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Difference between revisions of "Experience"

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For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see {{cat|Pokémon in the Fluctuating experience group}}.
 
For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see {{cat|Pokémon in the Fluctuating experience group}}.
   
===Table===
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===Experience at each level===
Below is a table. On the left side of the level is the minimum number of experience points required for a Pokémon to be at that level, and the amount of experience points a Pokémon of that level will have when caught from the wild. On the right is the number of experience points required to advance from the respective level to the next level.
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Below is a table; on the left side of the level is the minimum number of experience points required for a Pokémon to be at that level, and the amount of experience points a Pokémon of that level will have when caught from the wild; on the right is the number of experience points required to advance from the respective level to the next level.
   
 
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Revision as of 10:36, 26 April 2013

Slow redirects here. For the move whose Japanese name means Slow, see Curse (move).

A graph of the experience required for Pokémon to level up, color-coded by experience types. Erratic is black, Fast is green, Medium Fast is yellow, Medium Slow is purple, Slow is brown, and Fluctuating is blue.
File:ExpGraphLv50.png
A graph only to level 50 for the experience required for level up. Colors are the same as above.

The amount of experience an individual Pokémon has is an indication of how much it has battled. In the games, it is quantified as experience points, which a Pokémon can gain in battle by defeating an opponent without fainting first. After a certain amount of experience points have been gained, a Pokémon will grow a level, with each subsequent level requiring more experience to gain, all the way up to level 100, where a Pokémon will no longer gain experience.

In the main series

In the main series games, experience is normally gained by all Pokémon who have been sent out against an opponent's Pokémon, divided evenly among them. Experience is gained upon the opponent Pokémon fainting, and its amount is calculated as a function of the fainted Pokémon's level as well as species. Certain items can affect the distribution and amount of experience gained, as can other conditions, such as whether or not the Pokémon was caught by another person or in another language of the game.

Relation to level

A graph of the ratio of the cumulative experience required to reach a certain level, to that level's numeral cubed

The amount of experience points a Pokémon has is tied directly to its level. Though the amount varies depending on species, always remaining consistent throughout an evolutionary family, a given amount of experience points will always set a Pokémon at the corresponding level. Wild Pokémon of any level will always have the base amount of experience required to reach that level when caught, as will Pokémon hatched from Eggs.

All Pokémon fall into one of six experience groups, four of which were introduced in Generation I and two of which were introduced in Generation III. The main difference between these experience groups is the amount of experience points required to reach level 100, and thus, the amount required to reach each level. All those introduced in Generation I are only polynomial functions of the level, while the two introduced in Generation III operate as piecewise functions, changing the equation depending on the level range.

All six functions are cubic functions of the level, but Erratic and Fluctuating are designed to have a constantly changing multiplier of this cube. Erratic has this multiplier go from high (2.0) to low (0.6), while Fluctuating has this multiplier go from low (0.48) to high (1.64).

The cubic nature of these formulas implies that the amount of experience points required to go from one level to the next is a quadratic function.

Though the various experience groups' level-up rates can be calculated using an equation, a lookup table is used in the games after Generation II, to prevent game slowdown and a glitch associated with the Medium Slow formula.

In Generation V the amount of experience gained is dependent on both Pokémon's levels: the lower the victor's level is compared to the defeated Pokémon, the more experience points the victor will gain.

Erratic

The equation for the Erratic experience group. At levels 50, 68, and 98, both formulas return equal values.

The Erratic experience group, one of the two groups introduced in Generation III, features the lowest level 100 value for experience, at only 600,000 points. Aside from Shieldon, Cranidos, and Finneon's families, all Pokémon in this experience group were introduced in Generation III as well, with most of them being Bug or Water types.

Receiving its name due to the highly erratic experience point requirement to reach the next level from level 68 to level 98, Pokémon in this group level up rather slowly in their lower levels, requiring the most experience to grow from level 1 to level 10 (1800 as compared to 1250 for Slow, the next highest requirement), and increase the rate of their growth at higher levels, requiring the least experience to grow from level 90 to level 100 (108654 points as compared to 216800 for Fast, the next lowest requirement).

Due to the erraticness of this function, it actually takes fewer experience points to go from level 99 to 100 than it does to go from level 69 to 70.

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Erratic experience group.


Fast

The equation for the Fast experience group

The Fast experience group is one of the four experience groups introduced in Generation I, with 800,000 experience points making for a level 100 Pokémon. Many common Normal-type Pokémon are in this group, among them the Chansey, Clefairy, and Jigglypuff families.

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Fast experience group.

Medium Fast

The equation for the Medium Fast experience group

Among all Pokémon, the most plentiful experience group is the Medium Fast group, which was also introduced in Generation I. Requiring Pokémon to have an even 1,000,000 experience points to be at level 100, it is by far the most average of the experience groups, and the one with the simplest equation: to be at a given level, any Pokémon in this group requires experience equal to that level cubed. This group is also often called "cubic", due to its function being a simple cube of the level.

This experience group actually grows more slowly than the Medium Slow group up until about level 68 (level 47, if considering amount of experience required to reach the next level).

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Medium Fast experience group.

Medium Slow

The equation for the Medium Slow experience group

The Medium Slow experience group, like the Medium Fast group, accounts for many Pokémon, containing the second largest amount of them. All normal starter Pokémon are in this group, as are several smaller legendaries, such as Mew and Shaymin. Requiring 1,059,860 experience points for a Pokémon to reach level 100, it is the only experience group whose level 100 experience is not evenly divisible by 10,000.

The inflection point for this polynomial function is actually at level 4, not level 0. Thus, it actually takes more experience points to go from level 2 to 3 than it does to go from 4 to 5. In Generations I and II, this mislocation of the inflection point causes the experience underflow glitch.

The starter Pokémon are all at level 5 at the start, and are all in the Medium Slow group, so it appears that the Medium Slow group's experience formula was calculated with the starter Pokémon in mind. It is the only function to do so - all the other functions, being simple multiples of the cube of the level, have inflection points at Level 0, meaning that the number of experience points required to advance one level will always increase as the level increases because the level is positive.

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Medium Slow experience group.

Slow

The equation for the Slow experience group.

The final of the four Generation I experience groups, the Slow group features the highest amount of experience required for a Pokémon to reach level 100 in Generations I and II, and the second highest amount since then. Containing many rare, powerful, and legendary Pokémon, Pokémon in this group are typically very hard to raise; all pseudo-legendary Pokémon, by definition, are in this experience group. At level 100, a Pokémon in this experience group will have 1,250,000 experience points.

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Slow experience group.

Fluctuating

The equation for the Fluctuating experience group. At levels 15 and 36, both formulas return equal values.

The second experience group introduced in Generation III, and a direct opposite to the Erratic group, the Fluctuating experience group contains the Pokémon which grow the slowest of all, reaching level 100 with a whopping 1,640,000 experience points. It is also, unsurprisingly, the smallest of the experience groups, containing only 14 species. Pokémon within this group require the least amount of experience to grow from level 1, needing only 540 points to reach level 10, as compared to 560 for Medium Slow, the next lowest requirement. They also require the most experience points to go from level 90 to 100 - 517340 as compared to 338750 for Slow, the next highest. Like the Erratic function, the Fluctuating group's level-up equation is calculated in a piecewise fashion.

Also like the Erratic experience group, the Fluctuating group gets its name from the wildly fluctuating requirement for each level to go to the next level, from Level 36 to Level 100.

For a list of all Pokémon in this group, see Pokémon in the Fluctuating experience group.

Experience at each level

Below is a table; on the left side of the level is the minimum number of experience points required for a Pokémon to be at that level, and the amount of experience points a Pokémon of that level will have when caught from the wild; on the right is the number of experience points required to advance from the respective level to the next level.

Experience gain in battle

Gaining experience in battle depends on the level and species of the Pokémon that was defeated in battle. The higher the level a Pokémon is, the more experience points it yields. In Generation V the amount of experience gained is dependent on both Pokémon's levels: the higher the defeated opponent's level is compared to the user, the more experience points the user will gain.

Several other things can affect the gain of experience. If more than one Pokémon is sent into battle, the gained experience calculated by the above calculation will be divided by how many were sent into battle. Note that in Generation V the Pokémon's own level is taken into account after dividing experience, meaning lower level Pokémon will get more experience than higher level Pokémon.

The Lucky Egg, Exp. All and Exp. Share can also further affect the gain of experience. If the Exp. All is in the Bag in Generation I, all members of the player's party will gain experience based on how many there are, as if all had been sent into battle. The Exp. Share and Lucky Egg, however, activate if held, with the Lucky Egg further multiplying experience gained by 1.5×, and the Exp. Share automatically giving half of the experience from a battle to the holder, leaving the rest to be distributed among those that actually participated (this can be exploited to give a Pokémon 3/4 of the battle's experience).

Finally, in Generation V the Pass Powers Exp. Point Power affects the amount of experience earned if it is active, by between 0.5× and 2× depending on the strength of the power.

Pokémon that faint do not gain any experience; however, if they are revived before the Pokémon they fought is defeated or switches out, they will still gain experience.

Gain formula

Formula for experience gain from battle (Generation I to IV)
Formula for experience gain from battle (Generation V)

Unlike the great variation in formulas among the six experience groups, there is only a single formula used to determine how much experience a Pokémon will gain from battle, to the right. In this formula:

  • a is equal to 1 if the fainted Pokémon is wild, and 1.5 if the fainted Pokémon is owned by a Trainer.
  • t is equal to 1 if the winning Pokémon's OT is its current owner, 1.5 if the Pokémon was gained in a domestic trade, and (from Generation IV onwards) 1.7 if the Pokémon was gained in an international trade.
  • b is the base experience yield of the fainted Pokémon's species, listed here.
  • e is equal to 1.5 if the winning Pokémon is holding a Lucky Egg, and 1 otherwise.
  • L is the level of the fainted Pokémon.
    • In Generation V, Lp is the level of the victorious Pokémon.
  • s is the number of Pokémon that participated in the battle and have not fainted. If any Pokémon in the party is holding an Exp. Share, s is equal to 2, and for the rest of the Pokémon, s is equal to twice the number of Pokémon that participated instead.
    • If more than one Pokémon is holding an Exp. Share, s is equal to twice the number of Pokémon holding the Exp. Share for each Pokémon holding one.
  • p is equal to 1 if no Exp. Point Power is active, or else equal to the following depending on the power: Power ↓↓↓: 0.5; Power ↓↓: 0.66; Power ↓: 0.8; Power ↑: 1.2; Power ↑↑: 1.5; Power ↑↑↑, Power S, Power MAX: 2.

In Generation V, the experience gain formula was revamped. The constant divisor of 7 was changed to 5, and a factor was added that took the battling Pokémon's level into account.

Also, a constant of 1 was added to each battle, presumably to prevent a defeated Pokémon from yielding no experience due to a very low ratio between levels.

Example (Generation I to IV)

An originally owned Skitty holding a Lucky Egg and an internationally traded Meowth have just defeated a Level 78 Trainer-owned Garchomp, with an originally owned Salamence in the winner's party holding an Exp. Share.

The base experience yield of a Garchomp is 218, meaning that a Level 78 Garchomp will normally yield 2429 experience points. Because the battle is a Trainer battle, this is multiplied by 1.5 to give 3643.

The Exp. Share will automatically give half the experience points to the Salamence, giving it 1821 experience points. The Skitty gets half of the remaining experience points, with a 1.5 multiplier because of the Lucky Egg. This means that the Skitty earns 1366 experience points.

The Meowth gets half of the remaining experience points, with a 1.7 multiplier because it was internationally traded. This means that the Meowth earns 1548 experience points.

Example (Generation V)

An internationally traded, level 55 Venusaur has just defeated a wild, level 62 Zekrom.

The base experience yield of Zekrom is 306, meaning that a level 62 Zekrom will normally yield 3794 experience points, when defeated by another Pokémon at level 62. However, this Venusaur is at level 55, meaning that it will yield 4338 experience points. The constant of 1 is added, giving 4339, and the international trade multiplies this by 1.7, meaning that this Zekrom will yield a total of 7376 experience points.

Experience underflow glitch

In Generation I and Generation II, level 1 Pokémon in the medium slow group were calculated to have -54 experience points. However, due to the use of unsigned integers, the program took this to be 16,777,162 experience points, and if a Pokémon did not gain enough experience points to wrap this number back down to zero, it would be considered to be at level 100 (having gone over the amount required to be level 100 by over 15 million experience points), and instantaneously jump to this level.

It is due to this bug that no level 1 Pokémon can be found in the wild without abusing a glitch or hacking the game. It is also for this reason that although level 2-4 Pokémon can be found wild, Pokémon hatched from Eggs at level 5 when Eggs were introduced in Generation II.

This glitch was finally addressed in Generation III, which uses a lookup table, rather than an actual formula, to determine level-up experience (this is also why the two new functions introduced in that generation are able to be piecewise functions). Despite this, Pokémon still hatched at level 5 in that generation. Level 1 Pokémon were not "legitimate" until Generation IV, the first generation in which level 1 Pokémon can be found in the wild and Eggs hatch into level 1 Pokémon.

In Generation I

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In Generation II

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In the spin-off games

In the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series

050Diglett.png This section is incomplete.
Please feel free to edit this section to add missing information and complete it.

Pokémon may also gain experience in the Mystery Dungeon series. After a Pokémon is defeated, each member of the team will gain the full share of experience points. The base amount of experience earned is floor((Base Experience) * (Level - 1) / 10) + (Base Experience).

If a Pokémon with experience is defeated using only regular attacks, the experience gain is only 50% (rounded down) of the base value. If at least one move was used against the foe (and, if it is an attack that deals damage, must deal at least 1 damage), or if the foe uses a move that targets itself or other enemy Pokémon, the experience gain is the full base value. If the qualifying attack is part of a linked move, the experience gain is 150% of the base value.

As with the main series of games, Pokémon acquiring enough experience points will level up. The amount needed differs from the main series games, and is defined differently for each Pokémon. It is not known if Pokémon can be grouped by experience growth as in the main games.

Unlike in the main games, Pokémon cannot evolve upon level up (or while in a dungeon in general), although level is a factor in determining whether or not they can evolve.

In the Pokémon Ranger series

In the Pokémon Ranger games, experience is acquired in an entirely different way from in the main Pokémon games. When a Pokémon is successfully captured using the Styler, the Styler will gain experience points, and a certain number of experience points will cause the Styler to level up. However, each Pokémon of the same species will yield exactly the same amount of experience points, as there is no concept of level in the Ranger games.

In Shadows of Almia, certain bonuses can be applied to the experience points gained under certain conditions, such as if the capture was made using only one line, or multiple Pokémon were captured at once.

Trivia

  • The Pokémon with the highest base experience yield is Blissey, with a base yield of 608. The Pokémon with the lowest base experience yield are Snivy, Tepig, and Oshawott, with a base yield of 28.
  • The highest possible amount of experience points that can be gained in a Single Battle is 457,970. This can be done by defeating a level 100 Blissey in a Trainer battle, using an internationally traded Pokémon at level 1 that is holding a Lucky Egg, with Exp. Point Power ↑↑↑, S or MAX active. This means that given these conditions, a Pokémon could technically advance from level 1 all the way to level 87 in a Single Battle, provided that it was in the Erratic experience group.
    • A Pokémon in the Fast experience group would advance to level 83.
    • A Pokémon in the Medium Fast experience group would advance to level 77.
    • A Pokémon in the Medium Slow experience group would advance to level 76.
    • A Pokémon in the Slow experience group would advance to level 71.
    • A Pokémon in the Fluctuating experience group would advance to level 69.
    • Before Generation V, the highest number of experience points it was possible to gain was 13,933. This could be done by defeating a level 100 Arceus, Happiny, Chansey, or Blissey in a Trainer battle, using an internationally traded Pokémon that is holding a Lucky Egg. This means that the most levels that a Pokémon could advance in a Single Battle is 25, if a level 1 Pokémon in the Medium Slow experience group defeated the level 100 Pokémon as mentioned above.
  • The lowest possible number of experience points for a single Pokémon to obtain in a Single Battle is one. This can be done by defeating a wild level 1 Patrat, Purrloin, or any other Pokémon with a base experience yield lower than 100, using a level 99 Pokémon.
    • Before Generation V, this could be done by defeating a wild level 1 Magikarp and splitting the experience points between three battling Pokémon.
  • The Medium Fast experience group is the only group not to have either the highest or the lowest total experience requirement at any level, being bounded by the Slow and Fast functions. The Medium Slow group is the only one to have both the highest and the lowest total experience requirement in at least one level before level 50.
  • There are no Generation V Pokémon in the Erratic or Fluctuating experience groups. Coincidentally, both groups were introduced in Generation III.
  • The Tao trio member the player has to catch—ReshiramB or ZekromW—does not yield experience points, even if it is knocked out at Dragonspiral Tower due to having a full party and boxes upon initial encounter.
  • In Generation V, it is impossible to gain more than 100,000 experience from any single Pokémon.
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