that knows Sticky Web, an entry hazard move that intended to slow down the opponent's team. Examples include Sturdy Shuckle with Mental Herb and Focus Sash Smeargle.

Wondertomb/Wondereye

Refers to a Spiritomb or Sableye that has been hacked to have the Ability Wonder Guard, making it immune to essentially all direct damage. This term is essentially obsolete as of Generation VI as the Dark/Ghost type combination no longer has zero weaknesses with the introduction of the Fairy type.

Team archetypes

AFK

Refers to the core of Arcanine with Intimidate Ability, Tapu Fini, and Kartana being present in a team in VGC 2017.

Big 6

Refers to a set of Xerneas, Primal Groudon, Mega Salamence, Mega Kangaskhan, Smeargle, and Talonflame in VGC 2016.

Minor variants that swap out a single member (usually Talonflame) are referred to as Big X, where X depends on the Pokémon not part of the Big 6 that is on the team (usually the first letter of its name). One common variant is Big B, where Bronzong replaces Talonflame.

Bird Spam/Fly Spam

Refers to an offensive core consisting of Talonflame and Staraptor or Mega Pinsir. It would make use of priority to gain immediate momentum and have them wear down each others' checks. Popular during Generation VI Single Battles.

Celetran

Refers to a Celebi set and a Heatran set being present in a team in a Single Battle, and the resulting defensive synergy and offensive pressure due to the versatility of Celebi and Heatran.

CHALK

Refers to a set of Cresselia, Heatran, Amoonguss, Landorus Therian Forme, and Mega Kangaskhan in VGC 2015. This team was used by the Japanese players in Top 8 Master Division of 2015 World Championships.

CressTran

Refers to a Cresselia set and a Heatran set being present in a team in a Double Battle. Common in Generation V and VI VGC (2012-2013, 2015).

DeoSharp

Refers to a Deoxys Defense Forme with Spikes/Stealth Rock holding a Red Card and a Defiant Bisharp being present in a team in a Single Battle. This team is used to punish the opposing hazard remover, especially a Defogger, by using the opponent's Defog on Bisharp, which activates Bisharp's Defiant Ability and raises its Attack by 2 stages.

Divecats

A team in Generation V which features Prankster Liepard and/or Purrloin that know Assist and are holding a Lagging Tail or Full Incense, with the only moves known by other Pokémon being moves with a semi-invulnerable turn or moves that cannot be called by Assist. (If both Liepard and Purrloin are being used, they also cannot know any moves other than moves with a semi-invulnerable turn or moves that cannot be called by Assist.) Typically, Dive and Shadow Force are used (Shadow Force for being unable to be hit by any move, Dive to hit Normal types).

This setup means that Purrloin/Liepard will use the move Assist with +1 priority, which calls a move with a semi-invulnerable turn. The next turn, they move at 0 priority (since they are now using a physical move, so Prankster doesn't apply), and move last due to the held Lagging Tail/Full Incense. Repeating this process, they wear down the opposing team and are very difficult to hit.

Starting in Generation VI, Assist can no longer call moves with a semi-invulnerable turn. Players speculate that this was changed to specifically prevent this strategy.

Double Defog Stall

Refers to a set of Arena Trap Dugtrio, Zapdos, and Skarmory, as well as some stallers such as Chansey, Clefable, and Alomomola. This team differs from SPL Stall in that it relies on Defog to keep hazards off the field instead of Mega Sableye. Also known as Ciele Stall.

Double Genie

Refers to a pair of Thundurus Incarnate Forme and Landorus Therian Forme being present in a team in a Double Battle. Common in Generation V and VI VGC (2013, 2015-2016).

DragMag

Refers to the core of Dragon-type sweeper (such as Latios, Garchomp, Hydreigon, and Salamence) and Magnet Pull Magnezone with Fire-type Hidden Power being used together as an offensive core in a Single Battle, which allows a Dragon-type Pokémon to spam the powerful Dragon-type attacks such as Outrage and Draco Meteor without being countered by Steel-type Pokémon.

Dual Weather

Refers to a pair of Pokémon with Abilities with effects on weather conditions (Drought and Sand Stream, etc.) being used together as an offensive core. These teams are also designed to defeat a Pokémon with the specific type and counter the other weather-based teams. Examples include Mega Charizard Y and Hippowdon/Tyranitar core (Sun-Sand Offense) in Single Battle and Primal Groudon and Primal Kyogre team (Dual Primal) in VGC 2016.

Ferrocent/Jellithorn

Refers to a pair of Ferrothorn and Jellicent being present in a team, resulting the offensive and defensive synergy especially in the rain. Common in Generation V VGC (2011-2013).

GardeSpore

Refers to a pair of Mega Gardevoir with Trick Room and Amoonguss that knows Spore and Rage Powder being present in a team in a Double Battle. Common in Generation VI VGC (2014-2016).

GyaraVire

Refers to Gyarados and Electivire being used together as an offensive core in Generation IV. Electivire switches into Gyarados's Electric-type weakness to boost its Speed by one due to the Ability Motor Drive. Gyarados switches into Ground-type attacks aimed at the switched out Electivire.

Intimidate Volt-Turn

Refers to Landorus Therian Forme and Mega Manectric being used together as an offensive core in Single and Double Battles, due to their natural type synergy and devastating combination of Intimidate Ability and U-turn/Volt Switch.

Japan Sand

Refers to Tyranitar with Choice Scarf and Excadrill with Focus Sash being used together as an offensive core. Tyranitar's Ability Sand Stream summons sandstorm, which doubles Excadrill's Speed due to its Ability Sand Rush activated during sandstorm. Common in Generation V and VI VGC (2011-2013, 2015).

Khan Artist

Refers to Mega Kangaskhan and Smeargle as the leads in a Double Battle. Typically, Smeargle knows Dark Void and Kangaskhan knows Fake Out, allowing significant first-turn disruption by putting both of the opponent's Pokémon to sleep. Common in Generation VI VGC (2014, 2015, 2016).

From Generation VII onward, Dark Void fails if used by any Pokémon other than Darkrai, so Dark Void Smeargle is no longer used.

KokoChomp

Refers to Tapu Koko and Garchomp being present in a team in VGC 2017. Due to the presence of guardian deities in this format, Garchomp's Dragon Claw is often replaced with another coverage move such as Poison Jab or Fire Fang.

LeleBlim

Refers to Tapu Lele and Unburden Drifblim that knows Tailwind and holding Psychic Seed being present in a team in VGC 2017. Drifblim is able set up Tailwind faster than any other Pokémon due to its Unburden Ability activated when Psychic Seed is consumed in the Psychic Terrain.

Lillikoal

Refers to Torkoal with the Ability Drought and Lilligant with the Ability Chlorophyll as the leads in a team in VGC 2017. Due to being the slowest weather setter, Torkoal's Ability Drought causes intense sunlight with very little interruption, which doubles Lilligant's Speed due to its Ability Chlorophyll activated during the sunny weather. Lilligant can also use After You to make Torkoal's Eruption attack faster after Lilligant.

Mimilax

Refers to Mimikyu with Trick Room and Gluttony Snorlax holding Figy Berry or Iapapa Berry being present in a team in VGC 2017.

Rain Offense

Refers to a Pokémon with the Ability Drizzle (such as Kyogre, Politoed, or Pelipper) and a Pokémon with the Ability Swift Swim (such as Ludicolo, Kingdra, Kabutops, Omastar, Poliwrath, Golduck, or Mega Swampert) being used together as an offensive core. These teams are also quite used in Double Battle, which includes Politoed/Ludicolo ("Policolo") in VGC 2012-2014 and Pelipper/Golduck ("Double Duck") in VGC 2017.

RayOgre

Refers to a pair of Mega Rayquaza and Primal Kyogre in VGC 2016, which was used to counter the Big 6 or Xerneas/Primal Groudon team.

Regen Core

Refers to the core of several Pokémon with Regenerator Ability (such as Alomomola, Reuniclus, Slowbro, Slowking, Tangrowth, and Tornadus Therian Forme) being present in a team in a Single Battle, which requires numerous switches to restore the team's HP by using the Ability Regenerator.

SkarmBliss

Refers to a Skarmory set and a Blissey set being present in a team in a Single Battle, and the resulting defensive synergy by switching to the appropriate Pokémon to take physical or special hits, respectively. Both Skarmory and Blissey usually hold Leftovers in the unofficial formats. Starting in Generation V, Chansey is commonly used instead of Blissey due to the introduction of Eviolite.

SPL Stall

Also known as "standard stall", this is the most common defensive team in a Single Battle, and the one most often considered when stall is being discussed. The team contains Mega Sableye, Arena Trap Dugtrio, Eviolite Chansey, Shed Shell Skarmory, Unaware Clefable, and Regenerator Toxapex.

Terracott

Refers to Terrakion and Whimsicott with the move Beat Up as the leads in a Double Battle. Typically, Whimsicott uses Beat Up on Terrakion, activating Terrakion's Justified Ability and raising its Attack by 4 stages. Common in Generation V and VI VGC (2011-2013, 2015).

Toxasteela

Refers to a Toxapex set and a Celesteela set being present in a team in a Single Battle, resulting the defensive synergy by Toxapex and the offensive/defensive pressure by Celesteela.

Veil Offense

Refers to a team with a Snow Warning Alolan Ninetales with Aurora Veil and holding Light Clay, assisted by bulky Sweepers.

Voidcats

Refers to a Liepard/male Meowstic with Prankster Ability with Assist and a Smeargle knowing Dark Void either as an ally or within the active party. All the other Pokemon on the team have moves such as Focus Punch which cannot be called upon via Assist so the Liepard/Meowstic is able to use a +1 priority Dark Void at the opponents causing both to fall asleep. Although rarely seen, it was seen in Generation VI VGC (2014-2016).

From Generation VII onward, Dark Void fails if used by any Pokémon other than Darkrai, so Voidcats is no longer used.

Webs

Refers to a team with a Webber, at least one Spinblocker such as Mimikyu, at least one Defog punisher such as Defiant Bisharp or Contrary Serperior, and other offensive Pokémon that take advantage of the opponent's lowered Speed.

Wonder Trio

Refers to Mega Sableye, Shedinja with Baton Pass, and Arena Trap Dugtrio sets being present in a team in a Single Battle, which is used to punish the opposing entry hazard users by using Mega Sableye's Magic Bounce and trap potential stall and stallbreakers by using the momentum of Shedinja's Baton Pass and Dugtrio's Arena Trap.

These teams are also accompanied with several walls and/or stallers, which includes Sturdy Skarmory with Counter, Eviolite Chansey, Clefable/Quagsire with Unaware Ability, Gothitelle with Shadow Tag Ability, and/or Toxapex with Regenerator Ability.

ZapChomp

Refers to Zapdos and Garchomp being used together in a Double Battle. The popularity of Disquake strategy was stemmed by this team. Common in Generation IV, V, and VI VGC (2009-2010, 2012, 2014).

See also

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