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Talk:Move data structure in Generation III

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Move name

I don't find the move name in the structure, so where is it ? Is there an external table for translations ? --Arcanis 05:56, 23 July 2010 (UTC)

Contact field

It's a heavy misnomer in my book. Only one of the flags it can have determines if there's any physical contact. A better name would be the generic "flags". Here's the possible values:

0x01 Target may flinch if the attacker has a King's Rock
0x02 Attack is checked for accuracy
0x04 Can be redirected back to the user by target's Snatch
0x08 Can be redirected back to the user by target's Magic Coat
0x10 Is affected by Protect and Detect.
0x20 User makes physical contact with the target

Snatch and Magic Coat are mutually exclusive. --Kyoufu Kawa 17:22, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

Perhaps its obvious...

There is a quite a few of the chunks of data listed in this substructure that do not have a description of how they work. Perhaps how they work is obvious and I am a fool for not getting it, but even if that is the case, it ought to be added for people such as myself.

Specifically I am speaking of the "Effect" field. It contains a byte of data, but how is that data stored? How is it to be interpreted. Also the accuracy section might need some clarification. The examples they give are rather confusing, although I think I understand now. I would edit it to fix the examples, but my understanding is only partial. And I don't wish to edit it and be wrong.

Regardless, this article has a lot of potential. As do all of the data structure articles.

Zellfaze 00:25, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

The effect field refers to which extra effect such as "burn the opponent" or "scatter spikes" should occur. Accuracy is how high a chance you have of having the move in general succeed, while the effect has it's own chance of occuring. For example, you could have three different moves: one has no special effect and an 80% chance to hit, so Effect and Effect Accuracy are zero, and Accuracy in general reflects the 80%. The others burn the target, but one always does so and the other only 50% of the time. Their effect bytes are equal, but their effect accuracies are not. Get it? --Kyoufu Kawa 15:31, 12 October 2009 (UTC)