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Difference between revisions of "Appendix:Metagame terminology"

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====Pseudo-passer====
 
====Pseudo-passer====
A moveset with {{m|Wish}}, {{m|Safeguard}}, {{m|Light Screen}} and/or {{m|Reflect}} in it. Reflect and Light Screen are countered by {{m|Brick Break}}.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to aid its allies directly through the use of [[status move]]s with beneficial effects (such as {{m|Wish}} or {{m|Reflect}}), but without using {{m|Baton Pass}}.
   
 
====RestoChesto====
 
====RestoChesto====
A Pokémon that knows {{m|Rest}} holding a [[Chesto Berry]] in order to immediately wake up after healing. Usually seen on [[#Tank|Tanks]] and [[#Wall|Walls]].
+
Refers to the move {{m|Rest}} and the [[held item]] [[Chesto Berry]] being present in a Pokémon set. It is amply featured in the games.
   
 
====Sashed====
 
====Sashed====
A Pokémon that is holding a [[Focus Sash]], usually a very frail one such as {{p|Dugtrio}} or {{p|Weavile}}, so it can survive a hit.
+
Refers to the [[held item]] [[Focus Sash]] being present in a Pokémon set.
   
 
====Shuffler====
 
====Shuffler====
A shuffler is a Pokémon with {{m|Whirlwind}}, {{m|Roar}}, {{m|Dragon Tail}}, or {{m|Circle Throw}} that forces the opponent's Pokémon to switch. They are often used as [[#Annoyer|annoyers]]. Usually used as a pseudo-hazer or in combination with entry hazards or status problems, or a combination of them.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using {{m|Roar}}, {{m|Whirlwind}}, {{m|Circle Throw}}, or {{m|Dragon Tail}}.
   
 
=====Phazer=====
 
=====Phazer=====
A phazer, or pseudo-hazer, is moveset with either {{m|Whirlwind}} or {{m|Roar}}, which is intended to force a stat-boosted Pokémon to switch out, thus removing its stat changes. A moveset with moves such as {{m|Yawn}}, {{m|Leech Seed}}, {{m|Perish Song}} or {{m|Charm}} can also be considered a Phazer; the effects of these moves are such that any sensible opponent will be forced switch out their Pokémon.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to eliminate an opponent's Pokémon's positive [[stat]] changes and/or other beneficial effects without using {{m|Haze}}. One approach is to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using {{m|Roar}}, {{m|Whirlwind}}, {{m|Circle Throw}}, or {{m|Dragon Tail}}. Another approach is to pressure the opponent to call back their Pokémon, by using [[status move]]s with disadvantageous effects that can be removed through switching (such as {{m|Leech Seed}}, {{m|Perish Song}}, or {{m|Yawn}}).
   
 
=====Status shuffler=====
 
=====Status shuffler=====
A status shuffler has a moveset with either {{m|Roar}} or {{m|Whirlwind}} and {{m|Toxic}} as well as {{m|Thunder Wave}} or {{m|Will-O-Wisp}}. Works by inflicting a status problem, then shuffling and repeating. They are usaully named based on the status problem they use: Parashufflers inflict {{status|paralysis}}, Pyroshufflers inflict {{status|burn}}, Toxishufflers inflict {{status|bad poison}}. Often used in tandem with a [[#Spiker|Spiker]] for best results. Countered by a [[#Cleric|Cleric]], or simply by attacking each time they try to PHaze.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to inflict [[status ailment]]s on multiple opposing Pokémon, and cause multiple switches from the opponent in order to achieve this end.
   
 
====Spinner====
 
====Spinner====
A spinner or Rapid Spinner is user of the move {{m|Rapid Spin}}, with the role of removing [[#Entry hazards|entry hazards]], thereby leaving the field clear for a [[#Sweeper|sweeper]]. Common spinners are {{p|Starmie}} and {{p|Tentacruel}}. The method for countering this technique is by having a Ghost-type Pokémon in play: Rapid Spin, as a Normal-type move, will have no effect in this case. Such a Pokémon is known as a [[#Spinblocker|spinblocker]].
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move {{m|Rapid Spin}}.
   
 
====Spiker====
 
====Spiker====
A moveset that includes the move {{m|Spikes}}. Since that is the only requirement, there are many variations to Spiker movesets. Effective ones utilize [[#Shuffler|shuffling moves]], {{m|Toxic Spikes}}, {{m|Stealth Rock}}, and/or {{m|Rapid Spin}}.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move {{m|Spikes}}.
   
 
====Staller====
 
====Staller====
Much like the [[#Tank|tank]], this moveset lives to build up passive damage (such as {{status|Poison}}, {{status|Burn}}, {{m|Leech Seed}}, and [[Weather|weather conditions]]) while stalling with {{m|Protect}}, recovery moves or (rarely) with {{m|Fly}}, {{m|Dive}} or {{m|Dig}}. {{m|Toxic}} is most commonly used due to its increasing amount of damage caused. Some counters include a [[#Cleric|Cleric]], the move {{m|Taunt}} and {{p|Clefable}} (due to the ability {{a|Magic Guard}}).
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force a standstill in order to enjoy its advantages, which may include recurring effect damage to opposing Pokémon (such as from certain [[status ailment]]s or [[Weather|weather conditions]]). This may be achieved through the use of [[move]]s/[[held item]]s/[[Ability|Abilities]] that restore {{stat|HP}} and/or moves like {{m|Protect}}, usually combined with stats and [[type]](s) that minimize the percentage of damage taken from damage-dealing moves. It is amply featured in the games.
   
 
====RestTalker====
 
====RestTalker====
A RestTalker, also known as a Sleep Talker or STalker, is a Pokémon with a moveset with {{m|Rest}} and {{m|Sleep Talk}}. It is used to maintain a Pokémon's health with Rest (usually with good defenses as well), but allow it to attack in the meantime with Sleep Talk. It's not a perfect strategy, as there is the chance Sleep Talk will call Rest again, but it works often enough to see use. {{p|Milotic}} is an excellent example of a RestTalker due to {{a|Marvel Scale}}. Though Milotic also has {{m|Recover}}, a RestTalker set is sometimes used because of its Ability {{a|Marvel Scale}}, although generally moves like Recover are used.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves {{m|Rest}} and {{m|Sleep Talk}}. It is amply featured in the games. Also referred to as a "Sleep Talker" or a "STalker".
   
 
====Revenge killer====
 
====Revenge killer====
Pokémon that can switch in after an opponent has knocked out another Pokémon (with the intent of swiftly knocking out the opponent), revenge killers are often equipped with [[#Priority moves|priority moves]] or a [[Choice Scarf]]. For example, {{p|Weavile}} makes an effective revenge killer due to its high {{stat|Attack}} stat and access to {{m|Ice Shard}}. Sometimes employed after 'sacrificing' a [[#Decoy|decoy]]. {{m|Retaliate}}'s effect makes it an excellent Revenge move.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon without preparation by timing the free switch-in that is granted when an ally is knocked out. Is typically tailored torwards getting to move first, by including one or more damage-dealing moves with increased [[priority]] and/or a comparatively high {{stat|Speed}} stat (achieved with or without the [[held item]] {{DL|In-battle effect item|Choice Scarf}}). This aspect of Pokémon battling is highlighted in the games in the form of the move {{m|Retaliate}}.
   
 
====Seeder====
 
====Seeder====
Seeders are Pokémon that use {{m|Leech Seed}} to force switches, drain HP to heal themselves, or wear down defensive Pokémon. They are often used with {{m|Substitute}} known as Subseeders. Subseeders are often fast Pokémon that repeatedly use substitute while the opponent is afflicted with leech seed. The healing of leech seed allows them to gain back the health they lost from substitute while the opponent's health is slowly worn down. Examples of Subseeders are {{p|Whimsicott}} and {{p|Sceptile}}.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move {{m|Leech Seed}}. A "Subseeder" refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves {{m|Substitute}} and Leech Seed.
   
 
====Spinblocker====
 
====Spinblocker====
A {{type|Ghost}} Pokémon that is used in order to stop the foe from using {{m|Rapid Spin}} (which doesn't affect Ghost-type Pokémon) to remove [[entry hazard]]s from its side of the field. Notable spinblockers are {{p|Froslass}} and {{p|Giratina}}.
+
Refers to a {{type|Ghost}} Pokémon that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from successfully using {{m|Rapid Spin}}.
   
 
====Sponge====
 
====Sponge====
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====Subpasser====
 
====Subpasser====
A moveset with {{m|Substitute}} and {{m|Baton Pass}}. Although any Pokémon that can learn Baton Pass can pass substitutes, Pokémon with high HP are preferred so that the Substitute passed will also have a high HP. Subpassing is beneficial as it allows for a Pokémon to have a substitute with a much higher HP than it could make itself. If such a substitute is passed to a [[#Wall|wall]] or [[#Tank|tank]], the opponent will have a hard time breaking the substitute right away, allowing the target to reap the benefits of the Substitute, such as immunity to status effects. Subpasses can also pass defensive boosts to make the substitutes even harder to break, but then that only leaves them one move for attacking, making them very vulnerable to Taunt.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to create a substitute by using {{m|Substitute}} and pass it on to an ally by using {{m|Baton Pass}}.
   
 
====Subpuncher====
 
====Subpuncher====
A moveset with {{m|Substitute}} and {{m|Focus Punch}} to avoid the flinch chance from Focus Punch. Works best with slower Pokémon as the Substitute may end up being broken the turn it's made if the subpuncher goes first. Slightly harder to use in Double Battles where the two Pokémon could gang up on the Subpuncher to break the Substitute and hit the Pokémon. Countered by Thick Club Marowak whose Bonemerang usually does enough damage to break the Substitute on the first hit, allowing the second hit to attack the subpuncher directly. It's also is countered by Technician Ambipom who might break the Substitute on the first hit of Double Hit.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves {{m|Substitute}} and {{m|Focus Punch}}. It is amply featured in the games.
 
[[Chuck]] has a {{p|Breloom}} which knows {{m|Substitute}} and {{m|Focus Punch}} in his {{2v2|HeartGold|SoulSilver}} [[rematch]] team.
 
   
 
====Sunnybeamer====
 
====Sunnybeamer====
A moveset with {{m|Sunny Day}} and {{m|SolarBeam}} to avoid the one turn charge up from SolarBeam. Often used on Pokémon with the {{a|Chlorophyll}} Ability, {{type|Fire}} Pokémon, or Pokémon with the moves {{m|Synthesis}}, {{m|Morning Sun}}, or {{m|Moonlight}}, for increased HP recovery.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use {{m|SolarBeam}} under {{DL|Weather conditions|intense sunlight}}.
   
 
====Sweeper====
 
====Sweeper====
A Pokémon included with the object of quickly knocking out, or "sweeping," an opponent's team. Sweepers specialize in primarily direct attacks, often with stat-boosting moves. Sweepers are characterized by high Speed and/or offensive stats, while often having poor defensive stats and HP. There are three types of sweeper: physical, special and mixed. Physical sweepers use physical moves, special sweepers use special moves, and mixed sweepers use both. Mixed sweepers can also be used as [[#Wall|wall]] breakers, which are Pokémon whose attacks are specifically chosen to take down common walls, like {{m|Close Combat}} for {{p|Blissey}} or {{m|Fire Blast}} for {{p|Skarmory}}. Common sweeper counters are bulky Pokémon with large defensive stats and [[priority]] moves.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon in succession, usually through the assistance of positive [[stat]] changes. Commonly branched into the categories physical sweeper, special sweeper, and mixed sweeper, depending on its stats and damage-dealing moves.
   
 
====Tank====
 
====Tank====
A Pokémon that can take hits and still fight back. Similar to a [[#Wall|wall]] in that it is often very difficult to defeat, a tank can still threaten the opponent offensively. Some common tanks are {{p|Bronzong}}, {{p|Musharna}} and {{p|Ferrothorn}}.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of {{stat|HP}} and {{stat|Defense}} and/or {{stat|Special Defense}}, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from [[physical move]]s or [[special move]]s or both, while at the same time posing a threat in the form of damage-dealing moves backed by a comparatively high {{stat|Attack}} or {{stat|Special Attack}} stat.
   
 
====Thunderdancer====
 
====Thunderdancer====
A moveset with {{m|Rain Dance}} and {{m|Thunder}} to give Thunder 100% accuracy. Pokémon with the {{a|Volt Absorb}} or {{a|Water Absorb}} [[Ability]] are preferred, due to their immunity to enemy {{m|Surf}}s and {{m|Thunder}}s.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves {{m|Thunder}} and {{m|Rain Dance}}.
   
 
====Trapper====
 
====Trapper====
A Pokémon designed to trap a Pokémon for one reason or another. Moves such as {{m|Mean Look}} and {{m|Spider Web}} are standard trapping moves but moves such as {{m|Wrap}} and {{m|Fire Spin}} are also used sometimes. May be used in tandem with {{m|Toxic}} or {{m|Curse}} ({{t|Ghost}} version) to sap the opponent's health or {{m|Perish Song}} for a guaranteed knockout. Certain Abilities, such as {{a|Shadow Tag}}, {{a|Magnet Pull}} and {{a|Arena Trap}}, trap automatically. The general idea is to make both switching out and staying in an undesirable option for the opponent.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from switching out, through the effects of various [[status move]]s, damage-dealing moves, or [[Ability|Abilities]], and take advantage of the situation.
   
 
====Wall====
 
====Wall====
A Pokémon with a very high defensive stat, a wall is used to block attacks of that kind (for example, a physical wall would block physical attacks). A good example would be {{p|Skarmory}} who is considered as a physical wall. Almost any Pokémon with a high enough Defense or Special Defense stat can be used as a wall.
+
Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of {{stat|HP}} and {{stat|Defense}} and/or {{stat|Special Defense}}, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from [[physical move]]s or [[special move]]s or both. Commonly branched into the categories physical wall, special wall, and mixed wall, depending on its stats.
   
 
===Specific sets===
 
===Specific sets===

Revision as of 18:13, 22 February 2013

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Contents

The Pokémon metagame has a wide range of fanmade terminology for various aspects of the games. These are colloquial terms originating from unofficial sources, and are not found within the games themselves.

General terms

Baton Pass chain

Refers to continuous use of the move Baton Pass and the accumulated stat changes.

Choice lock

Refers to how the held items Choice Band, Choice Scarf, and Choice Specs limit a Pokémon to use only one of its moves.

Clause

Clauses refer to the various rules that are applied to battles, such as restrictions on which Pokémon, moves, and items may be used. Many of these rules are found in the games, applied in settings such as battle facilities and multiplayer features.

Evasion clause

Refers to a ban on moves that raise evasion (such as Double Team). Does not necessarily put a ban on moves that reduce accuracy (such as Sand-Attack) or moves/Abilities that merely have a possibility of raising evasion (such as Acupressure/Moody).

Freeze clause

Refers to technical measures taken in order to prevent multiple Pokémon on the same team from being frozen solid at the same time. Found in games like Pokémon Stadium and battle simulators like Pokémon Online.

Item clause

Refers to a ban on multiple Pokémon of the same team holding the same item. Found in battle facilities and officially organized tournaments, but widely ignored in many large communities.

Level clause

Refers to measures taken to ensure that all Pokémon used by both Trainers are close to or at the same level—usually 50 or 100. Found in battle facilities and Wi-Fi features.

Sleep clause

Refers to a ban on the usage of sleep-inducing moves when one of the opponent's Pokémon has already been put to sleep by one of the user's Pokémon. As such, the move Rest and the Ability Effect Spore do not violate this ban. Found in Pokémon Battle Revolution.

Hax

Refers to outcomes that are perceived as unlikely to the point of being unfair. Common targets are critical hits, moves missing, the success of secondary effects, and full paralysis. Can also refer to reliance on uncertain outcomes, such as the use of one-hit knockout moves or held items like Quick Claw, Focus Band, or BrightPowder. Hax is, somewhat paradoxically, often associated with the Ability Serene Grace.

HP <type>

Refers to the move Hidden Power and its type (e.g. HP Ice, HP Fire).

IV battle

Refers to a battle held solely for the purpose of observing the stats of one or more Pokémon as they appear when set to a higher level for the duration of the battle, thus making it easier to estimate the Pokémon's individual values.

Mono team

Refers to a team with homogeneity in a certain area such as type, color, or generation.

Pinch Berry

Refers to the Liechi, Ganlon, Salac, Petaya, Apicot, Lansat, and Starf Berries, which all raise a stat when the holding Pokémon's HP drops below ¼ (referred to as being in a pinch in the games). The Micle and Custap Berries may also be considered Pinch Berries.

RNG

Main article: Pseudorandom number generation in Pokémon

Refers to the Random Number Generator, or rather the practice of manipulating it through the use of fan-made software, in order to obtain Shiny Pokémon or Pokémon with specific individual values—both endeavors which would otherwise leave a lot up to chance.

Spam

Refers to repeated use of the same move.

Standard rules

Refer to a set of widely employed rules for multiplayer battles. Includes species, sleep, and evasion clauses, as well as bans on hacks, one-hit knockout moves, and Pokémon in the (abided) Uber tier,

Type coverage

Refers to how the types of damage-dealing moves known by a Pokémon match up against all 17 types and their many combinations in terms of effectiveness.

Pokémon sets

Refer to Pokémon not only by species, but also by their stats, moves, Ability and held item.

Common roles

Within competitive battling there are a number of categories that are used to describe the intended role of a Pokémon set:

Annoyer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent the opponent from progressing with their strategy, commonly through the use of status moves and status ailments.

Anti-lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first.

Attack lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, intended to foil the Pokémon sets that are commonly sent out first, through the use of damage-dealing moves supported by a high Attack or Special Attack stat.

Baton Passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use the move Baton Pass in order to pass on positive stat changes and/or volatile battle statuses, which it may or may not have contributed to itself.

BoltBeam

Refers to the moves Thunderbolt and Ice Beam being present in a Pokémon set. "Pseudo BoltBeam" refers to a damage-dealing Electric-type move and a damage-dealing Ice-type move being present in a Pokémon set, when these aren't the exact combination of Thunderbolt and Ice Beam. BoltBeam is amply featured in the games.

Bulky

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both.

Choice user

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Band, Choice Scarf, or Choice Specs.

Choice Bander

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Band.

Scarf wearer

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Scarf.

Specs wearer

Refers to a Pokémon set holding the item Choice Specs.

Cleric

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to restore the HP and/or cure the status ailments of its allies, through the use of status moves like Wish and Aromatherapy.

Counter

Refers to a Pokémon set that has an advantage over another Pokémon set to the point where it can take a turn to switch in and subsequently foil it.

DDer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Dragon Dance.

Decoy

Refers to a Pokémon that is knocked out as part of the course of action chosen by its Trainer in the given battle situation.

Dual screener

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Light Screen and Reflect.

Endureversal

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Endure and Reversal or Flail. May be assisted through the use of a Focus Sash, Salac Berry, or Liechi Berry. It is amply featued in the games. There are many similar strategies, including F.E.A.R.

F.E.A.R.

Main article: Appendix:F.E.A.R.

Refers to a Pokémon set with a comparatively low HP stat, holding a Focus Sash, with the move Endeavor and a damage-dealing move with increased priority. Some variations use the Ability Sturdy instead of Focus Sash.

Glass cannon

Refers to a Pokémon set with comparatively high Attack and/or Special Attack that, due to its combination of HP and Defense/Special Defense, takes a comparatively high percentage of damage from damage-dealing moves.

Hazer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Haze.

Lead

Refers to a Pokémon set that is sent out first, or one of the Pokémon sets that is commonly sent out first.

Paraflincher

Refers to a Pokémon set that is capable of inducing paralysis and causing flinching.

Pseudo-passer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to aid its allies directly through the use of status moves with beneficial effects (such as Wish or Reflect), but without using Baton Pass.

RestoChesto

Refers to the move Rest and the held item Chesto Berry being present in a Pokémon set. It is amply featured in the games.

Sashed

Refers to the held item Focus Sash being present in a Pokémon set.

Shuffler

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail.

Phazer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to eliminate an opponent's Pokémon's positive stat changes and/or other beneficial effects without using Haze. One approach is to force the opponent's Pokémon to be sent back, by using Roar, Whirlwind, Circle Throw, or Dragon Tail. Another approach is to pressure the opponent to call back their Pokémon, by using status moves with disadvantageous effects that can be removed through switching (such as Leech Seed, Perish Song, or Yawn).

Status shuffler

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to inflict status ailments on multiple opposing Pokémon, and cause multiple switches from the opponent in order to achieve this end.

Spinner

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Rapid Spin.

Spiker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Spikes.

Staller

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to force a standstill in order to enjoy its advantages, which may include recurring effect damage to opposing Pokémon (such as from certain status ailments or weather conditions). This may be achieved through the use of moves/held items/Abilities that restore HP and/or moves like Protect, usually combined with stats and type(s) that minimize the percentage of damage taken from damage-dealing moves. It is amply featured in the games.

RestTalker

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Rest and Sleep Talk. It is amply featured in the games. Also referred to as a "Sleep Talker" or a "STalker".

Revenge killer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon without preparation by timing the free switch-in that is granted when an ally is knocked out. Is typically tailored torwards getting to move first, by including one or more damage-dealing moves with increased priority and/or a comparatively high Speed stat (achieved with or without the held item Choice Scarf). This aspect of Pokémon battling is highlighted in the games in the form of the move Retaliate.

Seeder

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the move Leech Seed. A "Subseeder" refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Leech Seed.

Spinblocker

Refers to a Ghost-type Pokémon that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from successfully using Rapid Spin.

Sponge

See wall.

Subpasser

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to create a substitute by using Substitute and pass it on to an ally by using Baton Pass.

Subpuncher

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Substitute and Focus Punch. It is amply featured in the games.

Sunnybeamer

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to use SolarBeam under intense sunlight.

Sweeper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to knock out opposing Pokémon in succession, usually through the assistance of positive stat changes. Commonly branched into the categories physical sweeper, special sweeper, and mixed sweeper, depending on its stats and damage-dealing moves.

Tank

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both, while at the same time posing a threat in the form of damage-dealing moves backed by a comparatively high Attack or Special Attack stat.

Thunderdancer

Refers to a Pokémon set that includes the moves Thunder and Rain Dance.

Trapper

Refers to a Pokémon set that is intended to prevent opposing Pokémon from switching out, through the effects of various status moves, damage-dealing moves, or Abilities, and take advantage of the situation.

Wall

Refers to a Pokémon set that, due to its combination of HP and Defense and/or Special Defense, takes a comparatively low percentage of damage from physical moves or special moves or both. Commonly branched into the categories physical wall, special wall, and mixed wall, depending on its stats.

Specific sets

Sets that are only seen on one to several Pokémon or are best known on a single Pokémon.

Atmacune

A Suicune moveset from Generation II, which has Curse, Rest, Return and Roar. Not usable in Generation III or IV because Curse is no longer available in Suicune's movelist due to losing TM status.

Bellyzard

A moveset created specifically for the Charizard evolution family. The moveset contains Belly Drum, Substitute, Fire Punch or Flare Blitz and any other move. The held item is usually a Salac Berry. Belly Drum followed by Substitute maximizes the Attack stat and lowers HP enough to activate Blaze and the Salac Berry as long as Charizard's HP is divisible by 4. The power of Charizard's Fire-type moves is increased, Attack is maximized and Speed is raised enough to possibly attack first. This results in an incredibly powerful physical Fire-type attack. Stealth Rock is a reliable way to counter this strategy.

Breloomurder

Works with a Breloom that has Spore, Focus Punch, Substitute, and Facade, the Poison Heal Ability, while holding a Toxic Orb. After using Spore, Breloom is free to repeatedly charge and use a STAB Focus Punch on the sleeping foe. Furthermore, due to the poison induced by the held Toxic Orb, Facade's power is drastically increased, and Breloom's Ability heals it every turn. Seed Bomb is sometimes used instead of Substitute to allow the user to hit Ghost-type Pokémon.

CalmCune

A Suicune with Calm Mind. Rest is often also used. A very powerful and over-used Pokémon due to Suicune's two weaknesses being special types prior to the physical/special split, and as a result its effectiveness has been reduced with Generation IV's Attack/Special split. Some counters include a hazer or phazer, a strong physical Electric- or Grass-type attack and the move Encore.

Celetran

A combination of Celebi and Heatran used in the same team, this works because Celebi covers all of Heatran's weaknesses and Heatran covers all of Celebi's weaknesses. Both of these Pokémon have mixed wall stats, they can take on both physical and special hits.

There are other combinations like this, such as Latias or Latios and a Steel-type (a combination that resists every type in the game) though these combinations are not as well known.

ChainChomp

Garchomp that is designed as a mixed sweeper with the moves Draco Meteor and Fire Blast. The intention of this Pokémon is catching the opponent off guard as they send in a standard Physical wall by taking advantage of most physical walls lacking a good Special Defense stat. A variation of this set can also be used with Salamence.

Crocune

A Suicune with the moves Rest, Sleep Talk, Calm Mind and Surf. The Cro- prefix is also used for other Pokémon that work in a similar way, like Crophy and Crotomb.

Curselax

A moveset that uses Curse and Rest on an already slow Pokémon to ignore the Speed drop. Although Snorlax is the most common user (hence the name), it can also appear on other Pokémon (provided they aren't of the Ghost-type). Especially useful in a team using Trick Room as the Speed drops become Speed boosts instead.

DrizzleToed and DroughtTales

A Politoed or Ninetales with their Hidden Ability, Drizzle and Drought, respectively. Used to make permanent weather to help boost Politoed's/Ninetales's teammates and themselves. Tyranitar, Abomasnow, and Hippowdon are also used to set up permanent weather.

LeadApe

An Infernape used as a lead. Commonly knowing the moves Fake Out, Stealth Rock, Fire Blast, and Close Combat and holding a Focus Sash. Infernape is a popular lead for its ability to set up an entry hazard while generally knocking out the opponent's lead and preventing them from setting up Stealth Rock or Spikes. This Infernape set is used with a Naive or Hasty nature to boost Speed while allowing Fire Blast, a special move, and Close Combat, a physical move, to do maximum damage. Generally, all Infernape's effort values for this set are invested into Attack, Special Attack, and Speed.

McIceGar

A moveset for Gengar with many variations. Usually used to describe the Subpunching Gengar with Thunderbolt and Ice Punch, but moves such as Psychic, Shadow Ball and Sludge Bomb are sometimes included. As of Generation IV, Ice Punch is no longer a reliable option for McIceGar since it has become physical, and so it must use Hidden Power instead.

MixApe

A commonly used mixed sweeper moveset for Infernape that is extremely useful for wall-breaking, especially Skarmbliss. The set consists of a combination of the moves Flamethrower/Fire Blast, Close Combat, Grass Knot, ThunderPunch, Hidden Power Ice and Nasty Plot. It usually holds the item Life Orb. Generally used with a Naive or Hasty nature, and all effort values are invested into Attack, Special Attack, and Speed.

MixMence

A commonly used variant of Salamence. It is a Sweeper that runs one of two movesets that utilize a mixture of strong physical and special attacks.

Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Main article: Pseudo-legendary Pokémon

Any of the following Pokémon: Dragonite, Tyranitar, Salamence, Metagross, Garchomp, and Hydreigon. These Pokémon have base stat totals of 600 and diverse movepools, but are not legendary Pokémon.

PowerKing

A risky but extremely powerful double-battle strategy requiring three Pokémon and several steps. On the first turn a Medicham with Pure Power and low defenses is sent out with a fast and moderately defensive Pokémon with Skill Swap. The Medicham will be knocked out, but not before Skill Swap is used on it. An Adamant Slaking with the moves Endure, Reversal, Flail, Shadow Claw and the item Salac Berry is sent out in replacement of the Medicham. The second turn is the riskiest turn, as the opponent must attack the Slaking. The Pokémon with Skill Swap must use it on the Slaking and the Slaking must use Endure. At this point, Flail will have a power of 200 with STAB, Reversal can be used against Steel- and Rock-type Pokémon, and Shadow Claw can be used to hit Ghost-type Pokémon. A less powerful but less risky version can be done with a Regigigas.

ScarfChomp

A Garchomp holding the item Choice Scarf, whose Speed is multiplied by 1.5.

Giovanni has a Garchomp with a Choice Scarf in his Pokémon World Tournament Type Expert Tournament and World Leaders Tournament team.

Skarmbliss

A combination of Skarmory and Blissey used in the same team, which is designed to make use of Skarmory's high Defense stat and numerous resistances, as well as Blissey's high Special Defense stat and extraordinary HP stat. It is very difficult to beat if one is not prepared, so most teams carry a Skarmbliss counter. This combination does not work as well in Generation IV because of the physical/special split. In Generation III, Skarmory's weaknesses were special, so Blissey could cover those weaknesses well, and Blissey's weakness was physical so Skarmory took that well. Due to the physical/special split, it isn't as reliable.

SpecsMence

A Salamence holding Choice Specs (or Wise Glasses in some cases), with the moves Draco Meteor, Fire Blast or Flamethrower, Hydro Pump, and Dragon Pulse.

Suicide Spiker/Rocker

A Forretress with the moveset consisting of Stealth Rock, Spikes, Toxic Spikes and Explosion. Set up all the traps then use Explosion so the next Pokémon has to deal with the brunt of the attacks of the spikes taking up to 50% of their HP and being badly poisoned. Works well with a Shuffler to make all of the opponent's Pokémon suffer.

Suicide Lead

A moveset in which the user is equipped with a Focus Sash. The purpose of this moveset is to set up Stealth Rock, while anticipating an attack that could OHKO the user, but survives with the Focus Sash. This is a very common moveset for leading Azelf and Aerodactyl.

TechniLoom

Breloom with its Hidden Ability, Technician, that knows Mach Punch and Bullet Seed.

TyraniBoah

A moveset specifically for Tyranitar (but also viable on others) with the Subpuncher combo and the BoltBeam (or in Tyranitar's case, BoltCrunch) combo. It is also an example of very advanced battling techniques on both sides, as it requires the player to predict that the opponent will predict the next attack and switch to something resistant to it. An example of this would be if the opponent has a Salamence in play and expects the player to use Ice Beam and thus switches to a Starmie. Predicting the switch, the player actually select Thunderbolt or Crunch and knocks out the Starmie on the switch-in.

Wondertomb/Wondereye

A hacked Spiritomb or Sableye with the Ability Wonder Guard. Since Spiritomb and Sableye have no weaknesses, they cannot be damaged by normal attacks. However, they can be damaged by status ailments, weather conditions, entry hazards, Fire Fang*, Future Sight*, Doom Desire*, Beat Up*, Struggle, recoil, Life Orb, Sticky Barb, Black Sludge, Rough Skin, Iron Barbs, Rocky Helmet, fixed-damage attacks, after the use of Gastro Acid, Entrainment*, Worry Seed, Simple Beam, Foresight, Odor Sleuth or Soak, and by Pokémon with Mold Breaker, Turboblaze, Teravolt, or Scrappy.

In the fourth Pokéstar Studios movie in the Ghost Eraser Series Majin is a dual-type Dark/Ghost opponent which has the Ability Wonder Guard.

Tier

Main article: Tier

A tier is a list of Pokémon in the metagame selected based on numerous traits, such as how the Pokémon's stats are distributed, its type and moves, and overall usefulness in battle.

Uber

A tier of the metagame, currently the highest there is. It is specifically constructed as a banlist for the Overused metagame. The tier mostly consists of legendary Pokémon, although not all of them are in the Uber tier. Abilities can also be Uber.

OU

Over-Used. A tier of the metagame. It is the second highest tier, only surpassed by Uber.

BL

Borderline. A tier of the metagame. It is the third highest tier, in between OU and UU.

UU

Under-Used. A tier of the metagame that is the third lowest, not counting NFE.

RU

Rarely-Used. A tier in the metagame that is the second lowest, not counting NFE. This tier first appeared in Generation V.

NU

Never-Used. A tier of the metagame. It is currently the lowest tier to date, not counting NFE. This tier first appeared in Generation III.

NFE

Not an actual tier, but a term used to describe Pokémon that are not fully evolved, and thus should not be used competitively until they evolve. There are some NFEs that can viably be used competitively, namely:

Some NFEs do exactly the same as their evolution. These may also be used competitively, but only in lower tiers than their evolution. An example of this is Munchlax in NU. There are some Pokémon that work in OU that are NFEs, such as Porygon2, because it fits in differently from its evolution, Porygon-Z. Several other NFE Pokémon became viable, even in OU, with the Eviolite, with the most notable being Chansey.

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