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Difference between revisions of "Evolution"

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(Undo revision 1641418 by Mr. Guye (talk))
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[[File:Evotag.gif|frame|right|{{p|Ivysaur}} evolving into {{p|Venusaur}}, depicted in {{game|Black and White|s}}]]
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{{merge|Evolution}}
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'''Evolution''' in the [[Pokémon Trading Card Game]] is very similar in some aspects to [[evolution|its counterpart]] in the [[main series]]. However, it differs mostly in the fact that there are no different methods needed to evolve a Pokémon, but instead, all Pokémon evolve simply by placing the next stage on top of a Pokémon in play that it evolves into.
   
During the course of a Pokémon's development, under certain circumstances specific to that Pokémon's species, it may '''evolve''' (Japanese: '''{{tt|進化|しんか}}''' ''shinka'') into a different Pokémon. This change is not merely physical, however, as Pokémon of a higher evolutionary stage have different (and usually more powerful) [[base stats]] than their predecessors, may have different [[move]]s that can be learned, and sometimes change their [[type]]s, though usually at least one of the types of the previous form is preserved. Other statistics, such as [[nature]] and {{EV}}s, as well as {{shiny|alternate coloration}}, are preserved. It is similar to {{wp|metamorphosis}}.
+
Pokémon cannot be evolved on the first turn of the game or on the first turn they come into play. They also cannot be evolved if on the same turn they were previously evolved or devolved.
 
[[Professor Elm]] and [[Professor Rowan]] are the leading experts in Pokémon evolution. According to the latter's research, over 90% of all Pokémon are connected to at least one other through evolution. Rowan is currently investigating whether evolution is a form of maturity in Pokémon, and looking at the implications this process has on legendary Pokémon, which don't evolve.
 
 
==Evolution families==
 
An evolution family is a group of Pokémon who will all, if bred with {{p|Ditto}} or a Pokémon in the same [[egg group]], make a Pokémon egg that will hatch into the same Pokémon, excluding baby Pokémon. This also means that the most basic form has the potential to become any of the rest of the family, although it will ultimately be able to follow only one evolutionary path.
 
 
===Stages of evolution===
 
Pokémon can be divided into different evolutionary stages, based on where they appear in their evolution family. All Pokémon fall into one of four groups: [[baby Pokémon]], unevolved Pokémon, first-evolution Pokémon, and second-evolution Pokémon. These groups are also the basis for the {{Trading Card Game}}'s grouping of {{TCG|Baby Pokémon}}, {{TCG|Basic Pokémon}}, {{TCG|Stage 1 Pokémon}}, and {{TCG|Stage 2 Pokémon}}, respectively.
 
 
Due to the fact that no evolution family contains both a baby Pokémon and a second-evolution Pokémon, many regard baby Pokémon as the most basic form, while moving their evolved counterparts one level higher. For example, originally, {{p|Pikachu}} was regarded as an unevolved Pokémon, however, with the release of {{p|Pichu}} in [[Generation II]], many now consider it to be more on par with Pokémon like {{p|Charmeleon}}, though its TCG classification remains the same.
 
 
====Two-evolution families====
 
{{main|:category:Pokémon that are part of a three-stage evolutionary line|Pokémon that are part of a three-stage evolutionary line}}
 
Perhaps the most well-known types of evolution families are those that feature two separate evolutionary events in the Pokémon's development. Indeed, this type of evolution family is what all of the [[starter Pokémon]] in the [[main series]] are a part of (excluding the starter {{p|Pikachu}} in {{game|Yellow}}, as {{p|Pichu}} did not yet exist and it could not be evolved into {{p|Raichu}}), as well as all [[pseudo-legendary Pokémon]]. An example of this type of evolution family is below.
 
 
{| align="center" style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|
 
{| align="center" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|- align="center"
 
| rowspan="2" |
 
| <small>Lowest</small>
 
| rowspan="2" | <small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Level|Level 30}}
 
| <small>Middle</small>
 
| rowspan="2" | <small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Level|Level 55}}
 
| <small>Highest</small>
 
| rowspan="2" |
 
|- text align="center"
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:147.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Dratini (Pokémon)|Dratini}}
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:148.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Dragonair (Pokémon)|Dragonair}}
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:149.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Dragonite (Pokémon)|Dragonite}}
 
|-
 
| colspan="5" |
 
|}
 
|}
 
 
====One-evolution families====
 
{{main|:category:Pokémon that are part of a two-stage evolutionary line|Pokémon that are part of a two-stage evolutionary line}}
 
By far the most common type of evolution family, these families are based in a Pokémon that will only ever evolve once in its development. About one third of all Pokémon that would later get a baby form were part of this kind of evolution family before their baby form was revealed. An example of this type of evolution family is below.
 
 
{| align="center" style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|
 
{| align="center" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|- align="center"
 
| rowspan="2" |
 
| <small>Lowest</small>
 
| rowspan="2" | <small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Level|Level 20}}
 
| <small>Highest</small>
 
| rowspan="2" |
 
|- text align="center"
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:019.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Rattata (Pokémon)|Rattata}}
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:020.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Raticate (Pokémon)|Raticate}}
 
|-
 
| colspan="3" |
 
|}
 
|}
 
 
====Pokémon that do not evolve====
 
{{main|List of Pokémon that are not part of an evolutionary line}}
 
The least common type of evolution family, of course, is that in which no evolutionary event takes place, meaning that it is made up of only one member. Many of the Pokémon that have no evolutionary relatives are, of course, [[legendary Pokémon]]. However, there are still 56 other Pokémon that do not evolve. Below is a list of all non-legendary Pokémon that do not evolve.
 
 
{| align="center" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundy|10px}}; border: 5px solid #E0F2B6"
 
|-
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundytl|5px}}" | [[Generation I|Gen I]]
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673;" | [[Generation II|Gen II]]
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673;" | [[Generation III|Gen III]]
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673;" | [[Generation IV|Gen IV]]
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundytr|5px}}" | [[Generation V|Gen V]]
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|083|Farfetch'd}}
 
| {{p|Farfetch'd}}
 
| {{MSP|201|Unown}}
 
| {{p|Unown}}
 
| {{MSP|302|Sableye}}
 
| {{p|Sableye}}
 
| {{MSP|417|Pachirisu}}
 
| {{p|Pachirisu}}
 
| {{MSP|531|Audino}}
 
| {{p|Audino}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|115|Kangaskhan}}
 
| {{p|Kangaskhan}}
 
| {{MSP|203|Girafarig}}
 
| {{p|Girafarig}}
 
| {{MSP|303|Mawile}}
 
| {{p|Mawile}}
 
| {{MSP|441|Chatot}}
 
| {{p|Chatot}}
 
| {{MSP|538|Throh}}
 
| {{p|Throh}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|127|Pinsir}}
 
| {{p|Pinsir}}
 
| {{MSP|206|Dunsparce}}
 
| {{p|Dunsparce}}
 
| {{MSP|311|Plusle}}
 
| {{p|Plusle}}
 
| {{MSP|442|Spiritomb}}
 
| {{p|Spiritomb}}
 
| {{MSP|539|Sawk}}
 
| {{p|Sawk}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|128|Tauros}}
 
| {{p|Tauros}}
 
| {{MSP|211|Qwilfish}}
 
| {{p|Qwilfish}}
 
| {{MSP|312|Minun}}
 
| {{p|Minun}}
 
| {{MSP|455|Carnivine}}
 
| {{p|Carnivine}}
 
| {{MSP|550|Basculin}}
 
| {{p|Basculin}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|131|Lapras}}
 
| {{p|Lapras}}
 
| {{MSP|213|Shuckle}}
 
| {{p|Shuckle}}
 
| {{MSP|313|Volbeat}}
 
| {{p|Volbeat}}
 
| {{MSP|479|Rotom}}
 
| {{p|Rotom}}
 
| {{MSP|556|Maractus}}
 
| {{p|Maractus}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|132|Ditto}}
 
| {{p|Ditto}}
 
| {{MSP|214|Heracross}}
 
| {{p|Heracross}}
 
| {{MSP|314|Illumise}}
 
| {{p|Illumise}}
 
| style="background: #C4E673" |
 
| style="background: #C4E673" |
 
| {{MSP|561|Sigilyph}}
 
| {{p|Sigilyph}}
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|142|Aerodactyl}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Aerodactyl}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|222|Corsola}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Corsola}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|324|Torkoal}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Torkoal}}
 
| colspan="2" rowspan="13" style="background: #C4E673" | &nbsp;
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|587|Emolga}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Emolga}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| colspan="2" rowspan="11" style="background: #C4E673" | &nbsp;
 
| {{MSP|225|Delibird}}
 
| {{p|Delibird}}
 
| {{MSP|327|Spinda}}
 
| {{p|Spinda}}
 
| {{MSP|594|Alomomola}}
 
| {{p|Alomomola}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|227|Skarmory}}
 
| {{p|Skarmory}}
 
| {{MSP|335|Zangoose}}
 
| {{p|Zangoose}}
 
| {{MSP|615|Cryogonal}}
 
| {{p|Cryogonal}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|234|Stantler}}
 
| {{p|Stantler}}
 
| {{MSP|336|Seviper}}
 
| {{p|Seviper}}
 
| {{MSP|618|Stunfisk}}
 
| {{p|Stunfisk}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|235|Smeargle}}
 
| {{p|Smeargle}}
 
| {{MSP|337|Lunatone}}
 
| {{p|Lunatone}}
 
| {{MSP|621|Druddigon}}
 
| {{p|Druddigon}}
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|241|Miltank}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Miltank}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|338|Solrock}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Solrock}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|626|Bouffalant}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Bouffalant}}
 
|- align="center"
 
| colspan="2" rowspan="6" style="background: #C4E673" | &nbsp;
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|351|Castform}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Castform}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|631|Heatmor}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{p|Heatmor}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|352|Kecleon}}
 
| {{p|Kecleon}}
 
| {{MSP|632|Durant}}
 
| {{p|Durant}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|357|Tropius}}
 
| {{p|Tropius}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|359|Absol}}
 
| {{p|Absol}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|369|Relicanth}}
 
| {{p|Relicanth}}
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|370|Luvdisc}}
 
| {{p|Luvdisc}}
 
|}
 
 
Not belonging to an evolutionary family is not indicative of strength, or a lack thereof. Some Pokémon, such as {{p|Pinsir}} and {{p|Skarmory}}, are comparable to fully evolved Pokémon while others, like {{p|Luvdisc}} and {{p|Pachirisu}}, are more comparable to unevolved Pokémon. Often this indicates a Pokémon's possibility to be eligible for future [[List of Pokémon with cross-generational evolutions|new evolutions]] or [[baby Pokémon|pre-evolutions]].
 
 
====Branch evolution families====
 
{{main|List of Pokémon with branched evolutions}}
 
Several families, while also one- and two-evolution families, are also branch evolution families. What this means is that there is a split in the evolutionary line at some point so that even though two Pokémon of the same species evolve the same amount of times, they can become one of two or more entirely different creatures. {{p|Eevee}} is the best-known example of this, evolving seven different ways depending on the method used. An example of this type of evolution family is below.
 
 
{| align="center" style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|
 
{| align="center" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundy|15px}}"
 
|- align="center"
 
| rowspan="3" |
 
| <small>Lowest</small>
 
| rowspan="3" | <small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Level|Level 25}}
 
| <small>Middle</small>
 
| rowspan="3" | <small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Evolutionary stone#Water Stone|Water Stone}}<br><br><br><small>Trigger</small><br>&rarr;<br>{{color2|000|Evolution-inducing held item#King's Rock|King's Rock}}
 
| <small>Highest</small>
 
| rowspan="3" |
 
|- text align="center"
 
| rowspan="2" style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:060.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Poliwag (Pokémon)|Poliwag}}
 
| rowspan="2" style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:061.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Poliwhirl (Pokémon)|Poliwhirl}}
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:062.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Poliwrath (Pokémon)|Poliwrath}}
 
|- text align="center"
 
| style="background: #E0F2B6; {{roundy|1em}}" | [[File:186.png]]<br>{{color2|000|Politoed (Pokémon)|Politoed}}
 
|-
 
| colspan="5" |
 
|}
 
|}
 
 
=====Advantages=====
 
A major difference between the final forms of an evolution family with a branch in evolution is in the way that their [[base stats]] line up. For example, {{p|Kirlia}} evolves into both {{p|Gardevoir}} and {{p|Gallade}}, which both have 518 total base stats. However, Gallade's base stat in {{stat|Attack}} is 125 and its base stat in {{stat|Special Attack}} is 65. The reverse is true for Gardevoir, whose Special Attack is 125 and whose Attack is 65. This is true of many opposing evolutions, with one focusing in one specific stat, the other focusing in a separate stat, and both having the same total stats. This is especially obvious in the [[Eeveelution]]s, who each have exactly the same base stats, though organized differently.
 
 
A listing of the stat focuses is below.
 
 
{| align="center" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundy|10px}}; border: 5px solid #E0F2B6"
 
|-
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673; {{roundytl|5px}}" | Basic form
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673;" | Evolutions
 
! colspan="2" style="background: #C4E673;" | Types
 
! style="background: #C4E673; {{roundytr|5px}}" | Difference
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|043|Oddish}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Oddish}}
 
| {{MSP|045|Vileplume}}
 
| {{p|Vileplume}}
 
| style="background:#{{grass color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Grass (type)|Grass}}
 
| style="background:#{{poison color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Poison (type)|Poison}}
 
| Special Attack is 100, Special Defense is 90
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|182|Bellossom}}
 
| {{p|Bellossom}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{grass color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Grass (type)|Grass}}
 
| Special Defense is 100, Special Attack is 90
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|060|Poliwag}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Poliwag}}
 
| {{MSP|062|Poliwrath}}
 
| {{p|Poliwrath}}
 
| style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| style="background:#{{fighting color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fighting (type)|Fighting}}
 
| Defense is 20 higher, Attack is 10 higher
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|186|Politoed}}
 
| {{p|Politoed}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| Special Attack is 20 higher, Special Defense is 10 higher
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|079|Slowpoke}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Slowpoke}}
 
| {{MSP|080|Slowbro}}
 
| {{p|Slowbro}}
 
| style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| style="background:#{{psychic color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Psychic (type)|Psychic}}
 
| Defense is 110, Special Defense is 80
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|199|Slowking}}
 
| {{p|Slowking}}
 
| style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| style="background:#{{psychic color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Psychic (type)|Psychic}}
 
| Special Defense is 110, Defense is 80
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="7" | {{MSP|133|Eevee}}
 
| rowspan="7" | {{p|Eevee}}
 
| {{MSP|134|Vaporeon}}
 
| {{p|Vaporeon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| Highest stat is HP
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|135|Jolteon}}
 
| {{p|Jolteon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{electric color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Electric (type)|Electric}}
 
| Highest stat is Speed
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|136|Flareon}}
 
| {{p|Flareon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{fire color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fire (type)|Fire}}
 
| Highest stat is Attack
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|196|Espeon}}
 
| {{p|Espeon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{psychic color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Psychic (type)|Psychic}}
 
| Highest stat is Special Attack
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|197|Umbreon}}
 
| {{p|Umbreon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{dark color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Dark (type)|Dark}}
 
| Highest stat is Special Defense
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|470|Leafeon}}
 
| {{p|Leafeon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{grass color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Grass (type)|Grass}}
 
| Highest stat is Defense
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|471|Glaceon}}
 
| {{p|Glaceon}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{ice color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Ice (type)|Ice}}
 
| Highest stat is Special Attack
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="3" | {{MSP|236|Tyrogue}}
 
| rowspan="3" | {{p|Tyrogue}}
 
| {{MSP|106|Hitmonlee}}
 
| {{p|Hitmonlee}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{fighting color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fighting (type)|Fighting}}
 
| Large difference between Attack and Defense
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|107|Hitmonchan}}
 
| {{p|Hitmonchan}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{fighting color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fighting (type)|Fighting}}
 
| Speed lower than Defense, Attack and Defense more equal
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|237|Hitmontop}}
 
| {{p|Hitmontop}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{fighting color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fighting (type)|Fighting}}
 
| Attack and Defense equal, Speed at minimum
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|265|Wurmple}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Wurmple}}
 
| {{MSP|267|Beautifly}}
 
| {{p|Beautifly}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{flying color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Flying (type)|Flying}}
 
| Attack and Special Attack higher than Defense and Special Defense
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|269|Dustox}}
 
| {{p|Dustox}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{poison color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Poison (type)|Poison}}
 
| Defense and Special Defense higher than Attack and Special Attack
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|280|Ralts}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Ralts}}
 
| {{MSP|282|Gardevoir}}
 
| {{p|Gardevoir}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{psychic color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Psychic (type)|Psychic}}
 
| Special Attack is 125, Attack is 65
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|475|Gallade}}
 
| {{p|Gallade}}
 
| style="background:#{{psychic color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Psychic (type)|Psychic}}
 
| style="background:#{{fighting color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Fighting (type)|Fighting}}
 
| Attack is 125, Special Attack is 65
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|361|Snorunt}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Snorunt}}
 
| {{MSP|362|Glalie}}
 
| {{p|Glalie}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{ice color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Ice (type)|Ice}}
 
| All stats are 80
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|478|Froslass}}
 
| {{p|Froslass}}
 
| style="background:#{{ice color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Ice (type)|Ice}}
 
| style="background:#{{ghost color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Ghost (type)|Ghost}}
 
| HP, Defense, Special Defense each 10 lower, Speed 30 higher
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| rowspan="2" | {{MSP|366|Clamperl}}
 
| rowspan="2" | {{p|Clamperl}}
 
| {{MSP|367|Huntail}}
 
| {{p|Huntail}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| Attack is 104, Special Attack is 94
 
|- align="center" style="background: #fff"
 
| {{MSP|368|Gorebyss}}
 
| {{p|Gorebyss}}
 
| colspan="2" style="background:#{{water color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Water (type)|Water}}
 
| Attack is 84, Special Attack is 114
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background:#fff; {{roundybl|5px}}" rowspan="4" | {{MSP|412|Burmy}}<br>{{MSP|412G|Burmy}}<br>{{MSP|412S|Burmy}}
 
| style="background: #fff" rowspan="4" | {{p|Burmy}}
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|413|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|{{p|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{grass color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Grass (type)|Grass}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|Special Attack and Special Defense higher by 10
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background: #fff" | {{MSP|413G|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|{{p|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{ground color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Ground (type)|Ground}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|Attack and Defense higher by 10
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background: #fff"|{{MSP|413S|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|{{p|Wormadam}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{steel color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Steel (type)|Steel}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|Equal special and physical stats
 
|- align="center"
 
| style="background:#fff; " | {{MSP|414|Mothim}}
 
| style="background: #fff"|{{p|Mothim}}
 
| style="background:#{{bug color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Bug (type)|Bug}}
 
| style="background:#{{flying color}}" | {{color2|FFF|Flying (type)|Flying}}
 
| style="background:#fff; {{roundybr|5px}}" | Lower Defenses but higher HP, Attacks, and Speed
 
|}
 
 
==Methods of evolution==
 
{{main|Methods of evolution}}
 
The various triggers for a Pokémon's evolution are almost as varied as the Pokémon themselves, and some Pokémon have a unique evolution method. The most common of them is evolution by leveling up at or above a certain level. Other methods include the following:
 
*leveling up when [[happiness]] has reached {{tt|a high level|a happiness of 220 or greater}}
 
*leveling up while holding an item
 
*leveling up while knowing a certain move
 
*leveling up in a certain location
 
*[[trade|trading]] the Pokémon
 
*trading the Pokémon while [[evolution-inducing held item|holding an item]]
 
*using an [[evolutionary stone]] on it.
 
 
Additionally, holding an {{evostone|Everstone}} prevents a Pokémon from evolving.
 
 
Pokémon that can evolve into more than one Pokémon will usually have the ways in which the evolution is activated being slightly similar, such as having both be by [[evolutionary stone]] or by [[held item|holding an item]] and [[trade|trading]]. Closely-related Pokémon, such as {{p|Nidoran♀}} and {{p|Nidoran♂}}, will also have very similar, if not identical, evolution methods.
 
 
Some Pokémon have different evolutions depending on their gender. For example, only female {{p|Combee}} can evolve into {{p|Vespiquen}}; male Combee cannot evolve at all. Meanwhile, {{p|Snorunt}} can evolve into {{p|Glalie}}, but females ones have the option of evolving into {{p|Froslass}} instead. This instance occurs in a similar way with {{p|Kirlia}}.
 
 
Also, there have been situations in which the current party must be configured in a specific manner for some Pokémon to evolve. So far, only two Pokémon need to have these special requirements. One is {{p|Mantyke}}, which will evolve into {{p|Mantine}} if leveled up with a {{p|Remoraid}} in the player's party. The other is {{p|Nincada}}, and will evolve into {{p|Ninjask}} when it reaches level 20. However, if there happens to be an empty space in the player's party (and a spare [[Poké Ball]] in Generations IV and V), a {{p|Shedinja}} will also appear in the party.
 
 
In [[Generation V]], a new method of evolution was introduced: the method of trading two specific Pokémon with each other. If one trades a {{p|Karrablast}} for a {{p|Shelmet}}, they will evolve into {{p|Escavalier}} and {{p|Accelgor}}, respectively. Neither will evolve if one of them holds an {{evostone|Everstone}} though.
 
 
==In the anime==
 
[[File:Evolution anime.png|thumb|{{p|Slowpoke}} and {{p|Shellder}} evolving into {{p|Slowking}} in the anime]]
 
[[File:Kakuna evolution anime.png|thumb|200px|left|{{p|Kakuna}} evolving into {{p|Beedrill}} in ''[[EP004|Challenge of the Samurai]]'']]
 
[[File:Evolution anime Best Wishes.gif|thumb|Evolution in the anime, as of the [[Best Wishes series]]]]
 
In the anime, evolution happens in much the same way as it does in the games; though [[level]]-based evolutions and [[trade]]-based evolutions do not occur using those methods, there are similarities in the way they come about. For example, {{an|Misty}}'s {{p|Poliwhirl}} evolved into {{TP|Misty|Politoed}} because it found {{Ash}}'s {{DL|Evolution-inducing held item|King's Rock}} and was holding it when Misty sent it out, while in the games it is required that Poliwhirl be traded while holding the King's Rock for the evolution to take place (It should be noted that Poliwhirl had been through a machine in connection with it being healed at the Pokémon Center, while holding the item). When a {{p|Beedrill}} attacked Ash's {{p|Metapod}}, it caused a crack to appear on its shell, which {{AP|Butterfree}} came out of.
 
 
Additionally, a difference can be seen in the fact that Pokémon evolve ''during'' a battle, as opposed to after it. Pokémon may also evolve when they are needed to, for an extra boost of power, instead of after a set amount of training, such as when Ash's {{p|Charmeleon}} evolved into {{AP|Charizard}}. In addition, Pokémon can sometimes choose not to evolve, even if they evolve by a 'natural' method such as leveling up. It appears that evolution has emotional implications for Pokémon - some Pokémon, such as Team Rocket's {{MTR}}, dislike their evolved forms, while others such as Ash's {{AP|Pikachu}} simply want to prove they can be powerful without evolving. Conversely, when Pokémon do evolve, this can often be linked with an experience that causes them to mature emotionally or deal with an emotional issue, such as when the {{p|Poochyena}} in ''[[AG011|A Bite to Remember]]'' evolved, or the {{p|Paras}} in ''[[EP044|The Problem With Paras]]''. Poochyena, for some reason, had an aversion to using the move {{m|Bite}}, while Paras was extremely timid and weak in battle. Both of them evolved shortly after overcoming these issues.
 
 
For a list of all evolutions that Pokémon belonging to the main cast have undergone, see [[List of anime Pokémon by evolution]].
 
 
==In the TCG==
 
{{main|Evolution (TCG)}}
 
Evolution in the TCG functions similarly in many aspects to that of the games, however, there is no different requirement that needs to be met depending on the Pokémon species to be evolved to move on to the next stage.
 
   
  +
==Stages of evolution==
 
There are four different stages of evolution in the TCG, Baby Pokémon, Basic Pokémon, Stage 1 Pokémon, and Stage 2 Pokémon. Of these, only Baby and Basic Pokémon may be placed onto the Bench during the setup phase and during play; Stage 1 and Stage 2 Pokémon are considered to be evolution cards and therefore unable to be played except on top of their corresponding pre-evolved forms. The stage of evolution is indicated in a conspicuous place on each and every Pokémon card, though the placement differs among the four generations of cards.
 
There are four different stages of evolution in the TCG, Baby Pokémon, Basic Pokémon, Stage 1 Pokémon, and Stage 2 Pokémon. Of these, only Baby and Basic Pokémon may be placed onto the Bench during the setup phase and during play; Stage 1 and Stage 2 Pokémon are considered to be evolution cards and therefore unable to be played except on top of their corresponding pre-evolved forms. The stage of evolution is indicated in a conspicuous place on each and every Pokémon card, though the placement differs among the four generations of cards.
   
 
Within the deck and discard pile, only Stage 1 and Stage 2 cards are considered to be "evolution cards" for the purpose of a Trainer card or Pokémon Power which allows them to be searched for. In play, a Basic Pokémon card can be considered an evolution card if it is evolved from its Baby stage.
 
Within the deck and discard pile, only Stage 1 and Stage 2 cards are considered to be "evolution cards" for the purpose of a Trainer card or Pokémon Power which allows them to be searched for. In play, a Basic Pokémon card can be considered an evolution card if it is evolved from its Baby stage.
   
==In relation to the real world==
+
===Baby Pokémon===
Evolution in Pokémon, for most species, is more akin to {{wp|metamorphosis}} than to {{wp|evolution|actual evolution}}. This is because real life evolution happens to a population rather than to individuals, and happens over much larger time scales than in the Pokémon world. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, it is mentioned that Pokémon evolution is an entirely separate phenomenon from the normal process of evolution, and is a mysterious ability exclusive to Pokémon that is still not fully understood.
+
A Baby Pokémon is much the same in the TCG as it is in the main series of games. In fact, as with baby Pokémon released beyond [[Generation II]], it is not even necessary for a Pokémon to even go through this stage of their evolutionary line, as the Pokémon can just start from their basic form. Baby Pokémon are among the weakest in the TCG, most often having 30 HP, as well as one of two special {{TCG|Ability|Abilities}}; one prevents all damage done to the Baby Pokémon while it is Asleep (Baby Pokémon with this Ability also usually have an attack that changes their status to Asleep), and the other forces a Pokémon attempting to attack the Baby Pokémon to flip a coin, the attack doing nothing if that coin ends up tails.
  +
  +
===Basic Pokémon===
  +
A Basic Pokémon is the most basic of Pokémon cards, as can be deduced from its name. Commonly basic Pokémon will have low HP, a common rarity, and low damage and {{TCG|Energy card|Energy}} costs. These cards can be placed directly into play without another Pokémon card needing to be in play first. Pokémon that evolve from a Pokémon released in a later generation, such as {{p|Electabuzz}} or {{p|Pikachu}}, always are basic Pokémon, despite being the second Pokémon in their own evolutionary lines. Baby Pokémon, {{TCG|Shining Pokémon}} and {{TCG|Pokémon ☆|Pokémon}} {{Star}} are always Basic, the latter two cannot evolve.
   
However, this does not necessarily mean that evolution in real-world terms does not exist in the Pokémon world; the existence of "extinct" Pokémon backs this up, or also in the alternately colored Pokémon of the Orange Archipelago; {{p|Magikarp}} is apparently much weaker than its prehistoric ancestors, showing a genetic change in the Magikarp population.
+
===Stage 1 Pokémon===
  +
A Stage 1 Pokémon are the first kind of evolution card, being able to be evolved from a Basic Pokémon. Stage 1 cards are most commonly uncommon in rarity. Stage 1 Pokémon are also able to be {{TCG|Dark Pokémon}} and {{TCG|Light Pokémon}}.
   
==Trivia==
+
===Stage 2 Pokémon===
*{{p|Eevee}} and {{p|Feebas}} are the only two Pokémon that reach their next evolutionary forms in multiple ways. Whereas in the handheld games, Eevee becomes {{p|Espeon}} or {{p|Umbreon}} with high [[happiness]] when leveled up depending on the [[time]] of day. In {{Pokémon XD}} it evolves when raised a level when the [[Sun Shard]] or [[Moon Shard]] is in the [[bag]]. This is because Pokémon XD, like {{g|Colosseum}} and {{game|FireRed and LeafGreen|s}}, lacks a time function. Feebas, meanwhile, evolves into {{p|Milotic}} when its [[Beauty Contest|Beauty condition]] is high, which cannot be done in the [[Generation V]] games unless the Feebas is native to a [[Generation III]] or {{gen|IV}} game and has had its Beauty raised to maximum prior to use of [[Poké Transfer]] to send it forward from Generation IV's games. Due to this, the [[Prism Scale]] was introduced, so that Feebas caught in the wild or bred in [[Unova]] would be able to evolve freely.
+
A Stage 2 Pokémon is the highest of evolution cards, commonly rare or holographic in rarity, and can only, in normal conditions, be evolved from a Stage 1 Pokémon. Stage 2 Pokémon are also able to be {{TCG|Dark Pokémon}} and {{TCG|Light Pokémon}}.
   
==See also==
+
==Ability to evolve==
* [[List of Pokémon by evolution family]]
+
A Pokémon card that is in the player's hand must say specifically that it evolves from a Pokémon card that is in play on the player's side. For example, {{TCG ID|Team Rocket|Dark Blastoise|3}} states on the card "'''Evolves from Dark Wartortle'''". This means that any card named Dark Wartortle may be evolved into Dark Blastoise. However, a card simply named Wartortle cannot. Likewise, Pokémon such as {{TCG ID|EX Emerald|Rhyhorn|62}} cannot be evolved into a Pokémon that says on it "'''Evolves from Team Magma's Rhyhorn'''".
* [[List of Pokémon with cross-generational evolutions]]
 
* [[Form differences]]
 
{{training}}<br>
 
{{Project Games notice|game mechanic}}
 
   
[[Category:Pokémon world]]
+
However, Pokémon cards from different sets may evolve into one another. For example, {{TCG ID|Neo Destiny|Dark Crobat|2}} can evolve from either {{TCG ID|Team Rocket|Dark Golbat|7}} of the {{TCG|Team Rocket}} set or {{TCG ID|EX Team Rocket Returns|Dark Golbat|34}} of the {{TCG|EX Team Rocket Returns}} set. So long as the card names match precisely both TO (here Dark Crobat) and FROM (here Dark Golbat), the evolution is legal. This rule, of course, can be circumvented by certain means, such as {{TCG|Pokémon Power}}s and {{TCG|Trainer card}}s, however, this is not common.
[[Category:Terminology]]
 
[[Category:Game mechanics]]
 
   
[[pt:Evolução]]
+
{{Project TCG notice}}
   
[[de:Entwicklung]]
+
[[Category:TCG]]
[[fr:Évolution]]
 
[[it:Evoluzione]]
 
[[ja:進化]]
 
[[pl:Ewolucja]]
 

Revision as of 22:16, 20 April 2012

082Magneton.png The contents of this article have been suggested to be merged into the page
Evolution.

Please discuss it on the talk page for this article.

Evolution in the Pokémon Trading Card Game is very similar in some aspects to its counterpart in the main series. However, it differs mostly in the fact that there are no different methods needed to evolve a Pokémon, but instead, all Pokémon evolve simply by placing the next stage on top of a Pokémon in play that it evolves into.

Pokémon cannot be evolved on the first turn of the game or on the first turn they come into play. They also cannot be evolved if on the same turn they were previously evolved or devolved.

Stages of evolution

There are four different stages of evolution in the TCG, Baby Pokémon, Basic Pokémon, Stage 1 Pokémon, and Stage 2 Pokémon. Of these, only Baby and Basic Pokémon may be placed onto the Bench during the setup phase and during play; Stage 1 and Stage 2 Pokémon are considered to be evolution cards and therefore unable to be played except on top of their corresponding pre-evolved forms. The stage of evolution is indicated in a conspicuous place on each and every Pokémon card, though the placement differs among the four generations of cards.

Within the deck and discard pile, only Stage 1 and Stage 2 cards are considered to be "evolution cards" for the purpose of a Trainer card or Pokémon Power which allows them to be searched for. In play, a Basic Pokémon card can be considered an evolution card if it is evolved from its Baby stage.

Baby Pokémon

A Baby Pokémon is much the same in the TCG as it is in the main series of games. In fact, as with baby Pokémon released beyond Generation II, it is not even necessary for a Pokémon to even go through this stage of their evolutionary line, as the Pokémon can just start from their basic form. Baby Pokémon are among the weakest in the TCG, most often having 30 HP, as well as one of two special Abilities; one prevents all damage done to the Baby Pokémon while it is Asleep (Baby Pokémon with this Ability also usually have an attack that changes their status to Asleep), and the other forces a Pokémon attempting to attack the Baby Pokémon to flip a coin, the attack doing nothing if that coin ends up tails.

Basic Pokémon

A Basic Pokémon is the most basic of Pokémon cards, as can be deduced from its name. Commonly basic Pokémon will have low HP, a common rarity, and low damage and Energy costs. These cards can be placed directly into play without another Pokémon card needing to be in play first. Pokémon that evolve from a Pokémon released in a later generation, such as Electabuzz or Pikachu, always are basic Pokémon, despite being the second Pokémon in their own evolutionary lines. Baby Pokémon, Shining Pokémon and Pokémon Star are always Basic, the latter two cannot evolve.

Stage 1 Pokémon

A Stage 1 Pokémon are the first kind of evolution card, being able to be evolved from a Basic Pokémon. Stage 1 cards are most commonly uncommon in rarity. Stage 1 Pokémon are also able to be Dark Pokémon and Light Pokémon.

Stage 2 Pokémon

A Stage 2 Pokémon is the highest of evolution cards, commonly rare or holographic in rarity, and can only, in normal conditions, be evolved from a Stage 1 Pokémon. Stage 2 Pokémon are also able to be Dark Pokémon and Light Pokémon.

Ability to evolve

A Pokémon card that is in the player's hand must say specifically that it evolves from a Pokémon card that is in play on the player's side. For example, Dark Blastoise states on the card "Evolves from Dark Wartortle". This means that any card named Dark Wartortle may be evolved into Dark Blastoise. However, a card simply named Wartortle cannot. Likewise, Pokémon such as Rhyhorn cannot be evolved into a Pokémon that says on it "Evolves from Team Magma's Rhyhorn".

However, Pokémon cards from different sets may evolve into one another. For example, Dark Crobat can evolve from either Dark Golbat of the Team Rocket set or Dark Golbat of the EX Team Rocket Returns set. So long as the card names match precisely both TO (here Dark Crobat) and FROM (here Dark Golbat), the evolution is legal. This rule, of course, can be circumvented by certain means, such as Pokémon Powers and Trainer cards, however, this is not common.


Project TCG logo.png This article is part of Project TCG, a Bulbapedia project that aims to report on every aspect of the Pokémon Trading Card Game.