List of regional changes in the Pokémon games

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This is a list of regional differences in the Pokémon games.

Main lists

Pokémon

The Pokémon species names were introduced in Japanese. Most Pokémon had their names changed in English, French, German, Chinese, Korean, and Thai. The English names are used in the Spanish and Italian games. Several other languages also use English Pokémon names in their anime dubs.

Pokémon types

Some Pokémon types changed between languages.

  • Psychic is エスパー Esper in Japanese.
  • Dark is あく Evil in Japanese.

Pokémon categories

Some Pokémon categories changed between languages.

  • Meowth (Japanese category: ばけねこポケモン Bakeneko Pokémon; English category: Scratch Cat Pokémon)
    • The Japanese category refers to bakeneko, a supernatural cat in Japanese folklore, but this was lost in the English translation.
  • Persian (Japanese category: シャムネコポケモン Siamese Cat Pokémon; English category: Classy Cat Pokémon)
    • The Japanese category refers to a real-life cat breed, the siamese cat.
  • Kangaskhan (Japanese category: おやこポケモン Parent and Child Pokémon; English category: Parent Pokémon)
    • The Japanese category refers to both parent and child, but the child is not mentioned in the English translation.

Pokémon forms

Some Pokémon form differences changed between languages.

  • Dynamax and Gigantamax are ダイマックス Daimax and キョダイマックス Kyodaimax in Japanese, respectively.
  • Furfrou's trims use the word "Trim" in English but カット Cut in Japanese. However, these words don't apply to Furfrou's default state, the Natural Form.
    • Natural Form (Japanese: やせいのすがた Wild Form)
    • Debutante Trim (Japanese: レディカット Lady Cut)
    • Dandy Trim (Japanese: ジェントルカット Gentleman Cut)
    • Matron Trim (Japanese: マダムカット Madame Cut)
    • La Reine Trim (Japanese: クイーンカット Queen Cut)
      • This trim uses an English name in the Japanese games, but a French name in the English games.
    • Pharaoh Trim (Japanese: キングダムカット Kingdom Cut)

Characters

Main article: List of characters in other languages

Locations

Main article: List of locations in other languages

Moves

Main article: List of moves in other languages

Moves introduced in Generation I

  • Acid Armor (Japanese: とける Liquefy). The Japanese name indicates that the user itself is melting. This is lost in the English translation, but is referenced in the move descriptions from Generation II onwards.
    • The Japanese name does not include the words "Acid" or "Armor" in any way. "Acid" may have been added in the localization because this is a Poison-type move, even though several non-Poison Pokémon are able to learn it. "Armor" may have been added in the localization because this move raises the user's Defense.
  • Cut (Japanese: いあいぎり Iai Cut). The Japanese name refers to iaido, a Japanese martial art. Specifically, it refers to the technique of drawing a blade from its scabbard, cutting down the opponent, then re-sheathing the blade.
  • Guillotine (Japanese: ハサミギロチン Pincer Guillotine). Several Pokémon that use this move have pincers, such as Kingler and Gliscor.
  • Metronome (Japanese: ゆびをふる Wag Finger). The Japanese name refers to the wagging finger associated with the move, implying the user is randomly deciding a move from a list. The move's English name refers to the regular ticks associated with the move, which sound like the device it is named after.
  • Lovely Kiss (Japanese: あくまのキッス Demon's Kiss). In some games, a small demon appears in the move animation. This is related to Generation II move Sweet Kiss (Japanese: てんしのキッス Angel's Kiss).
  • Mirror Move (Japanese: オウムがえし Parrot Mimicry). The reference to a parrot (a real-life bird) may be related to the fact that several Pokémon that can learn this move are birds, such as Pidgey and Chatot. However, this is lost in the English translation.
  • Pay Day (Japanese: ネコにこばん Coin for a Cat). The Japanese name of the move is an idiom equivalent to "to cast pearls before swine." The coins depicted in the move's animation are koban, gold coins used in the Edo period of feudal Japan, the same type of coin as the one on Meowth's head.
  • Rest (Japanese: ねむる Sleep).
  • Swift (Japanese: スピードスター Speed Star). The move's animation includes stars being thrown at the target.
  • Tail Whip (Japanese: しっぽをふる Tail Wag). The move's description mentions that the user "wags its tail cutely, making opposing Pokémon less wary".
    • The English name "Tail Whip" may incorrectly imply that the user strikes the foe with its tail like a whip, which is not the case in the games. However, in the manga Pokémon Adventures, the Tail Whip user sometimes actually strikes its opponent with the tail, which may be consistent with the English name.
  • Thunderbolt (Japanese: 10まんボルト 100,000 Volts). The number "100,000 volts" is mentioned in the Japanese name, but this is lost in the English translation.
  • Waterfall (Japanese: たきのぼり Waterfall Climb). The English name is simply the word "Waterfall", without mentioning the act of climbing waterfalls. Some move descriptions in the games further clarify that the user is actually charging with enough force to climb waterfalls.
    • When this move debuted in Generation I, the moves didn't have in-game descriptions in the core series yet. As a result, in the English version of the Generation I core series games, there is no indication that this move is related to climbing waterfalls.
    • The description about "charging with enough force to climb waterfalls" debuted in the Japanese Pokémon Stadium (which was not released in English). This is also mentioned in the later games Pokémon Stadium and Pokémon Stadium 2, not only in Japanese but in English as well.
    • In Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal, the Japanese move description also mentions "charging with enough force to climb waterfalls". However, the English version was shortened to simply "An aquatic charge attack." The only reference to climbing waterfalls in the English text is when Clair says only once after being defeated: "RisingBadge will enable your Pokémon to use the move for climbing waterfalls." From Generation III onwards, the English move description is closer to the Japanese version, indicating that the user is charging with enough force to climb waterfalls.
    • In several games, a waterfall appears when this move is used in-battle. This may incorrectly suggest that the user is summoning a waterfall, which would be inconsistent with the move description.

Moves introduced in Generation II

  • False Swipe (Japanese: みねうち Strike with the Back of the Sword). False Swipe's Japanese name is a reference to katanas, which are designed to have a single cutting edge on one side, while the other side is mostly flat. Thus, striking the opponent with the flat side of the katana would not be fatal.
  • Rain Dance (Japanese: あまごい Rain Prayer). This is the amagoi, a Shinto prayer and rituals for rain.
    • The Japanese name of this move is unrelated to dancing, therefore this is not a dance move. As such, Rain Dance is unaffected by Dancer, and Tierno does not request to see a Pokémon with this move in Pokémon X and Y. In several anime and manga depictions, the user is not seen dancing at all.
  • Sweet Kiss (Japanese: てんしのキッス Angel's Kiss). In some games, a small angel appears in the move animation. This is related to Generation I move Lovely Kiss (Japanese: あくまのキッス Demon's Kiss).

Moves introduced in Generation III

  • Aerial Ace (Japanese: つばめがえし Swallow Return). The Japanese name references Sasaki Kojirō's "Turning Swallow Cut" sword technique, so named due to its resemblance to the motion of a swallow's tail in flight. The cut is usually construed as a quick upward slash followed by a second one down the same direction, same as the move's animation. As such, it is learned by many Pokémon that are not Flying-type.
  • Assist (Japanese: ねこのて Cat's Paw). The Japanese name is likely a reference to the saying 猫の手も借りたい neko no te mo karitai, which translates to "I would even like to borrow a cat's hands" ("I would even like a cat to assist me"), which means "I need all the help I can get". This is reflected by the way the move works, and that many feline Pokémon are capable of learning it. In some games, a cat's paw appears in the move animation.

Moves introduced in Generation IV

  • Sucker Punch (Japanese: ふいうち Surprise Attack). The Japanese name is unrelated to punching. This move can be learned by some Pokémon without arms, such as Arbok, Gastly, and Electrode. It is also unaffected by the Ability Iron Fist, which raises the power of punching moves.

Abilities

Items

Main article: List of items in other languages

Items introduced in Generation I

  • Three Poké Balls introduced in Generation I had their names changed in the English localization. Only the Master Ball kept its Japanese name.
    • Poké Ball (Japanese: モンスターボール Monster Ball)
    • Great Ball (Japanese: スーパーボール Super Ball)
    • Ultra Ball (Japanese: ハイパーボール Hyper Ball)
      • The Ultra Ball retains a letter H on its design, referencing its Japanese name.
    • Master Ball (Japanese: マスターボール Master Ball)
  • The Potion and its improved variants introduced in Generation I use the Japanese word ぐすり Medicine, which does not specify the type of medicine. The word "Potion" would indicate a form of liquid substance; it was introduced in the English translation. With the introduction of item sprites in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, these items are depicted in-game as bottles designed to spray liquid substances, which may be compatible with both the Japanese and English names. Some of these items have also been depicted in official art and TCG cards as spray bottles since Generation I as well, including the Potion and Super Potion cards.
    • Potion (Japanese: キズぐすり Wound Medicine)
    • Super Potion (Japanese: いいキズぐすり Good Wound Medicine)
    • Hyper Potion (Japanese: すごいキズぐすり Amazing Wound Medicine)
    • Max Potion (Japanese: まんたんのくすり Tank-Filling Medicine)
    • Full Restore (Japanese: かいふくのくすり Recovery Medicine)
  • The drinks introduced in Generation I had their names changed in the localization:
    • Fresh Water (Japanese: おいしいみず Delicious Water)
      • Its name mentions that it's "fresh" in English, but mentions that it's "delicious" in Japanese.
      • Fresh Water is collected from Mt. Silver, according to the Japanese item description in Pokémon Gold, Silver, Crystal, and Stadium. This is also mentioned in the Korean item description from Pokémon Gold and Silver. The reference to Mt. Silver is not found in the English item description.
    • Soda Pop (Japanese: サイコソーダ Psycho Soda)
      • Its name includes "Psycho" in Japanese, but "Pop" in English instead.
    • Lemonade (Japanese: ミックスオレ Mix au Lait)
      • The Lemonade's Japanese name means "Mix au Lait" instead. The word "lait" means "milk" in French, which indicates that this is some form of mixture involving milk. There is no indication in the Japanese name that the drink might include lemon in any way, even though it's called "Lemonade" in English.
      • From Generation II onwards, Lemonade's Japanese item description says that it's "very sweet". This was omitted from the English item description in Generation II, but it's mentioned from Generation III onwards.
  • The Ether, Elixir, and their improved versions have Japanese names unrelated to their English names. The Japanese names all include the word "PP" (specifically in the form of katakana "ピーピー"), and don't involve the words "Ether" or "Elixir" in any way.
    • Ether (Japanese: ピーピーエイド PP Aid)
    • Max Ether (Japanese: ピーピーリカバー PP Recover)
    • Elixir (Japanese: ピーピーエイダー PP Aider)
    • Max Elixir (Japanese: ピーピーマックス PP Max)
  • The Repel's Japanese name refers refers to insect repellents; it includes the term むし Insect. The Repel and its improved variants include the word スプレ Spray in Japanese, indicating their design; however, this word is absent in the English names. Additionally, むしよけ Repellent is not found in the Japanese names of Super Repel and Max Repel. The Super Repel and Max Repel are ranked as "Silver" and "Gold" in Japanese; these words were replaced by "Super" and "Max" in English.
    • Repel (Japanese: むしよけスプレー Repellent Spray)
    • Super Repel (Japanese: シルバースプレー Silver Spray)
    • Max Repel (Japanese: ゴールドスプレー Gold Spray)
  • Poké Doll (Japanese: ピッピにんぎょう Pippi Doll) The Japanese name indicates that it's a Clefairy doll. However, the English item name does not mention Clefairy.
    • The species of Poké Doll has always been clear in the Japanese games since its introduction in Generation I. However, it was only revealed years later in English games, once the Clefairy doll sprite debuted in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen.

Items introduced in Generation II

  • Secret Potion (Japanese: ひでんのくすり Secret Medicine). This item is a pouch of pills. This is consistent with its Japanese name, but may conflict with its English name.
    • Much like the Potion and its improved variants introduced in Generation I, the Secret Potion includes the Japanese word くすり Medicine (which does not indicate what exactly what kind of medicine), but was converted to the word "Potion" (which would indicate a form of liquid substance). When the Secret Potion debuted in Generation II, items did not have in-game sprites, so its appearance had not been established yet. Secret Potion's depiction as a pouch of pills was introduced years later as the item sprite in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, but its English name remained.
    • However, in the anime episode Machoke, Machoke Man!, Secret Potion is depicted as a bottle of medicine, which is consistent with both the Japanese and English names. This predates the introduction of the pouch of pills sprite.
  • Rainbow Wing and Silver Wing are single feathers in Japanese, but their English names changed to wings instead. In particular, there is no indication in the English Generation II games that these items were originally supposed to be feathers, because these games don't have item sprites. Their item sprites (depicting them as single feathers) debuted in the Generation IV remakes, but their names remained as before, with the word "Wing".
    • Rainbow Wing (Japanese: 虹色の羽根 Rainbow Feather)
    • Silver Wing (Japanese: ぎんいろのはね Silver Feather)

Items introduced in Generation III

  • The five condition-related Scarves are Bandannas in Japanese. The English name "Scarf" implies they are worn around the neck, but the Japanese name "Bandanna" implies they are worn at the top of the head.
    • Blue Scarf (Japanese: あおいバンダナ Blue Bandanna)
    • Green Scarf (Japanese: みどりのバンダナ Green Bandanna)
    • Pink Scarf (Japanese: ピンクのバンダナ Pink Bandanna)
    • Red Scarf (Japanese: あかいバンダナ Red Bandanna)
    • Yellow Scarf (Japanese: きいろのバンダナ Yellow Bandanna)
  • Fluffy Tail (Japanese: エネコのシッポ Eneco's Tail). The Japanese name indicates that it's a Skitty's tail. However, the English item name does not mention Skitty.
    • In particular, the species of Fluffy Tail is not revealed in the English version of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, because this game doesn't have item sprites. The item sprite depicting a Skitty's tail debuted in Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen (however, this item is unavailable in this game outside of trades).

Items introduced in Generation IV

  • The three evolution stones introduced in this generation have different names in English and Japanese, although their meanings are related to some extent.
    • Shiny Stone (Japanese: ひかりのいし Light Stone)
    • Dusk Stone (Japanese: やみのいし Darkness Stone)
    • Dawn Stone (Japanese: めざめいし Awakening Stone)
  • Lunar Wing (Japanese: みかづきのはね Crescent Moon Feather). Much like the Generation II items Rainbow Wing and Silver Wing, the Lunar Wing is a single feather in Japanese, but is named "Wing" in English. Additionally, the Japanese name is exactly about the crescent moon, while the English name simply references the moon.

Items introduced in Generation V

Items introduced in Generation VII

  • The Bottle Cap's Japanese name includes the fact that it's silver. This is similar to the Gold Bottle Cap, which kept the reference to gold in English.
    • Bottle Cap (Japanese: ぎんのおうかん Silver Bottle Cap)
    • Gold Bottle Cap (Japanese: きんのおうかん Gold Bottle Cap)
  • Beast Ball (Japanese: ウルトラボール Ultra Ball). Both the Japanese and English names reference the fact that it was developed to catch Ultra Beasts. Its name changed in the English localization because the Japanese name was already taken by another Poké Ball variant introduced in Generation I, the Ultra Ball.
  • The Lure's Japanese name is similar to repel, but むしよけ Repellent is replaced by むしよせ Attractant; both terms involve むし Insect. The Lure and its improved variants include the word コロン Cologne in Japanese, indicating their design; however, this word is absent in the English names, being replaced by "Lure". Additionally, むしよせ Attractant is not found in the Japanese names of Super Lure and Max Lure. Much like the Repel variants, the Super Lure and Max Lure are ranked as "Silver" and "Gold" in Japanese; these words were replaced by "Super" and "Max" in English.
    • Lure (Japanese: むしよせコロン Attractant Cologne)
    • Super Lure (Japanese: シルバーコロン Silver Cologne)
    • Max Lure (Japanese: ゴールドコロン Gold Cologne)

Items introduced in Generation VIII

  • All the seven Sweets that cause Milcery to evolve into Alcremie are amezaiku (a form of Japanese candy craft artistry) according to their Japanese names.
    • Strawberry Sweet (Japanese: いちごアメざいく Strawberry Amezaiku)
    • Love Sweet (Japanese: ハートアメざいく Heart Amezaiku)
      • The word "Heart" found in the Japanese item name is a more literal description of its shape, while "Love" is an abstract concept.
    • Berry Sweet (Japanese: ベリーアメざいく Berry Amezaiku)
    • Clover Sweet (Japanese: よつばアメざいく Four-Leaf Amezaiku)
    • Flower Sweet (Japanese: おはなアメざいく Flower Amezaiku)
    • Star Sweet (Japanese: スターアメざいく Star Amezaiku)
    • Ribbon Sweet (Japanese: リボンアメざいく Ribbon Amezaiku)

In the core series

050Diglett.png This section is incomplete.
Please feel free to edit this section to add missing information and complete it.
Reason: Add more regional differences
  • In all core series games, the player writes a report (Japanese: レポート report) when saving the game. This "report" option is found at the Japanese version main menu. The references to writing a report were simply translated as saving the game.
  • The units of measurement used for the Pokémon's height and weight (as seen in the Pokédex) depend on the game language.
    • Japanese games: height in meters, weight in kilograms
    • American games: height in feet and inches, weight in pounds
  • From Generation II onwards, the Pokédex is able to sort Pokémon by their katakana name in the Japanese version, or alphabetically in the localized versions.
  • Some Pokémon games have multiple optional names for the player character and/or rival. These names are often different on each language version. For instance, a character may have different optional names in Japanese, English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Korean.

Generation I

Pokémon Red, Blue, and Yellow

  • The first pair of games in Japan was Pokémon Red and Green, followed by Blue as the third core series game, which included a graphics and sound upgrade, as well as the removal of several known glitches that had been found in the original pair. In the localizations, the first pair of games was Pokémon Red and Blue, which had the same game-exclusive Pokémon available as Pokémon Red and Green, and also kept the improvements from the Japanese Pokémon Blue.
  • The English and other international versions of Pokémon Yellow are colorized when played on either the Game Boy Color or the Virtual Console. However, the Japanese version of this game is black and white in both game systems.
  • In the Japanese version, the Kanto Badges are named after colors. In the English version, most Kanto Badges were renamed. For instance, "グレーバッジ" (Gray Badge) was translated as "Boulder Badge". The only Kanto Badge that kept its Japanese name in the English Localization (only written with English letters instead of Japanese katakana) was Erika's Rainbow Badge.
  • In the Japanese version, the Pokémon's level is repeated in the first and second stats screens. In other language versions, the level is only shown in the first screen.
  • In the player's bedroom, the video game console depends on the game and language:
    • Famicon (in the Japanese version of all Generation I games, except for Pokémon Yellow)
    • Super Famicon (in the Japanese version of Pokémon Yellow)
    • SNES (in the international versions of all Generation I games)
  • The film on TV at the player's living room depends on the game's language.
    • In all languages except French, a movie involving four boys walking on railroad tracks, possibly a reference to Stand by Me.
    • In the French version of the Generation I games, an animated cartoon featuring a boy with a monkey tail (French: "Un dessin animé! Un petit garçon avec une queue de singe."), possibly a reference to young Son Goku from Dragon Ball, or alternatively, young Son Gohan from the sequel Dragon Ball Z.
  • In the Japanese version, the Town Map has a border around the map, and the place name is displayed on a short blank space at the top-left corner outside that border. In the international versions, that border was removed, and the place name is displayed on a blank line above the map, leaving more space for longer place names.
  • In the Japanese version, the Kanto region is mentioned if the player interacts with the Town Map in Daisy's house (if the map has not been obtained yet). However, Kanto is not mentioned in the international versions.
    • This is the only in-game mention of the Kanto region in the Japanese version of these games. Therefore, Kanto is not mentioned at all in the international versions.
The Game Boy Color mode's yellow palette
  • In Japanese Yellow on Game Boy Color mode, the game uses a yellow palette similarly to how Red, Green, and Blue use their respective red, green, and blue palettes. In Western Yellow, Game Boy Color mode instead uses the Super Game Boy palettes but with more saturated colors. The yellow palette from Japanese Yellow is used by Western Yellow in certain situations like Pikachu's Beach hi-score screen and it can be reinstated completely by modifying the ROM
  • In the Japanese version of all Kanto-based games, the old man passed out drunk at the start of the game, hence why he blocks the way out of Viridian City at the start of the game. In the English version, he is grumpy due to not having had his coffee yet.
  • In the Japanese version of the Generation I games, the Kanto region is mentioned in Town Map's text description, but Kanto is not mentioned in the international versions. This description is seen if the player interacts with the Town Map on Daisy's table prior to obtaining it.
  • Because Pokémon Red and Blue's script is based on a translation of the script of Pokémon Blue but use the in-game trades from Pokémon Red and Green, two translation errors related to these trades occur.
    • The man who trades the player an Electrode on Cinnabar Island claims that the Raichu he received "went and evolved". As Raichu does not have an evolved form, this is not possible. In the context of Japanese Pokémon Blue, it makes sense as the player trades away a Kadabra, which evolves through trade, for a Graveler.
    • The old man who trades the player a Jynx in Cerulean City claims that the Poliwhirl he received "went and evolved". As Poliwhirl cannot evolve via trade in Generation I, this is not possible. In the context of Japanese Pokémon Blue, the old man trades away a Haunter for a Machoke, which does evolve through trade.
  • When encountering a Pokémon using a fishing rod, the game says "The hooked <POKÈMON> attacked!" In the Spanish localization, this was erroneously translated to "¡El malvado <POKéMON> atacó!". The word "malvado" translates roughly to "wicked" or "evil."
  • The acronym for TM in the French localization of the games is CT. It is used incorrectly in one area of the game. When the player exchanged Lemonade for CT49, the text reads "TM49... TRIPLATTAQUE!".
  • In the Spanish and Italian localizations of the games, both versions erroneously refer to Squirtle's shell as "concha" and "conchiglia" which translates to "seashell" in Spanish and Italian respectively.
  • In the Japanese Pokémon Red, Green, Blue, and later Yellow; the moves Absorb, Mega Drain, Leech Life, and Dream Eater will fail if the foe or opponent Pokémon has a substitute active on the field. This was fixed in all localizations. The error reappears in Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal and Pokémon Stadium. This error was later fixed in Generation III.
  • In the Japanese Pokémon Red and Green, Nidoqueen's weight is listed as 6.0 kg. This was corrected in the Japanese Pokémon Blue to 60.0 kg. Geodude is also affected as its weight in the Japanese Pokémon Red and Green is listed as 2.0 kg, this was also corrected in the Japanese Pokémon Blue to 20.0 kg.
  • In the Japanese version, there are butsudan (Buddhist shrines) in some Celadon City buildings, but they were changed to sculptures of Diglett in the English version. They return the text "ぶつだん だ……" (It's a butsudan...) in Japanese, but "It's a sculpture of DIGLETT." in English.
  • In the Japanese version of all Kanto-based games, the characters Erik (Japanese: コージ Kōji) and Sara (Japanese: アツコ Atsuko) may be cameos of Kōji Nishino and Atsuko Nishida. They failed to meet each other due to a misunderstanding on the word "とり" (tori), which is also a pun. Erik used a bird Pokémon to arrive at Fuchsia City ("tori Pokémon" means "bird Pokémon"), while Sara is waiting for him inside the Safari ZoneRBY/GO ParkPE ("Pokémon tori" means "obtain Pokémon"). This pun was lost in the English localizations. Additionally, in the English version of the Generation I and III games, Sara says that Erik is her boyfriend (which is not the case in the Japanese version of all games, and is also not said in the English version of the Generation VII games).

Spr 1y 124.png
Spr b g1 124.png

Spr 1y 124 vc.png
Spr b g1 124 vc.png

Jynx's original sprite
(GBC mode)
Jynx's recolored
Virtual Console sprite

Generation II

Pokémon Gold, Silver, and Crystal

  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, the stats and trade screens are vertically divided in two parts; in all other languages, they are divided horizontally.
  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, the Pokémon in the Pokémon Storage System's layout is enclosed in a text-box frame and the Pokémon list appears in the background. In the Western localizations, there is no frame surrounding the Pokémon but the Pokémon list appears in a text-box frame.
  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, the sign of Pokémon Centers in Johto have a Poké Ball drawing with the letters PC next to it. In the Western localizations, the sign was changed back to the one used in the Generation I games. The Pokémon Center signs in Kanto use the old design in all versions.
  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, SonicBoom's animation is a shock wave hitting the opponent. For undisclosed reasons, it was changed to a tornado hitting the opponent in the Western localizations, making it very similar to Gust.
  • In the Japanese version, the butsudan (Buddhist shrines) return in some Celadon City buildings, and now there are butsudan in Violet City, Azalea Town, Ecruteak City, Mahogany Town, and the Mt. Moon Gift Shop as well. This time, they return the text "ぶつだん だ…… うーん おせんこうの におい" (It's a butsudan... Hmm, the smell of incense.) in Japanese and "What is this? Oh, it's an incense burner!" in English.
    • Kurt's house has butsudan with a different text, mentioning the the "god" (kami-sama) of the forest, which was changed to "protector" in the localization; in either case, this is a reference to Celebi. This butsudan returns "もりのかみさまを まつってある" (This is to worship the god of the forest.) in Japanese and "It's a statue of the forest's protector." in English. In the Generation IV remakes, this shrine remains in Kurt's house, except the player can't interact it.
  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, Pokéfan Alex in Route 13 has three Pokémon with "king" in their names: Nidoking, Slowking, and Magikarp (Koiking). In the localized versions, Magikarp was changed to Seaking to keep this theme. However, this change was not replicated in the Generation IV remakes, in which Magikarp is kept in all versions.
  • Miracle Cycle is not named in the localized versions.
  • In the Japanese version, the PC storage system has 9 boxes with 30 Pokémon each instead of 14 boxes with 20 Pokémon each.
  • Pokémon Gold and Silver are the only pre-Generation IV Pokémon games ever released in and localized for South Korea prior to the foundation of both Nintendo of Korea and Pokémon Korea in 2006. Nevertheless, the Time Capsule is available in the Korean versions of Gold and Silver.
  • The Japanese Super Game Boy border of Pokémon Gold (labeled POCKET MONSTERS GOLD VERSION), but not of Pokémon Silver, is present but unused in all releases of Pokémon Crystal. Similarly, in the Korean releases of Gold and Silver, the English Super Game Boy borders (respectively labeled POKéMON GOLD VERSION and POKéMON SILVER VERSION) are present but unused, since they only support the Game Boy Color.
  • In the Korean versions, the credits are presented in English. The Japanese games would later replicate this in Generation V but only when character mode is set to kanji.
  • Due to a possible oversight in the international versions, the Japanese quotation marks are used in certain parts of the dialogue, like in radio stations. This was corrected in Crystal.
  • During battles in Pokémon Crystal, Japanese midline horizontal ellipses ("⋯") are used in the English versions instead of regular ellipses ("…") due to an oversight.
  • In the Japanese version of Pokémon Crystal, a researcher at the Ruins of Alph claims that the Pokémon Communication Center in Goldenrod City influences the Unown. His unused English text is: According to my research... Those mysterious patterns appeared when the Pokécom Center was built. It must mean that radio waves have some sort of a link...
  • Pokémon Crystal version is the last localized core series game to use the slogan Gotta catch 'em all!.
  • The Japanese version of Pokémon Crystal has an emblem of Suicune's crest on the back of the Game Pak's circuit board.
  • In the Western releases, un-nicknamed Nidoran has the gender symbol shown twice, once by the name and once by the level indicator. This is not case in the Japanese and Korean versions, where all Pokémon have the gender symbol placed after their name, rather than by the level indicator.
  • As the Mobile Game Boy Adapter was not released outside of Japan, all related features were removed in localized versions of Pokémon Crystal, with the exception of the Odd Egg. The Virtual Console release finally allowed international players to have a chance to receive the GS Ball after entering the Hall of Fame.
  • Pokémon Gold and Silver can be played either on the Game Boy or the Game Boy Color in all languages except Korean. However, the Korean version of these games is only compatible with the Game Boy Color.
  • In the Japanese and Korean versions, Phanpy and Donphan are found in the wild in Pokémon Gold while Teddiursa and Ursaring are found in the wild in Pokémon Silver. In the Western localizations, these were switched. This change was not replicated in the international versions of Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.
  • The Korean versions of the games can only be played on the Game Boy Color, due to the need for more memory in order to properly render the Korean characters.
  • Nineteen Pokémon, including Jynx, as well as five Trainers, had their sprites changed between the Japanese and Western versions. The Korean versions use the same sprites as the Japanese versions. The changes made for Western versions were also taken into account for the Japanese and Western versions of Pokémon Crystal, although they were instead incorporated in the new sprites.

Spr GS Beauty JP.png

Spr GS Beauty.png

Spr GS Sage JP.png

Spr GS Sage.png

Spr GS Medium JP.png

Spr GS Medium.png

Beauty - Japan / South Korea Sprite International - Longer shorts, no longer winks Sage - Japan / South Korea Sprite International - No longer prays Medium - Japan / South Korea Sprite International - No longer carries beads

Spr GS Swimmer F JP.png

Spr GS Swimmer F.png

Spr GS Fisher JP.png

Spr GS Fisher.png

Spr 2s 079 jp.png
Spr 2s 079 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 079 s jp.png

Swimmer♀ - Japan / South Korea Sprite International - No longer winks Fisher - Japan / South Korea Sprite International - No longer smokes Silver (Japan) - Striped belly Silver (Japan) - Shiny back

Spr 2s 079.png
Spr 2s 079 s.png

Spr b 2g 079 s.png

Spr 2g 124 jp.png
Spr 2g 124 s jp.png

Spr 2s 124 jp.png
Spr 2s 124 s jp.png

Spr 2c 124 jp.png
Spr 2c 124 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 124 jp.png
Spr b 2g 124 s jp.png

Silver (international) - Stripes on belly removed Silver (international) - Shiny back color change Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan) Crystal (Japan) Gold/Silver (Japan)

Spr b 2c 124 jp.png
Spr b 2c 124 s jp.png

Spr 2g 124.png
Spr 2g 124 s.png

Spr 2s 124.png
Spr 2s 124 s.png

Spr 2c 124.png
Spr 2c 124 s.png

Spr b 2g 124.png
Spr b 2g 124 s.png

Spr b 2c 124.png
Spr b 2c 124 s.png

Crystal (Japan) Gold (international) - skin color change Silver (international) - skin color change Crystal (international) - skin color change Gold/Silver (international) - skin color change Crystal (international) - skin color change

Spr b 2g 127 jp.png
Spr b 2g 127 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 127.png
Spr b 2g 127 s.png

Spr 2g 160 jp.png
Spr 2g 160 s jp.png

Spr 2s 160 jp.png
Spr 2s 160 s jp.png

Spr 2g 160.png
Spr 2g 160 s.png

Spr 2s 160.png
Spr 2s 160 s.png

Gold/Silver (Japan) - Pinsir's back has a stripe Gold/Silver (international) - Pinsir's back has a round mark Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan) Gold (international) - Feraligatr's extra stripe has been removed Silver (international) - Feraligatr's extra stripe has been removed

Spr 2g 171 jp.png
Spr 2g 171 s jp.png

Spr 2s 171 jp.png
Spr 2s 171 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 171 jp.png
Spr b 2g 171 s jp.png

Spr 2g 171.png
Spr 2g 171 s.png

Spr 2s 171.png
Spr 2s 171 s.png

Spr b 2g 171.png
Spr b 2g 171 s.png

Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan) Back sprites (Japan) Gold (international) - Lanturn's yellow face marks have been removed Silver (international) - Lanturn's yellow face marks have been removed Back sprites (international) - Lanturn's yellow face marks have been removed

Spr 2g 172 jp.png
Spr 2g 172 s jp.png

Spr 2s 172 jp.png
Spr 2s 172 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 172 jp.png
Spr b 2g 172 s jp.png

Spr 2g 172.png
Spr 2g 172 s.png

Spr 2s 172.png
Spr 2s 172 s.png

Spr b 2g 172.png
Spr b 2g 172 s.png

Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan) Back sprites (Japan) Gold (international) - Pichu's neck pattern was altered Silver (international) - Pichu's neck pattern was altered Back sprites (international) - Pichu's neck pattern was altered

Spr b 2g 180 jp.png
Spr b 2g 180 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 180.png
Spr b 2g 180 s.png

Spr b 2g 186 jp.png
Spr b 2g 186 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 186.png
Spr b 2g 186 s.png

Spr 2g 190 jp.png
Spr 2g 190 s jp.png

Spr 2s 190 jp.png
Spr 2s 190 s jp.png

Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Flaaffy's hair was merged Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Politoed's extra spots were removed Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan)

Spr 2g 190.png
Spr 2g 190 s.png

Spr 2s 190.png
Spr 2s 190 s.png

Spr b 2g 191 jp.png
Spr b 2g 191 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 191.png
Spr b 2g 191 s.png

Spr b 2g 194 jp.png
Spr b 2g 194 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 194.png
Spr b 2g 194 s.png

Gold (international) - Aipom's belly was altered Silver (international) - Aipom's belly was altered Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Sunkern's back pattern was altered Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Wooper's back stripe was removed

Spr b 2g 203 jp.png
Spr b 2g 203 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 203.png
Spr b 2g 203 s.png

Spr b 2g 211 jp.png
Spr b 2g 211 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 211.png
Spr b 2g 211 s.png

Spr 2g 215 jp.png
Spr 2g 215 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 215 jp.png
Spr b 2g 215 s jp.png

Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Girafarig's neck stripes were moved slightly Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Qwilfish's tail fin pattern was altered Gold/Silver (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan)

Spr 2g 215.png
Spr 2g 215 s.png

Spr b 2g 215.png
Spr b 2g 215 s.png

Spr 2s 216 jp.png
Spr 2s 216 s jp.png

Spr 2s 216.png
Spr 2s 216 s.png

Spr b 2g 218 jp.png
Spr b 2g 218 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 218.png
Spr b 2g 218 s.png

Gold/Silver (international) - Sneasel's eye was altered Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Sneasel's ear had a detail added Silver sprite (Japan) Silver (international) - Teddiursa had white spots added to their feet Gold/Silver (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Slugma's back bumps were removed

Spr 2s 232 jp.png
Spr 2s 232 s jp.png

Spr 2s 232.png
Spr 2s 232 s.png

Spr 2g 234 jp.png
Spr 2g 234 s jp.png

Spr 2s 234 jp.png
Spr 2s 234 s jp.png

Spr 2g 234.png
Spr 2g 234 s.png

Spr 2s 234.png
Spr 2s 234 s.png

Silver (Japan) Silver (international) - Donphan's trunk was altered, along with their eyes and mouth Gold (Japan) Silver (Japan) Gold (international) - Stantler had spots added to their back Silver (international) - Stantler had spots added to their back

Spr 2s 242 jp.png
Spr 2s 242 s jp.png

Spr 2s 242.png
Spr 2s 242 s.png

Spr b 2g 247 jp.png
Spr b 2g 247 s jp.png

Spr b 2g 247.png
Spr b 2g 247 s.png

Silver (Japan) Silver (international) - Blissey's wing pattern extends a little over her arm Gold/Silver back sprite (Japan) Gold/Silver back sprite (international) - Pupitar has one less stripe

Generation III

Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald

  • The ledge in southwestern section of Victory Road B1F in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire was made one tile shorter in non-English European versions of the game, making that part of the floor two-way instead of one-way.
  • A portion of the fourth room in Trick House in Pokémon Emerald has been altered in international versions, to make it harder for player to trap themselves and be forced to start the puzzle from the beginning.
  • Several glitches were fixed in the international releases.
  • The VU Meter in the Pokédex was altered depending on which international version was being played.
  • Pokémon Battle-e Trainer cards request screen was changed in international releases.
  • Some of the Trainer sprites are different in Japanese and international versions.
Spr RS Hex Maniac JP.png Spr RS Hex Maniac.png Spr RS Psychic F JP.png Spr RS Psychic F.png
Hex Maniac sprite from Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald (JP) Hex Maniac sprite from Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald Female Psychic sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald (JP)
Female Psychic sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald
Spr RS Cooltrainer M JP.png Spr RS Cooltrainer M.png Spr RS Sailor JP.png Spr RS Sailor.png
Male Cooltrainer sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald (JP)
Male Cooltrainer sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald
Sailor sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald (JP)
Sailor sprite from
Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald

Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen

  • In the original Japanese version, the blue and pink font color is used only for the Continue button on title screen, with NPC's gender changing the font style instead.
  • On the title screens, the Japanese versions say PRESS START BUTTON while international releases just say PRESS START.
  • The name entry screen in Japanese versions only allows for five characters in a name, the international releases changed the character limit from five to seven.
  • In the player's bedroom, the Japanese version contains a Famicon, while international releases contain a NES instead.
  • The film on TV at the player's living room depends on the player's gender and game's language.
    • In all languages except French:
      • If the player is male, a movie involving four boys walking on railroad tracks, possibly a reference to Stand by Me.
      • If the player is female, a movie featuring a girl in pigtails walking down a brick road, possibly a reference to The Wizard of Oz.
    • In French:
      • If the player is male, a movie featuring a "cool guy in a taxi" (French: "Y'a un gars cool dans un taxi."), possibly a reference to the 1998 French movie Taxi.
      • If the player is female, The Lord of the Rings is mentioned by name.
  • In international releases, the Lv icon on battle screens was moved to the right corner and the level number was made normal instead of bold. and symbols were also given a slight alteration.
  • Poké Center and Poké Mart signs were altered between regional releases.
  • In Trainer Tower, the international releases had e-Reader battle card compatibilities removed as those cards were never released outside of Japan due to the poor sales of the e-Reader in the US.
  • In European versions of the Pokémon Firered and Leafgreen, the Nugget Bridge Rocket Grunt glitch was patched. This prevents the player from getting unlimited Nuggets.

Generation IV

Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum

  • In the Japanese version of the Sinnoh myths, the Sinnoh Folk Story 3 refers to Pokémon and people marrying each other. In the English version, the marriage is not mentioned; instead, it says Pokémon and people would eat together at the same table.
  • In the Japanese version of Pokémon Platinum, a glitch can occur on Route 225 where the player is stuck in a loop of battling Ace Trainer Deanna until the Player is no longer able to battle. This was fixed in the international version.
  • The dialogue at the Veilstone Game Corner was altered in the European and Korean versions of Pokémon Platinum to comply with PEGI's then new standards regarding gambling in video games.
  • In the non-English European versions of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, Registeel's sprite was edited because of its arm. The arm's original position is reminiscent of the Nazi salute. This change was retained in all releases of Pokémon Platinum and Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver.

Spr 4d 379.png
Spr 4d 379 s.png

Spr 4p 379.png
Spr 4p 379 s.png

Original Diamond and Pearl sprite Non-English European Diamond and Pearl sprite

Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver

  • In all international versions, the slot machines were replaced with a Minesweeper style game called Voltorb Flip.
  • In the Korean versions of Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, Sage's sprite was altered to remove the prayer beads in his hands and gave him a sash.
Spr HGSS Sage.png Spr HGSS Sage KO.png
Sprite from
HeartGold and SoulSilver
(JP/INTL)
Sprite from
HeartGold and SoulSilver
(KO)

Generation V

  • In all Generation V core games, Pokémon such as Cofagrigus, Froslass, Nosepass, and Probopass cannot be traded through the GTS unless they are given a nickname due to the word filter in the games. This was fixed from Generation VI onwards so that they did not need a name change to be traded.

Pokémon Black and White

  • The Online Battle name differs between regions.
  • The chance that Poison Touch will poison the target was changed from 20% to 30% in international versions.
  • The symbol used in the move Imprison was changed in the international versions.
  • The amount of C-Gear skins distributed differed between regions; Japanese versions had 31 skins, North American versions had 22 skins, and European versions had 25 skins.
  • As Victini is a Shiny Locked Pokémon, its shiny form can never be obtained. In Japanese versions if the game generated a value that would cause Victini to be shiny, the battle would never begin, this was fixed in international versions.

Pokémon Black 2 and White 2

  • The lyrics for the Virbank Gym music differ between the Japanese and international releases. In Japanese versions, she spells out "Dogars" which is Koffing's Japanese name. In the international versions she spells out "Pokémon" and does not start the song by saying "1, 2, 3, 4!"
  • After entering the Hall of Fame, there is a post-game story section where the player follows N's Zoroark to N's Castle. In Japanese versions, if the player exits out of the cave that Zoroark just went into instead of following them, it causes the game to softlock. This was fixed in international versions.

In the side series

Pokémon Stadium series

  • In Japan, there were three games in the Pokémon Stadium series.
    • Pokémon Stadium (Japanese: ポケモンスタジアム Pokémon Stadium), with only 42 Generation I Pokémon available. This game was not released in English.
    • Pokémon Stadium (Japanese: ポケモンスタジアム2 Pokémon Stadium 2), with the Generation I Pokémon available. This was the first game of the series released in English.
    • Pokémon Stadium 2 (Japanese: ポケモンスタジアム 金銀 Pokémon Stadium Gold and Silver), with the Generation I and II Pokémon available. This was the second game of the series released in English.
  • The player may connect up to four core series games to any of the three Pokémon Stadium games using the Transfer Pak (Generation I core series games are compatible with all three Stadium games; Generation II core series games are only compatible with Pokémon Stadium 2). However, the compatibility also depends on the language of the games.
    • The American and European versions are compatible with each other. For instance, the player may connect the French version of Pokémon Stadium to the German version of Pokémon Red.
    • The Japanese games in the Pokémon Stadium series are only compatible with Japanese core series games.
    • The Korean versions of Pokémon Gold and Silver are not compatible with any game in the Pokémon Stadium series.
  • The Pikachu's voice heard upon launch was instead people's voices in the Japanese version.

Pokémon Stadium

  • The Japanese version has six Stadium Cups. In addition to the Pika, Petit, and Prime Cups, there are three cups based upon official tournaments: the Nintendo Cup '97, Nintendo Cup '98, and Nintendo Cup '99. In the international versions, the Nintendo Cups were replaced with the Poké Cup from Pokémon Yellow's Colosseum 2.
  • Several rental Pokémon had their movesets changed between the Japanese and localized versions.
  • A gallery mode was added, but only in the American version (it is absent in Japanese and European versions).
    • In the Japanese and European versions, the main menu has the "options" button in the middle, below the "Pokémon Stadium" option. In the American version, the "gallery" button was added where the "options" would be in other games, and the "options" button was moved to the right side.
  • Pikachu can be taught Surf under special conditions. Japanese players could teach a Pikachu Surf in the original Pokémon Stadium.
  • The number of teams that could be registered was decreased from 12 to 10.
  • In Clefairy Says, the Clefairy sing rather than repeat the same sound effect.

Pokémon Colosseum

In spin-off games

Pokémon Trading Card Game

  • Booster pack images were changed between localizations to reflect the art style used for booster packs by region.
  • The title screen was changed between the Japanese and international releases.
  • The Super Game Boy border in international releases removes the writing of Pokémon • Trading • Card • Game • on the Poké Balls.
  • The back of Pokémon cards was changed in international releases to the design used on the back of cards outside of Japan.
  • In the Japanese version, the symbol for a paralyzed Pokémon are two vertical jagged lines (TCG GB paralyzed JP.png). In the American and European versions, the symbol is a horizontal jagged line (TCG GB paralyzed INT.png).
  • The artwork for Jynx Lv. 23's face was changed from black to purple in international releases to avoid further controversy. The background of the card was also changed from dark purple to light purple in the Virtual Console release.
  • When the player tries to save an unnamed deck in the Japanese version, the player name is included in the default deck name. In all other languages, the player name is not included. For instance, if the player is named "パーク" (Park) in the Japanese version, the first default name used for an unnamed deck is "パークの001デッキ" (Park's 001 Deck). In the English version, the first default name is simply "001 Deck"
  • In the Japanese version of Pokémon Trading Card Game, Imakuni? says that he sings the Can You Name All the Pokémon?, which is a true statement in real life. However, in the English localization, Imakuni? mentions that he sings the Pokérap instead. Both Can You Name All the Pokémon? and the Kanto Pokérap are songs listing the Generation I Pokémon.

Hey You, Pikachu!

  • Certain items have been changed:
    • The rice ball (an item that Pikachu can eat) was changed to a cupcake.
    • In Japanese version, the corn in garden is eggplants instead. Due to this, popcorn is not present in these versions.
    • In Viridan Forest, the player finds cattails instead of horsetails.
    • In Springleaf Field, the Morning glory flower is recolored to resemble a Bluebell instead.
  • In the US release, the shoes outside the player's room are missing. In Japan, it is customary to take off shoes before walking into a building or home. In the US it is common to walk into buildings or homes with shoes still on.
  • The Pokémon cries have been changed to localized ones.
  • In the English release, when the player is speaking, a bubble is shown to indicate that the player's voice is being detected by the microphone. In the Japanese release, the bubble only appears if the player is directly addressing Pikachu.
  • The Suikawari minigame in Cobalt Coast was changed to a piñata smashing game. When Pikachu loses in the Japanese version, he receives a soda can pull tab, in the English version he receives a bottle cap ring instead.
  • The Nintendo 64 in the Japanese version contains a Super Nintendo game, this was fixed in the English release to be a Nintendo 64 game instead.

Pokémon Channel

  • The language that plays in the Pichu Brothers channel changes depending on the regional version of the game.

Pokémon Pinball

  • The European release features a menu when starting up the game that lets the player select which language they want to play the game in.
  • On the Copyright screen in the English and European versions, the games list Creatures Inc. and HAL Laboratory, Inc. instead of Creatures and HAL Laboratory. The European release was further edited to show it was released later than the Japanese and English releases.
  • On the Title screen, Pikachu is smiling in the international releases. The European release corrects Poké Dex to POKéDEX.
  • The European release gives two options for how strong the Rumble feature is in the Options menu with the options of Mild and Strong. The English and Japanese releases only have an Off and On setting. Additionally, the M in RUMBLE is slightly wider in the European release.
  • The control scheme options were simplified to three predefined options in the European release.
  • The Super Game Boy border is different between releases. The Japanese release lacks a ("TM") symbol. The European release features a large vibrant blue font of Pokémon Pinball.
  • The four lights in the out lanes and return lanes spell out CAVE in the international release and HOLE in the Japanese release.
  • The Japanese version of the game spells out "GET" instead of "CATCH!" while capturing a Pokémon.

Pokémon Puzzle League

  • The hidden developer love message depends on if the game is the Japanese or international version.

Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team and Blue Rescue Team

  • In Japanese and Korean versions of the game, the recruit list has species name alongside the nickname. In the localization, only the nickname (if any) is displayed.
  • The Japanese version of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team had a game breaking bug which would erase all the save data of any game in the Gameboy Advance slot. This bug was fixed in international releases.

Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity

  • When first meeting Swanna in the English version of the game, she makes a statement that references Carly Rae Jepsen's song, "Call Me Maybe".
  • In the Japanese version, players are able to select the gender for their partner Pokémon. In the international versions, there is no gender selection.
    • Because of the lack of gender selection and the fact that some languages have no gender-neutral pronoun, these languages use male pronouns.
Project Games logo.png This game-related article is part of Project Games, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive articles on the Pokémon games.
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