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Jirachi: Wish Maker (manga)

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Jirachi: Wish Maker (Japanese: 七夜の願い星 ジラーチ Wishing Star of the Seven Nights: Jirachi) is the manga adaption of the movie of the same name. It was adapted by Oouchi Suigun.

Publications

Edition Country Company Date ISBN
First Edition by Shogakukan First
Edition
Japan Shogakukan July 19, 2003 ISBN 409143004X
First Edition by Chuang Yi First
Edition
Singapore Chuang Yi April 2005 ISBN 9812603824

Chapters

  1. The Fateful Meeting! (Japanese: A Fateful Encounter!! My First Partner)
  2. Enemies and Friends (Japanese: Enemies and Allies and Friends)
  3. Partner Gone!! (Japanese: The Captive Partner!!)
  4. Everlasting Bond...!! (Japanese: The Bond that Lasts Forever......!!)

Differences between the anime and the manga

  • In the movie, Max's first wish is for some candy, which Jirachi teleports over from a nearby shop. In the manga adaptation, Max gets upset with all of his friends pestering him to have their wishes granted first, so he ends up wishing that they would disappear, causing Jirachi to teleport them away until Max gets Jirachi to teleport them back.
  • In the anime, Jirachi is unconscious when it is kidnapped by Butler, and its Millennium Eye opens automatically. In the manga, Jirachi is awake for most of this scene, and Butler threatens to kill Max using a gun mounted on his machine if Jirachi doesn't open its Millennium Eye.
  • In the manga, Butler is able to cast spells and fire magic from his wand. In the movie, he never uses it as a weapon, only as a prop for his magic shows.

Trivia

  • In the English translation by Chuang Yi, many moves are translated from their Japanese names, rather than using the English names of the moves from the games. For example, Pikachu's Thunderbolt is translated as "100,000 Volts" rather than "Thunderbolt" and Torchic's Ember is translated as "Fire Sparks" rather than "Ember".

Related articles

External links



Movie manga adaptations
Mewtwo Strikes Back!Mirage Pokémon Lugia's Explosive BirthEmperor of the Crystal Tower: EnteiCelebi: a Timeless Encounter
Guardian Gods of the City of Water: Latias and LatiosJirachi: Wish MakerDestiny DeoxysLucario and the Mystery of Mew
Pokémon Ranger and the Temple of the SeaThe Rise of DarkraiGiratina and the Sky WarriorArceus and the Jewel of Life
Zoroark: Master of IllusionsWhite—Victini and ZekromKyurem VS. The Sword of JusticeGenesect and the Legend Awakened
The Cocoon of Destruction and Diancie


Project Manga logo.png This article is part of Project Manga, a Bulbapedia project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each series of Pokémon manga.